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General

The next 100 years

Posted November 20, 2018 by Anonymous

A tribute placed at the Vimy Memorial

A remembrance tribute placed at the foot of the Canadian National Vimy Memorial in France ahead of this month’s centennial commemorations of the Armistice that ended the First World War. (Photo: Stephen Smith)

Writer Stephen Smith travelled through northern France as the world observed the centenary of the armistice that ended the First World War. In a series of blog posts, he shares his impressions with Canadian Geographic
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General

#646 Peeling all the dried-up glue off the lid so it looks all fresh

Posted November 20, 2018 by Anonymous

Finger-picking the sticky congealed remains off the top of the plastic glue lid sounds like no fun, but come on: it’s relatively clean and easy, satisfies some obsessive-compulsive instincts, and gives us all some smoooooooooth streaming for the rest of crafts day. AWESOME! Photo from: here — Check out my Youtube channel —

The post #646 Peeling all the dried-up glue off the lid so it looks all fresh appeared first on 1000 Awesome Things.

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General

Pick Your Poison: The Fracking Industry’s Wastewater Injection Well Problem

Posted November 19, 2018 by Anonymous

Read time: 9 mins

Oklahoma fracking industry site

The first known oil well in Oklahoma happened by accident. It was 1859 and Lewis Ross was actually drilling for saltwater (brine), not oil. Brine was highly valued at the time for the salt that could be used to preserve meat. As Ross drilled deeper for brine, he hit oil. And people have been drilling for oil in Oklahoma ever since. 

Lewis Ross might find today’s drilling landscape in the Sooner State somewhat ironic. The oil and gas industry, which has surging production due to horizontal drilling and fracking, is pumping out huge volumes of oil but even more brine. So much brine, in fact, that the fracking industry needs a way to dispose of the brine, or “produced water,” that comes out of oil and gas wells because it isn’t suitable for curing meats. In addition to salts, these wastewaters can contain naturally occurring radioactive elements and heavy metals

But the industry’s preferred approaches for disposing of fracking wastewater — pumping it underground in either deep or shallow injection wells for long-term storage — both come with serious risks for nearby communities.  

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Christmas

Overnight Cinnamon Buns

Posted November 19, 2018 by Anonymous

These Overnight Cinnamon Buns are a perfect and delicious treat to enjoy first thing in the morning.  They’re especially perfect for Christmas morning while opening up gifts!  Put some coffee on, and enjoy! Our Christmas is not complete without homemade cinnamon buns on Christmas morning. When the lights go out on Christmas Eve, these buns are rising on my counter, and first thing in the morning, I pop them into the oven. Then they’re ready to eat while we open our presents.  Best ever! I have been making these cinnamon buns for Christmas for as long as I can remember, […]

The post Overnight Cinnamon Buns appeared first on A Pretty Life In The Suburbs.

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General

The Only 46 Words Of Health Advice You’ll Ever Need

Posted November 19, 2018 by Yoni Freedhoff

[I was reminded of this piece, first published in 2015, by someone on Twitter, and given the volume of the diet wars these days, thought I’d reshare. Still holds up pretty well I think!]

In no particular order:

  • Avoid trans fats.
  • Substitute unsaturated fats for saturated if you can.
  • Cook from fresh whole ingredients.
  • Minimize restaurant and ultra-processed foods.
  • Cultivate friendships.
  • Don’t smoke.
  • Nurture sleep.
  • Drink alcohol at most moderately.
  • Exercise as often as you can enjoy
  • Only drink those calories that you love

Comparatively, everything else is minutia.

        
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General

#647 When the batteries are included

Posted November 19, 2018 by Anonymous

I’m the Robin Hood of batteries. Since I am an extremely cheap person I always rob from the rich, battery-filled remotes on my couch and give to the poor new gadgets laying on my counter. I stumble around Sherwood Living Room, clicking open plastic battery doors, hunting for dependable double-As to get the job done. […]

The post #647 When the batteries are included appeared first on 1000 Awesome Things.

