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The Indigenous Writer Advantage

Posted February 23, 2017 by Anonymous

I always knew I was an indigenous writer, and early on I discovered the path to becoming a writer starts with reading everything including crap.

The post The Indigenous Writer Advantage appeared first on Indian Country Media Network.

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The Indigenous Writer Advantage

Posted February 23, 2017 by Anonymous

I always knew I was an indigenous writer, and early on I discovered the path to becoming a writer starts with reading everything including crap.

The post The Indigenous Writer Advantage appeared first on Indian Country Media Network.

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Street Artists BirdO and Getso Mess with Our Heads at Honest Ed’s Farewell Party

Posted February 23, 2017 by Anonymous

Muralist BirdO and graffiti artist Getso join forces to mess with our heads as a final farewell to Toronto landmark, Honest Ed’s.

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Street Artists BirdO and Getso Mess with Our Heads at Honest Ed’s Farewell Party

Posted February 23, 2017 by Anonymous

Muralist BirdO and graffiti artist Getso join forces to mess with our heads as a final farewell to Toronto landmark, Honest Ed’s.

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The App That Lets You Buy and Sell Memes to Become the Next ‘Wolf of Meme Street’

Posted February 23, 2017 by Anonymous

MemeBroker is sort of like Tinder but for the meme enthusiast. Users can buy, sell and invest in memes in the hopes of growing their portfolio. Motherboard’s Jordan Pearson tells us how the app works.

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The App That Lets You Buy and Sell Memes to Become the Next ‘Wolf of Meme Street’

Posted February 23, 2017 by Anonymous

MemeBroker is sort of like Tinder but for the meme enthusiast. Users can buy, sell and invest in memes in the hopes of growing their portfolio. Motherboard’s Jordan Pearson tells us how the app works.

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‘The Joke’s on Us’: We Hang Out with the Creators of ‘Nirvanna the Band the Show’

Posted February 23, 2017 by Anonymous

We met the guys behind ‘Nirvanna the Band the Show’ in a skyhigh restaurant to talk about pushing the ethical boundaries in the name of storytelling.

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‘The Joke’s on Us’: We Hang Out with the Creators of ‘Nirvanna the Band the Show’

Posted February 23, 2017 by Anonymous

We met the guys behind ‘Nirvanna the Band the Show’ in a skyhigh restaurant to talk about pushing the ethical boundaries in the name of storytelling.

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8 Reasons Why Feminism Matters in Indian Country

Posted February 23, 2017 by Christina Rose

ICTMN has gathered the thoughts of six women for whom tradition and feminism come naturally. All share their thoughts about feminism in Indian country

The post 8 Reasons Why Feminism Matters in Indian Country appeared first on Indian Country Media Network.

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8 Reasons Why Feminism Matters in Indian Country

Posted February 23, 2017 by Christina Rose

ICTMN has gathered the thoughts of six women for whom tradition and feminism come naturally. All share their thoughts about feminism in Indian country

The post 8 Reasons Why Feminism Matters in Indian Country appeared first on Indian Country Media Network.

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Robbie Williams: The Great British Pop Star Who Will Never Go Away

Posted February 22, 2017 by Noisey

He’s been on ‘Eastenders’. He has a road and tourist trail named after him in Stoke-on-Trent. He, quite simply, just won’t leave.

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Why Self-Driving Cars Could Be a Dream Come True for Car Thieves

Posted February 22, 2017 by Anonymous

Vehicles that stop for pedestrians could be a gift to thieves.

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Crime

People Tell Us the Most Embarrassing Scams They’ve Fallen For

Posted February 22, 2017 by Anonymous

There’s a sucker born every minute.

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Animals

No, Your Cat Is Not Making You Crazy

Posted February 22, 2017 by Anonymous

A new study found that a common parasite often spread by cats is not to blame for the development of mental health issues.

