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General

This Be The Verse

Posted  December 19, 2019  by  Anonymous

I find myself reading a number of the advice columnists these days. And as I read about all the problems people have with their families, I often think of this great poem:

This Be The Verseby Philip Larkin

They fuck you up, your mum and dad.
They may not mean to, but they do.
They fill you with the faults they had
And add some extra, just for you.

But they were fucked up in their turn
By fools in old-style hats and coats,
Who half the time were soppy-stern
And half at one another’s throats.

Man hands on misery to man.
It deepens like a coastal shelf.
Get out as early as you can,
And don’t have any kids yourself.

Someday I will share this with my own adult children, if I ever have the courage.

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Children

Canadian Donut Chain Launches Donut Flavoured Cereal And People Are Angry. Why I Think There Are Better Things (And Worse Cereals) To Be Angry About.

Posted  January 9, 2020  by  Yoni Freedhoff

So last week saw the Canadian launch of timbits cereal and as evidenced by the number of people have sent press releases about it to me, not everyone is pleased.

Timbits, for readers who don’t know, are donut holes from Canadian donut chain giant Tim Hortons.

People are upset because apparently this sugary cereal is over the top and somehow extra wrong or extra awful.

But why?

Tim Horton’s certainly isn’t in the business of protecting or promoting public health. Nor is Post Foods. Nor should anyone expect either to be.

Presumably the sugar is a concern for people, and at 17g per cup (4.25 teaspoons), it’s definitely not an insignificant amount, but it’s not more than many other sugary cereals, and is in fact less than Post Raisin Bran which packs 24% more sugar at 21g (5.25 teaspoons) per cup.

All this to say, it’s difficult to get angry with Tim Horton’s or Post Foods for trying to sell food as selling food is literally their only job, and frankly this food isn’t any worse than comparable foods they’re already selling.

So what should the cereal aisle make people angry about?

How about laxity in advertising laws that allows for cartoon characters to be festooned on boxes of sugary cereals and prey on children? Or laxity in front-of-packaging laws that allow Froot Loops boxes to brag about their whole grain or vitamin D content? Or the failure of our government to create a front-of-package warning system like the one that was enacted in Chile.

What would life in Canadian cereal aisles look like if we followed Chile’s lead?

Here’s Frosted Flakes before and after Chile’s laws came into effect

Sure looks great to me.

(And for the grammar police, ‘donut’ is how Tim Horton’s spells doughnut)

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General

Featured Teacher: Michelle Parrish

Posted  April 1, 2020  by  Anonymous

Northern Ontario teacher Michelle Parrish

Michelle Parrish, whose background is teaching middle school, has switched her focus to support other teachers across her board by providing resources and guidance to bring Indigenous history and knowledge into the classroom. (Photo: Michelle Parrish)

Michelle Parrish spent a good portion of this past winter travelling around northern Ontario with Can Geo Education’s Indigenous Peoples Atlas of Canada Giant Floor Map, going from school to school in her district to help teachers bring Indigenous history and knowledge into their classrooms.

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Children

Australian Food Industry Launches World’s Least Aggressive New Voluntary Self-Regulatory Effort

Posted  March 2, 2020  by  Yoni Freedhoff

Waiting for any industry to self-regulate itself is just plain dumb. Honestly, industry’s job is to protect and promote sales, and that’s of course true for the food industry as well.

Self-regulation tends to crop up not out of altruism or doing the right thing, but rather as a means to forestall legislative regulatory efforts which in turn would prove to be more damaging to sales.

Take this recent initiative out of Australia which will see the food industry not advertising their junk to kids within 150m (500ft) of schools. 150 whole metres! While certainly not likely to do anything at all, it’ll be especially useless perhaps in that the school buses themselves will be exempt, as of course will be the bus stops’ shelters.

Oh, and as toothless as it is, it’s also voluntary.

Really the only thing this initiative will do is provide the food industry with ammunition if and when facing calls for legislated regulation (something we’re hearing more and more calls for) and to pretend that they care about anything other than profits.