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General

Matthew and Sarah Elliott: How a UK Power Couple Links US Libertarians and Fossil Fuel Lobbyists to Brexit

Posted November 18, 2018 by Anonymous

Read time: 27 mins

The Elliotts network map

If you have detected a distinctly American flavour to the rampant lobbying in Westminster corridors over a Brexit deal, there is a good reason why.

A close look at the transatlantic connections of the London-based groups pushing for the most deregulated form of Brexit reveals strong ties to major US libertarian influencers. These include fossil fuel magnates the Koch brothers — known for funding climate science denial around the world — and the man who bankrolled Donald Trump’s campaign, Robert Mercer.

At the heart of this network lies a little-known power couple, Matthew and Sarah Elliott. Together, the husband and wife team connect senior members of the Leave campaign and groups pushing a libertarian free-market ideology from offices in Westminster’s Tufton Street to major US libertarian lobbyists and funders.

Collectively, the network aims to use Brexit as an opportunity to slash regulations in the UK, paving the way for a wide-ranging USUK free-trade deal that could have disastrous consequences for the environment.

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General

#648 Getting a fly to fly outside so you don’t have to kill it

Posted November 18, 2018 by Anonymous

Sure, there may be a few tense minutes while the little rascal gets trapped between the sliding doors, but if you’re patient he’ll eventually find his way outside and you can rest feeling a little less murderery. AWESOME! Photo from: here — Check out my Youtube channel —

The post #648 Getting a fly to fly outside so you don’t have to kill it appeared first on 1000 Awesome Things.

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General

Report: 90% of Pipeline Blasts Draw No Financial Penalties

Posted November 17, 2018 by guest

Read time: 3 mins

San Bruno fire at night

By Lorraine Chow, EcoWatch. Reposted with permission from EcoWatch.

A striking report has revealed that 90 percent of the 137 interstate pipeline fires or explosions since 2010 have drawn no financial penalties for the companies responsible.

The article from E&E News reporter Mike Soraghan underscores the federal Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration’s (PHMSA) weak authority over the fossil fuel industry for these disasters.

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General

Saturday Stories: That Low-Carb Diet Study, Medical Conflicts Of Interest, Suicidal Help, And A Movember Update

Posted November 17, 2018 by Yoni Freedhoff

Julia Belluz, in Vox, with the best coverage of that new low-carb diet study that has everyone talking.

John Mandrola, in Medscape, reflects on conflicts of interest in medicine

Jason Cherkis, in Highline, on, “the best way to save people from suicide

[And finally huge thanks to those who’ve already donated to my Movember fundraising efforts. Thanks to your generosity, I’m just a $211 shy of my $4,500 goal! If you find this blog valuable, if you enjoy these weekend shares, a tax-deductible donation would be very welcome, all you need to do is click here]

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General

#649 Taking indoor furniture outdoors

Posted November 17, 2018 by Anonymous

Forget picnic tables, plastic chairs, and patio sets. No, we’re talking about the real deal. We’re talking about moving furniture from inside your pad to outside of it, and busting the shackles of climate control in favor of fresh air and a rocking good time. Feel these beats: 1. Porch Couch. Sure, your worn out […]

The post #649 Taking indoor furniture outdoors appeared first on 1000 Awesome Things.

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General

What Terrible Injustices Are Hiding Behind American Energy Habits?

Posted November 16, 2018 by Anonymous

Read time: 7 mins

Wayuu woman makes soup in La Guajira, Colombia

When someone charges a cellphone or flips on the lights, what costs are felt by the far-off communities that produced the coal or gas powering that home? What happens to those same communities when a utility decides to switch from coal power to natural gas? And what keeps these impacts of American energy habits hidden from view?   

New research helps provide some clarity. A study led by Noel Healy from Salem State University in Massachusetts analyzes the hidden but interconnected injustices that can occur throughout the world’s fossil fuel supply chains.