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How This South African Dairy Is Fighting Gender-Based Violence

Posted February 22, 2017 by Anonymous

Orange Grove Dairy in the South African town of Dundee donates surplus dairy goods to the local women’s center, providing meals for hundreds of people a week.

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The Trump Administration’s New Deportation Policy Could Create a Migrant Crisis in Tijuana

Posted February 22, 2017 by Anonymous

By sending migrants back across the southern border, the US will just be worsening conditions in northern Mexico, say immigration advocates.

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Entertainment

A Timeline of Controversial Statements at the Oscars

Posted February 22, 2017 by Anonymous

From Marlon Brando to Halle Berry, many Academy Awards winners have dedicated their acceptance speeches to standing up for social justice.

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It’s Time For Ontario To Cap All Classrooms At 20 Students

Posted February 22, 2017 by Anonymous

I don’t want a four per cent raise. I want better learning conditions for our students and better working conditions for us. Most of all, I want to work on regaining the trust of the public again. Ontario has the greatest sub sovereign debt in the wo…

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Solidarity With Muslims Must Last Long After The Headlines Fade

Posted February 22, 2017 by Anonymous

The vigils held across Canada in the aftermath of the Québec City mosque shooting were beautiful. Watching on my computer screen from my temporary home in the United Kingdom, I felt I was missing something profoundly Canadian as thousands of people from around the country turned out in the bitter cold to stand in solidarity with Canadian Muslims.

Every few minutes, the feed I was watching flicked to a new city. Québec, where the melted wax of hundreds of burning candles cascaded down a snow bank dotted with flowers and notes of condolence. Montréal, where mittened hands held up messages of support that were partly obscured by wisps of breath mingling in the frigid air. Toronto, where candlelight glistened off tearful faces framed with toques and scarves, sometimes pulled over hijabs. Winnipeg, Calgary, Vancouver, Iqaluit. For one rare moment in this vast and diverse country of ours, Canadians everywhere came together to assert our unity in the face of an attack that sought to tear us apart.

mosque attack vigil
Quebecers gather on Jan. 30, 2017 to pay respect to the victims of terror attack at a mosque in Canada’s Quebec City, Canada. (Photo: Amru Salahuddien/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

And now, with the last candles extinguished, the country will move on. The vigils will end. The cameras will stop rolling. The faces of the victims will disappear from our newsfeeds, though the face of the accused may linger a few weeks longer. And bit by bit, the tragedy will fade from the national memory.

This is the familiar script of tragedy. People die. People grieve. People forget. And then, sometimes, people remember again, belatedly realizing that the tragedy was an early sign of a troubling trend when a similar incident occurs years later.

But for the first time that I can recall, Canadians are not following the normal script. The usual outpouring of grief has been tinged with anger, disgust and more than a hint of shame. The harmonious façade we fooled ourselves into believing was shattered, and this has forced many of us to recognize that the supposedly open and welcoming Canada we cherish is not the same Canada that millions of marginalized Canadians experience every day.


We often let our politicians get away with potentially radicalizing rhetoric merely because we assume that their white target audience isn’t dangerous.

This acknowledgment of our country’s demons is long overdue. When confronted with a tragedy, it can be reflexive to pin the evil on those whom we already hate. It is more difficult to acknowledge that it might have originated in people or places that we love. But it is in Canada that hate crimes against Muslims have more than doubled over the past three years, and it is Canadians who hold a 54 per cent negative view of Islam. It was a Canadian prime minister who implied that Canadian mosques are breeding grounds for Islamic extremists, a Canadian legislator who claimed that niqabs needed to be banned because they could be used to hide lethal weapons, and a Canadian town that adopted a bylaw prohibiting the stoning of women in public (as if that weren’t already illegal).

Similar Islamophobic policies and attitudes have proliferated throughout the Western world, and Canadians are no more or less virtuous than citizens of any other country. But if we are to combat the culture that fostered the Québec shooter’s poisonous ideology, we must own up to the fact that bit by bit, our actions and words — and inaction and silence — have fashioned a culture that, if not overtly Islamophobic, has certainly been permissive of Islamophobic ideology.