It’s always best to remember, as I’ve written before, the food industry is neither friend, nor foe, nor partner.

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General

What are maps really saying about COVID-19 in Canada?

Posted  April 1, 2020  by  Anonymous

number of reported Canadian cases of COVID-19 by regional health authority

The number of reported Canadian cases of COVID-19 by regional health authority focusing on the parts of each authority where people actually live. (Map: Chris Brackley/Can Geo)

If there’s one thing that’s true about COVID-19, it’s that the scale of direct transmission is local. Which is to say that to acquire the virus you must come in personal contact with it. The safe zone, we are told, is two metres. If you are more than two metres from the virus, you are almost assured not to get it.

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General

Exxon May Crush Bailout Hopes for Suffering Fracking Companies

Posted  March 27, 2020  by  Anonymous
Antique truck rusting in the oil fields of Reeves County, Texas, in the Permian Basin.

Read time: 10 mins

The Washington Post reported March 10 that the Trump administration was considering some type of financial help for the failing U.S. shale oil and gas industry, “as industry officials close to the administration clamor for help.” Those officials — billionaire shale CEO Harold Hamm was likely among them — seemed desperate for government assistance because, as DeSmog has documented, their deeply indebted businesses have lost billions of dollars during the fracking boom. Even before the recent oil price war and COVID-19 pandemic, these companies could hardly stay afloat, making cries for some type of corporate welfare likely unavoidable. 

But that’s not the same message across the entire oil and gas industry.

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Children

TikTok Is All About Fat Shaming These Days

Posted  March 9, 2020  by  Yoni Freedhoff

I was driving with my 13 year old daughter on Saturday and we were just chatting. I asked her what was trending these days on her TikTok stream (in the past she’d been served up antisemitism)? Apparently it’s fat shaming Lizzo.

I asked her to share some videos with me.

She sent over 10 in less than a minute.

Some representative examples to follow, but all this to say, TikTok, while hugely entertaining, is a cesspool of hate and bullying, and if your children use it, probably worth asking them every once in a while what’s trending on their streams so that you can take the time at least to talk about it.

@noahswitzer98

Everyone please ##stop making ##lizzo memes ##fyp

♬ original sound – noahswitzer98

@nickring4

When you lose Lizzo while your whale watching 😂 ##greenscreen ##lizzo ##meme ##xyzbca ##xyzcba ##joke ##fyp ##memes ##tiktokmemes ##comedy ##comedicgenius

♬ ITs ANIT new girlfriend of your ex – its_anit

@yaboyg35

##greenscreenvideo ##lizzo ##meme ##tacticalnuke ##mw2

♬ original sound – yaboyg35

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General

Oil Refineries Face Shutdowns as Demand Collapses

Posted  March 30, 2020  by  Anonymous
ExxonMobil's Baytown refinery in Texas

Read time: 6 mins

A growing number of refineries around the world are either curtailing operations or shutting down entirely as the oil market collapses. 

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General

Christmas

Posted  December 24, 2019  by  Anonymous

My favorite passages from A Christmas Carol are the descriptions of Christmas in Victorian London:Meanwhile the fog and darkness thickened so, that people ran about with flaring links, proffering their services to go before horses in carriages, and con…

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General

Saturday Stories: #COVID19 #FlattenTheCurve #CancelEverything Edition

Posted  March 14, 2020  by  Yoni Freedhoff

7 views on why social distancing is so important right now and why we have to “cancel everything“. If you think that #COVID19 isn’t a big deal, do take the time to read these pieces to learn why you’re wrong (ordered solely by way of the order I happened to read them in).

Eliza Barclay and Dylan Scott, in Vox.

Tomas Pueyo in Medium

Yascha Monk, in The Atlantic

Helen Branswell, in STAT

André Picard, in The Globe and Mail

Sharon Kirkey in The National Post

Kaitlyn Tiffany in The Atlantic

Also, here’s Wency Leung, in The Globe and Mail, on what you should do if you think you have COVID19, and here is the Toronto Star’s infographic on what self-isolation should look like if it’s determined that you’ve contracted the virus.