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Christmas

Cozy Gift Ideas for Her

Posted November 16, 2018 by Anonymous

To help you with gift giving this holiday season, I’m sharing some of my favourite Cozy Gift Ideas for the women in your life! Every year I like to put together gift guides as a way to give ideas and inspiration to you for your holiday shopping.  It can be tough to find the right gifts for the people in our lives, so if I can help you out in any way, I will.  So this year I’ve put together a list of cozy gift ideas for the women in your life…moms, sisters, wives and friends…I hope you find some […]

The post Cozy Gift Ideas for Her appeared first on A Pretty Life In The Suburbs.

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General

An asteroid impact on Greenland left a massive crater under the ice

Posted November 16, 2018 by Anonymous

First-ever discovery of a crater under an ice sheet

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General

Will coral reef islands rise or fall? It’s a greenhouse-gas paradox

Posted November 16, 2018 by Anonymous

Coral reef islands may rise up against climate change

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General

How moths evolved a kind of stealth jet technology to sneak past bats

Posted November 16, 2018 by Anonymous

How moths use stealth jet technology to sneak past bats

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General

Tiny people have evolved in rainforests because it’s where tiny steps are better

Posted November 16, 2018 by Anonymous

Rainforest people have evolved to be small because jungle walking is hard

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General

The mysteries of animal movement – how they walk on water and climb up walls

Posted November 16, 2018 by Anonymous

Walking on water and climbing up walls – how animals do it

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General

What are the visible changes in the night sky in the last 3,000 years?

Posted November 16, 2018 by Anonymous

The position of the pole star has shifted as the Earth’s axis moved.

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General

Le programme révolutionnaire qui a contribué au rôle déterminant du Canada en matière de science de l’Arctique

Posted November 16, 2018 by Anonymous

How the Northern Scientific Training Program helped make Canada an Arctic science heavyweight

Une subvention du PFSN a aidé Ann Balasubramaniam à se rendre dans le nord du Yukon en 2008, alors qu’elle était étudiante au doctorat, pour mener des recherches sur les écosystèmes d’eau douce en collaboration avec la Première Nation Vuntut Gwitchin. Balasubramaniam, qu’on voit ici prélever des échantillons d’eau du lac Mary Netro avec Devon Kyikavichik, travaille aujourd’hui pour Savoir Polaire Canada à Cambridge Bay, au Nunavut. (Photo : Ann Balasubramaniam)

Il y a maintenant près de 60 ans, un programme fédéral peu connu a commencé à offrir aux étudiants des universités canadiennes une rare occasion de voyager dans l’Arctique ou la région subarctique afin d’acquérir une expérience pratique en recherche et une compréhension d’une partie du pays que la plupart d’entre nous ne verrons jamais. En plus de changer la vie de milliers d’étudiants, le programme a contribué à faire du Canada une puissance de la recherche nordique.

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General

The groundbreaking program that helped make Canada an Arctic science heavyweight

Posted November 16, 2018 by Anonymous

An NSTP grant helped Ann Balasubramaniam go to northern Yukon in 2008, when she was a doctoral student, to collaborate on freshwater ecosystem research with the Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation. Balasubramaniam, shown taking water samples on Mary Netro …

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General

A Witness to the Disappearing Wonder of Wild Orcas

Posted November 16, 2018 by Anonymous

Read time: 4 mins

A pod of orcas at sunset

I never thought I’d live to see an orca in the wild, a sobering prospect for someone in her 30s living in the Pacific Northwest. Or rather, I never thought the orcas would live long enough for me to see them in the wild.

I’m not talking about meeting just any orcas; I wanted to meet my orcas, the 74 remaining endangered Southern Residents who call the busy, steely blue waters of the Salish Sea their home.

In this corner of the cold Pacific Ocean spanning Washington and British Columbia, the Southern Resident orcas face more challenges than most, faring worse even than their nearby neighbors, the Northern Resident community, similar orcas who live similar salmon-eating lives farther north along the Pacific Coast.

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General

#650 The first few hours of the road trip

Posted November 16, 2018 by Anonymous

Full boxes of granola bars, fresh mix tapes, and the heady thrill of anticipation get your body ready for a nice long ride. AWESOME!     Photo from: here — Want to read more? Check out my podcast 3 Books or join my book club! —

The post #650 The first few hours of the road trip appeared first on 1000 Awesome Things.

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General

It’s time to listen to the Inuit on climate change

Posted November 15, 2018 by Anonymous

When it comes to climate change, what happens in the Arctic does not stay in the Arctic. (Photo: Andrew Lovesey/Canadian Geographic)

When other regions of Canada and world are struck with major environmental and natural disasters, communities, fir…

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General

Time and the war

Posted November 15, 2018 by Anonymous

St. Symphorien Cemetery, east of Mons, was established by the German Army in 1914 after the opening salvoes of the First World War. Private John Parr, the first British soldier to be killed on the Western Front, is buried here. So too is Private George Price, from Falmouth, Nova Scotia, who’s recognized as the last soldier of the British Empire to die in the First World War — at 10:58 on the morning of November 11, 1918. St. Symphorien contains the graves of 284 German soldiers along with 227 British, and t

St. Symphorien Cemetery, east of Mons, was established by the German Army in 1914 after the opening salvoes of the First World War. Private John Parr, the first British soldier to be killed on the Western Front, is buried here. So too is Private George Price, from Falmouth, Nova Scotia, who’s recognized as the last soldier of the British Empire to die in the First World War — at 10:58 on the morning of November 11, 1918. St. Symphorien contains the graves of 284 German soldiers along with 227 British, and two Canadians. (Photo: Stephen Smith)

Writer Stephen Smith travelled through northern France as the world observed the centenary of the armistice that ended the First World War. In a series of blog posts, he shares his impressions with Canadian Geographic

“It is the wound in Time.”

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General

Brazil’s New Foreign Minister is a Climate Science Denier

Posted November 15, 2018 by guest

Read time: 3 mins

By Karl Mathiesen, Climate Home News

Brazil’s president-elect Jair Bolsonaro has named an anti-globalist diplomat to lead on foreign affairs and his country’s relationship to the Paris Agreement.

Ernesto Araújo has praised US president Donald Trump and accused the political left of appropriating climate change to serve an ideological agenda. He currently runs Brazil’s US and Canada department, a relatively junior position in the foreign service, and only became an ambassador this year.

On Twitter announcing his new minister, Bolsonaro called Araújo a “brilliant intellectual”.

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General

#651 When your phone rings and it’s someone you were just thinking about

Posted November 15, 2018 by Anonymous

Faces float and fly through our brains. Kicking pebbles, wearing backpacks, laughing about the school day, your friends flicker past you with red cheeks and windswept hair on cool and crisp walks home. Silverware clinking, gravy boats dripping, your family sits in thick holiday sweaters under a sparkly chandelier amongst half-filled wine glasses and steamy […]

The post #651 When your phone rings and it’s someone you were just thinking about appeared first on 1000 Awesome Things.

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General

Making Visible the Globe-warming Gases of the Permian’s Fracking Boom

Posted November 14, 2018 by Julie Dermansky

Read time: 10 mins

Sharon Wilson with her FLIR camera at a fracking site and a methane flare in the background

There is an LED sign at a Chase Bank in downtown Midland, Texas, the heart of the Permian Basin, which quantifies the current oil boom. It alternates between current rig count, the price of oil, and the price of gasoline. On October 30, the day I arrived, the sign informed me there were 1,068 drilling rigs across the United States, of which 489 — nearly half — are in the Permian Basin.

Though the flashing sign is meant to celebrate the fracking boom, Sharon Wilson, Texas coordinator of Earthworks, sees it as a warning sign of the urgent need to cut greenhouse gas emissions to avoid catastrophic climate change.