Siouxsie Wiles and Toby Morris / CC BY-SA

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General

Saturday Stories: Coronavirus Edition

Posted  February 29, 2020  by  Yoni Freedhoff

James Hamblin, in The Atlantic, on how yes, you’re probably going to get the coronavirus.

Peter Daszak, in The New York Times, welcomes you to the age of pandemics.

Vivian Wang, in The New York Times, with the bad good news that most coronavirus cases are likely to be mild.

Zeynep Tufekci, in Scientific American, on what you can do to prepare for when the coronavirus spreads to your country.

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General

10 Million Americans Lost Their Jobs In Two Weeks Because of Coronavirus

Posted  April 2, 2020  by  Anonymous

Economists who study unemployment expected the new figures to be a bloodbath — but they didn’t think they would be this bad.

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General

TPL heebie-jeebies and the Fa’a Samoa

Posted  October 30, 2019  by  Anonymous

Let me be clear: when it comes to Meghan Murphy and her followers at the Toronto Public Library versus the protesters outside, I stand with the protesters. Now, let me be less clear. At this point, I’m beginning to…

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General

Great tweets of the day, animal edition

Posted  January 22, 2020  by  Anonymous

Here’s some tweets that I have been enjoying today:

An incorrectly assembled whippet. pic.twitter.com/CVAAOL3efV

— Jonathan Best (@jonnnybest) January 18, 2020

No matter the size, cats will be cats😂 pic.twitter.com/EXaVWGNGaa

— Akki (@akkitwts) January 16, 2020

— 41 Strange (@41Strange) January 17, 2020

There are 2 types of dogs… pic.twitter.com/mFIQE91JCu

— viralvideos (@BestVideosviral) January 22, 2020


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General

Oil Industry Front Group Launches Latest Attack on Electric Vehicle Tax Credit in Senate Energy Bill

Posted  March 13, 2020  by  Anonymous
electric car and tax credit form

Read time: 4 mins

As this week the U.S. Senate tries to advance stalled bipartisan energy legislation, the American Energy Alliance (AEA) last week announced its latest initiative opposing any tax credit extension for electric vehicles (EV) in that bill.

Through a series of digital ads, the group, which receives a substantial share of its donations from an oil refinery trade group, is calling on Senate Republicans to squash a proposed amendment expanding the number of vehicles eligible for the credit.

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General

Coal Industry Group Asks Federal Lawmakers to Cut Funding for Black Lung Program, Citing COVID-19

Posted  March 20, 2020  by  Sharon Kelly

Read time: 5 mins

The National Mining Association (NMA) on Wednesday called on President Donald Trump and federal lawmakers to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic by cutting a tax used to support coal miners affected by black lung disease, to cut funding to clean up high-priority abandoned coal mine sites, and taking other steps that would financially benefit the coal mining industry.

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General

Stock Market Turmoil Undermines Claimed Energy Dominance Benefits of US Shale Drilling

Posted  March 9, 2020  by  Sharon Kelly
Donald Trump

Read time: 9 mins

Oil prices collapsed today amid falling energy demand and the global response to the novel coronavirus outbreak, as the number of confirmed COVID-19 cases worldwide reached over 113,000. On Friday, talks disintegrated inside the so-called OPEC+ alliance, which includes Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) as well as non-OPEC members like Russia.

This breakdown kicked off a global oil price war that left Wall Street reeling on Monday, threatening the already troubled U.S. shale oil and gas industry and challenging the resilience of the Trump administration’s “energy dominance” theory that argues domestic shale oil production benefits national security and insulates the U.S. against the actions of other countries. Instead, relying on a shaky shale industry may have left the U.S. economy more vulnerable during times of crisis.