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Christmas

Holiday Baking Music Playlist

Posted November 14, 2018 by Anonymous

Holiday Baking Music Playlist

This Holiday Baking Music Playlist provides over 2 hours of music with 40+ holiday songs.  Enough time to press play and get those Christmas cookies made and into the oven! When I’m baking during the holiday season, I absolutely need to have Christmas music playing. I love to sing and swing around the kitchen while I’m mixing batters and doughs…why not?  It’s the merriest time of year and I embrace it with all I have!  So I’ve put together a fun collection of songs, ranging from old favourites to some fantastic new ones (hello Ingrid Michaelson!!).  Press play and let’s […]

The post Holiday Baking Music Playlist appeared first on A Pretty Life In The Suburbs.

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General

Fisheries Minister Jonathan Wilkinson on the future of Canada’s oceans

Posted November 14, 2018 by Anonymous

Minister Wilkinson

Jonathan Wilkinson, Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard, announces a $1 million investment in environmental response equipment in Victoria in September 2018. (Photo: Office of the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans)

No shortage of action: that sums up the first few months of federal Minister of Fisheries and Oceans Jonathan Wilkinson’s tenure in the portfolio.

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General

#652 Using any long and thin item you can reach to grab the remote control so you don’t actually have to get up

Posted November 14, 2018 by Anonymous

Dusty sunbeams streak through the window while you lay on the couch in a blissful half-asleep cocoon. Sometimes during this hazy daze a little voice in your brain politely asks that the TV be turned down or shut right off. In moments like this there’s something satisfying about keeping as much of your body completely […]

The post #652 Using any long and thin item you can reach to grab the remote control so you don’t actually have to get up appeared first on 1000 Awesome Things.

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General

The Christian Vacation Camp Where Kids Are Taught by Notorious Climate Science Deniers

Posted November 13, 2018 by Graham Readfearn

Read time: 4 mins

Lord Monckton

Each morning at Camp Constitution’s summer camp, the kids and parents go off to classes while staff members do a room inspection.

What we look for is not just cleanliness, but a patriotic and Godly theme,” says camp director Hal Shurtleff in a video of the 2016 camp.

We are looking for creativity — are they learning what we are teaching them?”

And what are they being taught? Conspiracy theories about the United Nations (UN) and how climate change is a hoax, and they’ve drafted in two of the world’s most notorious climate science denialists to do the job.

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Christmas

Easy Christmas Gumdrop Nougat Candy

Posted November 13, 2018 by Anonymous

This Christmas Gumdrop Nougat Candy is an easy no-bake treat that’s perfect for the holiday season.  Great as a homemade gift! These Gumdrop Nougat Candies taste like nostalgia and Christmas’ past.  And I love them.  They’re sweet, soft, chewy and so delicious.  And very easy to make.  Create a batch and share them with friends, give them as gifts, and make sure to have them on your holiday treat plate! Who knew that marshmallows + white chocolate chips = a chewy and delicious nougat?!  And with festive red and green gumdrops, this is a perfect Christmas treat. I love that […]

The post Easy Christmas Gumdrop Nougat Candy appeared first on A Pretty Life In The Suburbs.

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General

#653 Scoring a compliment on your new haircut

Posted November 13, 2018 by Anonymous

Haircuts are stressful. Come on, there are at least 3 Major Worries when you go get your lid trimmed: 1. Disappearing Choppers. Have you ever gone to your regular place and found your go-to person suddenly missing? Brother, that’s a bombshell. Plus, the gang left over can be pretty tight-lipped on details, too. No forwarding […]

The post #653 Scoring a compliment on your new haircut appeared first on 1000 Awesome Things.

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Exercise

It Takes the Former Global Senior Director of the Gatorade Sports Science Institute Just 42s To Summarize Why You Almost Certainly Don’t Need Sports Drinks

Posted November 12, 2018 by Yoni Freedhoff

I caught this video a week or so ago.

It features one of the world’s most prominent sports nutrition scientists, Asker Jeukendrup, answering the question,

“What is the shortest duration of exercise where eating or drinking is worthwhile?”

The answer?

It was refreshing to hear (see what I did there), especially given Dr. Jeukendrup’s prior role as the Global Senior Director of the Gatorade Sports Science Institute (GSSI), that if your workout is less than 45 minutes (and by exercise he clarifies, “all out exercise, not easy running”) you need nothing. And if it’s 45 minutes to an hour and 15 minutes, a “mouth rinse” will do.

Wish that were printed in bold on the sides of Gatorade bottles, or that their bottles were mouth-rinsed sized!

And of course this all reminded me of that time back in 2012 when I tried to create my own homemade version of Powerade after the then Senior Vice President of Coca-Cola’s sparkling beverages division told the media that after her son’s lacrosse practices, she took him to McDonald’s for a 32oz of the stuff. Watching it I also had to wonder, “Did I even lift?” (not as much back then, no)

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General

#654 Peeling that thin plastic film off anything

Posted November 12, 2018 by Anonymous

Welcome to the world, remote control. We’re happy to have you with us, laptop monitor. You’re free, cellphone. AWESOME! Photo from: here — Follow me on Instagram —

The post #654 Peeling that thin plastic film off anything appeared first on 1000 Awesome Things.

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Christmas

Christmas Grapevine Evergreen Wreath

Posted November 11, 2018 by Anonymous

With just a few simple and inexpensive supplies, it’s easy to make your own Christmas Grapevine Evergreen Wreath!  This is a gorgeous holiday statement for your door! Last week I made my annual trek to Jasper with my Mom for Christmas in November…my favourite event of the year.  This magical event kicks off the Christmas season for me and gets me inspired to MAKE ALL THE THINGS for the holidays, both food and crafts.  And this year, I left mega-inspired and ready to create.  First up, a wreath.  A gigantic, festive and gorgeous wreath. I got home on Thursday night […]

The post Christmas Grapevine Evergreen Wreath appeared first on A Pretty Life In The Suburbs.

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General

Let the quiet have its say

Posted November 11, 2018 by Anonymous

Canadian National Vimy Memorial monument with sheep grazing

A placid view of the fields outlying Walter Allward’s magnificent Vimy Memorial, but this, too, is true: this land and much more here is fenced off from human tread, due to the lingering dangers of undetonated explosives. (Photo: Stephen Smith)

Writer Stephen Smith is travelling through northern France as the world observes the centenary of the armistice that ended the First World War. In a series of blog posts, he shares his impressions with Canadian Geographic
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General

#655 Getting to your movie seat just as the previews are starting

Posted November 11, 2018 by Anonymous

Plop down on those fat plushy seats, take a long drag of ice-cold cola, and let your eyes adjust to the big flickering screen. Slideshow guessing games and car commercials are long gone and now only the good stuff awaits. Time to get into it, get comfortable, and get your brain ready for a couple […]

The post #655 Getting to your movie seat just as the previews are starting appeared first on 1000 Awesome Things.

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General

Saturday Stories: On Anne Frank, The Hero Chiune Sugihara, Post-Antibiotics, And A Movember Update

Posted November 10, 2018 by Yoni Freedhoff

Dana Horn, in the Smithsonian Magazine, with an important read on Anne Frank and what might have been had she not been murdered.

David Wolpe, in The New York Times, about a here you’ve likely never heard of, Chiune Sugihara

Maryn McKenna, in Wired, with more on the post-antibiotic era.

[And finally huge thanks to those who’ve already donated to my Movember fundraising efforts. Thanks to your generosity, I’m more than 2/3rds of the way to my $4,500 goal. If you find this blog valuable, if you enjoy these weekend shares, a tax-deductible donation would be very welcome, all you need to do is click here]

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