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General

Chamber of Commerce’s Energy Members Silent After Group Opposed Using Wartime Law to Produce Medical Supplies

Posted  March 30, 2020  by  guest
US Chamber of Commerce building

Read time: 6 mins

By Dave Anderson, Energy and Policy Institute. Originally posted on Energy and Policy Institute.

Major electric utilities and fossil fuel producers that are members of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce remained silent when asked whether they supported the lobbying group’s controversial opposition to using the Defense Production Act to address a shortage of medical supplies and equipment crucial to fighting the coronavirus. 

Some of those same energy companies, and their trade associations, have for years lobbied for the use of the Defense Production Act to bail out struggling coal plants.

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General

Exxon Now Wants to Write the Rules for Regulating Methane Emissions

Posted  March 16, 2020  by  Anonymous
A compressor station along newly constructed pipeline in Loving County, Texas.

Read time: 10 mins

ExxonMobil is a company capable of contradictions. It has been lobbying against government efforts to address climate change while running ads touting its own efforts to do so.

And while the oil giant has been responsible for massive methane releases, Exxon has now proposed a new regulatory framework for cutting emissions of this powerful greenhouse gas that it hopes regulators and industry will adopt. As Exxon put it, the goal is to achieve “cost-effective and reasonable methane-emission regulations.”

So, why is Exxon asking to be regulated?

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General

Saturday Stories: Some Of This Week’s Most Important #COVID19 Reads

Posted  March 28, 2020  by  Yoni Freedhoff

Jennifer Yang, in The Toronto Star, speaks with 3 of Toronto’s health care heroes.

Adam Rogers, in Wired, explains what convalescent plasma is and how it might help treat COVID19.

Ed Yong, in The Atlantic, being Ed Yong and writing an incredible piece on how this pandemic might end.

David Enrich, Rachel Abrams and Steven Kurutz, in The New York Time, on the sewing army rising up to help.

Helen Branswell, in STAT, summarizing all the we’ve learned to date about the SARS-CoV2 virus.

Daniela J. Lamas, in The New York Times, writing as a critical care physician in Boston on the unfathomable reality she’s facing there.

Siddhartha Mukherjee, in The New Yorker, on how the coronavirus behaves inside of our bodies.

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General

Saturday Stories: CRISPR Ethics, Auschwitz’ Survivors’ Warnings, And Illegal Abortion

Posted  February 22, 2020  by  Yoni Freedhoff

Ethan Weiss, in STAT, with a personal essay about his daughter, albinism, CRISPR and ethics.

Jonathan Freedland, in The Guardian, with the last desperate warnings of Auschwitz’ few remaining survivors.

Olga Khazan, in The Atlantic, on what abortion will look like if it once again becomes illegal.

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General

“Send us your money and everything will be just fine”

Posted  December 4, 2019  by  Anonymous

I’m very glad to see that Canadian authorities are taking these scams seriously: A Burnaby, B.C., man has been identified as a suspect in an RCMP investigation into organized crime groups;accused of scamming Canadians by posing as Canada Revenue Agency…

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General

Saturday Stories: Stretching, Microbiomes, And Supplements

Posted  February 1, 2020  by  Yoni Freedhoff

Alex Hutchinson, in Outside, on why you probably don’t need to stretch.

Peter J. Turnbaugh, in Nature, on diets and microbiomes.

Tamar Haspel, in The Washington Post, asks why people are spending $35 billion on supplements if they don’t do anything?

[And if you don’t follow me on Twitter or Facebook, here’s a piece I wrote for Elemental on how when it comes to the Biggest Loser, there are no winners]

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General

Why Public Health Experts Support These Youth Suing the US Government Over Climate Change

Posted  March 25, 2020  by  Anonymous
protesters at a "die-in" at COP25

Read time: 5 mins

Leading experts in the medical community, including two former U.S. Surgeons General, recently filed supporting briefs backing a youth climate lawsuit against the federal government because, like the current coronavirus pandemic, the climate crisis poses “unprecedented threats to public health and safety.”

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General

Thousands of People Are Building a 1:1 Recreation of Earth in ‘Minecraft’

Posted  April 2, 2020  by  Anonymous

The Earth in Minecraft is one of the most ambitious projects ever undertaken in the game.

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Football

Does Tom Brady Think COVID-19 Was Sent to Make Us All ‘Chill Out’?

Posted  April 2, 2020  by  Anonymous

“Maybe the world is telling us to slow down a little bit, you know?” he said.

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General

Best moment at #SOTU

Posted  February 4, 2020  by  Anonymous
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General

‘Yoga With Adriene’ On Her Rising Popularity During the Coronavirus Pandemic

Posted  April 2, 2020  by  Anonymous

As more people are trying to stay healthy while not being able to leave their homes, YouTube’s yoga star becomes more popular than ever.

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General

Why Games Have Always Obsessed Over Pandemic Authoritarianism

Posted  April 2, 2020  by  Anonymous

Plagues and the politics of endless crisis.

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Children

Study Published Stating The Daily Mile Doesn’t Improve Childhood Obesity Speaks To Risks Of Tying Weight To Exercise

Posted  January 29, 2020  by  Yoni Freedhoff

Published this week in the International Journal of Obesity is Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of The Daily Mile on childhood weight outcomes and wellbeing: a cluster randomised controlled trial whereby researchers reported on the impact a school year worth of 15 minutes of daily running had on children’s BMIs.

It’s an odd study in that we’re talking about 15 minutes of running per day which literally no one should expect to have a marked effect on childhood obesity given both math (15 mins of children running, jogging, or walking a mile probably doesn’t even burn the calories of a single Oreo) and the fact that multiple meta-analyses have shown that even far more involved school based PE initiatives don’t have an impact on childhood obesity.

It’s also odd because The Daily Mile itself doesn’t tie itself to weight,

The aim of The Daily Mile is to improve the physical, social, emotional and mental health and wellbeing of our children – regardless of age, ability or personal circumstances

And it’s a problematic study in that consequent to the wholly predictable non-exciting outcome, it’s the sort of study that might be used as a means to discourage the program’s continuation.

What might have been studied instead? How about the impact of the Daily Mile on marks, concentration, endurance, or physical literacy (note, they attempted to do some of this, but data collection was too poor for them to make many conclusions), or if there was a strong desire to tie it to something medical, how about blood pressure, heart rate recovery, mood, sleep, or lipid levels?

As I’ve said many times, dumbing down exercise to weight management shortchanges both the benefits of exercise and the realities of weight management, and frankly doing that in the name of a program that sees kids running an extra 15 minutes a day, and then seeing that published in a credible journal, speaks to just how pervasive and dangerous that practice is.

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General

Court Rules EPA Can’t Keep Secret Key Model Used in Clean Car Rule Rollback

Posted  April 1, 2020  by  Anonymous
Andrew Wheeler

Read time: 3 mins

A federal appeals court ruled April 1 that the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) had no basis to withhold one key part of a computer model used by the agency to develop its less stringent greenhouse gas emission standards for new vehicles. The ruling came just one day after EPA and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) released a final rule rolling back clean car standards set under the Obama administration.

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General

Wetsuweten protests- we don’t get to choose the battle; we can only choose our side

Posted  February 16, 2020  by  Anonymous
Once again, I think we have reached the point in Canada where we don’t get to choose the battle. We can only choose our side.
I can’t say I understand the #Wetsuweten protests, but I am coming to realize that if Canada’s usual suspects are against them, then the side I must choose is to support them.
I cannot yet see what the resolution will be acceptable to this impasse — no pipeline at all? a pipeline in a different place? some kind of a joint economic development consortium between Wetsuweten and the government and the gas companies? I just don’t know.
But I do know that I simply cannot support this kind of attitude:

Conservative Leader Andrew Scheers says the “protesters” need to check their “privilege” and let the rail system open again. #Wet‘suwet’en. pic.twitter.com/dQKZ6IKouU

— APTN National News (@APTNNews) February 14, 2020

This is civil war.

Military action is a must.

Retain / constrain as needed. https://t.co/aOlxSx5R3Y

— * W. Brett Wilson * (@WBrettWilson) February 14, 2020

Or this kind of frightening, provocative and unacceptable behaviour:

Wet’suwe’ten protester in RCMP gunsight pleads in video for police to put down their arms | CBC News https://t.co/6jtXi7vHzj

— Tantoo Cardinal (@tantooC) February 14, 2020

At least there is still a little humour to be found, too:

Oh well, just boil it, you’ll be fine 🤷🏻‍♀️#Ironic https://t.co/hSVXcjGoaT

— Janine Manning (@NewStarWoman) February 14, 2020

Montreal Simon is concerned that the blockade protests risk annoying and inconveniencing so many people in Eastern Canada who have no voice or choice in the matter, that support for reconciliation will be threatened — and this is not an unlikely concern. Susan Delacourt also writes about how complicated the reconciliation issues have now become:

This is where Trudeau’s “most important relationship” gets complicated, maybe hopelessly so. It is not just about historic reconciliation. It’s also about economic circumstances, resource development versus the environment, and the populism arising from economic inequality — some of the most vexing, conflict-laden issues facing the federal government. Throw in contempt for the law and it’s easy to see why what looked important in 2015 can look impossible in 2020.

Here are some good tweet threads with more info:

OK, thread: For the last few days I’ve tried to learn what I can about an alternate route for the Coastal GasLink pipeline that was apparently proposed by #Wetsuweten hereditary chiefs and brought into the discussion by a Green Party MP. Here’s what I’ve learned pic.twitter.com/hm4gAVCfyc

— Andrew Kurjata 📻 (@akurjata) February 16, 2020

Some thoughts on the “rule of law” that so many Canadians wish would end today’s uncomfortable and inconvenient protests over a fossil gas (ie natural gas) pipeline crossing unceded Wet’suwet’en territory and RCMP action to drive it through. #Wetsuweten #CoastalGasLink

THREAD…

— Peter Fairley (@pfairley) February 14, 2020


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General

It’s Twelfth Night!

Posted  January 6, 2020  by  Anonymous

Today is Twelfth Night AKA Epiphany Eve.Here is one classic version:   And another much earlier classic too: The director, Wendy Toye, was one of the few female film directors in the 1950s (or in any decade, for that matter).

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General

Life In Scarborough: The Plague Journal, Day II

Posted  March 13, 2020  by  bigcitylib

Visited The Elsy (LCBO) today.  I notice that while they’re knifing each other over toilet paper at the Walmart across the parking lot, here everything is calm.  People believe that Water and wipes are essential, booze some kind of peripheral…

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General

Back Home Again

Posted  February 5, 2020  by  Polar Bear

I have been away from the blogger writing for quite a time. I have been busy working to get well and after two years without being able to walk I am finally making progress. I was encouraged during the past couple of years to receive many contacts from…

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General

Canadian scene

Posted  December 31, 2019  by  Anonymous
A few Canadian tweets to finish out the year:

Only in Canada eh https://t.co/AQwmru6GOs

— Raging🇨🇦Granny/ Resistor & Team Trudeau (@RagingLibNana) December 30, 2019

Exactly five years ago today, I moved from Nigeria to Canada and my life changed forever. That’s it. That’s the tweet.

— ufuoma (@theufuoma) December 31, 2019

Happy Birthday to The Guess Who singer songwriter, keyboardist and guitarist Burton Cummings, born on this day in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada in 1947. 🎉🎂🎶🇨🇦 pic.twitter.com/neqOAs6nWf

— Purple Beacon (@BeaconPurple) December 31, 2019

Crime is getting out of hand! https://t.co/Po7f2QjNYU

— Meanwhile in Canada (@MeanwhileinCana) December 31, 2019



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General

Happy Festivus!

Posted  December 23, 2019  by  Anonymous
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General

Wet’suwet’en update

Posted  February 22, 2020  by  Anonymous
He waited as long as he could, too long in the opinion of many.
He was obviously hoping that peaceful negotiation could bring down the rail barricades, in the best Canadian tradition.
But at last Justin Trudeau’s patience was exhausted.The negotiations were going nowhere, because there were none.
“We can’t have dialogue when only one party is coming to the table. For this reason, we have no choice but to stop making the same overtures.”
And for that the blame must go to these old men, the Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs.

Like Montreal Simon, I could not believe how lackadaisical and disrespectful the hereditary chiefs were being in refusing to respond to Trudeau’s obvious respect.
They didn’t seem to realize that the time to make progress was NOW, this week, when they had Canada’s attention and a great deal of support across the country. 
What they cannot do is keep raising the ante.
While the story earlier this week was that the Wet’suwet’en had worked out a deal for RCMP to move back to Houston BC, the story today was that they wanted both the RCMP AND the pipeline company to leave, and then “nation-to-nation discussions with Canada and BC” should start.
And the tactic of leisurely visiting Mohawk reserves in Eastern Canada and holding news conferences instead of talking to the prime minister doesn’t make any sense.

“We are waiting for Indigenous leadership to show that it understands,” [Trudeau] said in a news conference. “The onus is on them.”
Injunctions to clear tracks must be obeyed and the law must be upheld, he said, adding that it is pointless to continue making overtures to Indigenous leaders if they aren’t accepted.
“Let us be clear: all Canadians are paying the price. Some people can’t get to work, others have lost their jobs,” Trudeau said. “Essential goods … cannot get where they need to go.”
The situation “is unacceptable and untenable,” he said.

Canadian support has started to evaporate when the chiefs could not seem to articulate what they wanted to achieve – no pipeline at all? a pipeline but on a different route? more negotiations for the existing route?  — and when thousands of Canadians were being increasingly affected, losing jobs and fearing for their heating oil supplies. 

Also as predicted earlier this week, Canadian support for Trudeau’s whole reconciliation agenda was disintegrating as the railway disruptions continued with no end in sight.
Trudeau appeared to realize this too, after talking to the Premiers on Thursday and to Cabinet today.

On Twitter, the usual suspects were berating Trudeau for not acting first and thinking later. But Trudeau tried to resolve the blockades with dialogue instead of immediately turning the dispute into a dick-measuring contest like Scheer and McKay wanted.
At least the Mohawks are clear about what they want — the Mohawks have an agreement with Indigenous Services minister Marc Miller that the Ontario trains will run as soon as RCMP have withdrawn to Houston from Wet’suwet’en territory. 
As Manitoba Premier Palliser said today, no individual or group has an absolute veto on natural resource projects.

“Public opinion matters on these things,” he said. “This federal Liberal government has said that reconciliation is a priority. But if you want real reconciliation, then you have to do the real work of achieving it. And you have to establish some parameters. You have to put a fence around the discussion to some degree. And you don’t do that if you don’t make it clear that everyone does not have a veto.”
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General

COVID Shakespeare

Posted  March 15, 2020  by  Anonymous

What’s the difference between Covid 19 and Romeo & Juliet?

One’s a corona virus and the other is a Verona crisis.

— Julian Lee (@JulianLeeComedy) March 14, 2020

One’s a pandemic disaster, the other’s Iambic pentameter

— folb (@SleepingAnnual) March 14, 2020

Omg. Now do Two Gentlemen of Corona.

— Steve Austin from Texas (@ResistTheLiars) March 15, 2020

With jokes like that you’re just trying make us welcome death

— Tom (@_T0M_V_) March 15, 2020

ok isaac newton discovered calculus and william shakespeare wrote king lear while in quarantine but i bet none of them could eat 2 family packs of chips ahoy in 3 days while in quarantine so what the fuck

— Ryan Dils (@ryan_dils) March 15, 2020



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