The good news is that constructing a national character is a dynamic and continuous process. Just as we constructed a culture that is permissive of Islamophobia, so we can tear it down.


Our newfound solidarity must be more than just a response to an unspeakable tragedy.

We can start by emphatically speaking back against the dog-whistle Islamophobia that pervades our everyday discourse. When we stay silent in the face of Islamophobic rhetoric, we tacitly agree to the moral relegation of Muslims, and it is this dehumanization that validates the destructive views of people like the Québec shooter.

Our silence also sustains the superficial view of Muslims that predominates in the public imagination. There are over a million Muslims in Canada, but we don’t speak to them as parents, lovers, students, mentors, artists or community activists. Instead, when we talk about Muslims it is almost always in relation to terrorism or “reasonable accommodation,” which in turn reinforces the mistaken belief that radicalization is an exclusively Muslim phenomenon.

Over the past 30 years, there have been 120 violent events in Canada perpetrated by white supremacists and only seven by Islamic extremists, but we don’t have the same conversations about the radicalization of young white men that we do about the radicalization of young brown and black men. This racially warped view of the biggest threats to Canadian security means that we often let our politicians get away with potentially radicalizing rhetoric merely because we assume that their white target audience isn’t dangerous.

kellie leitch
Conservative leadership candidate Kellie Leitch. (Photo: CP)

This has been demonstrated most recently by our tepid response to Kellie Leitch, who is trying to catapult herself to the leadership of the federal Conservative Party by openly courting racists and proposing dog-whistle “anti-Canadian values screening” for new immigrants.

While Leitch has tried to distance herself from her earlier rhetoric in the aftermath the Québec attack by belatedly mentioning that her values test wouldn’t only apply to Muslims, her vehement opposition to the government’s Motion 103 condemning Islamophobia — complete with a stock photo of a gagged model whose brown eyes were digitally altered to Aryan blue — clearly reveals who it is she’s really targeting. The words of our leaders help shape the character of our society, and we have not been forceful enough in our denunciations of Canadian politicians who seek to exploit fear and prejudice for their own personal political gain.

The simple fact is that we haven’t done enough. We haven’t done enough make Canadian multiculturalism more than a hollow façade, and we bear collective responsibility for tolerating a culture from which hateful ideologies can emerge and grow. But the unyielding solidarity of Canadians over the past few weeks has given me hope. Hope that this solidarity can be the foundation for a radically inclusive society, and hope that this time “we’re sorry” is an acknowledgment of our faults and a promise to do better, rather than just an empty platitude. If we really want to build a better Canada, our newfound solidarity must be more than just a response to an unspeakable tragedy.

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The Verdant Fist That Is the Mescalero Apache Reservation

Posted February 22, 2017 by Anonymous

The 463,000-acre Mescalero Apache Reservation in New Mexico is a hidden gem that might be one of the Southwest’s best-kept secrets.

The post The Verdant Fist That Is the Mescalero Apache Reservation appeared first on Indian Country Media Network.

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ISIS Stole This Family’s Home, Don’t Let It Take Their Baby’s Life

Posted February 22, 2017 by Anonymous

In March 2014, Mustafa heard three bombs near his home in Sheran located in the province of Aleppo, Syria. At that precise moment, he knew his biggest fear was real: ISIS was at their door. This was his tipping point; his family packed a few belongings…

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What Happened To The Country That Welcomed My Immigrant Grandparents

Posted February 22, 2017 by Anonymous

A Syrian refugee holds his daughter as they arrive at the Pearson Toronto International Airport in Mississauga, Ontario, Dec. 18, 2015. (Mark Blinch/Reuters)

When Canada is described as a “nation of immigrants,” it’s not an exaggeration. I know that …

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You Don’t Have To Choose Between Alt-Right And Regressive Left

Posted February 22, 2017 by Anonymous

I know — everyone is tired of talking about identity politics — and for good reason.

It’s a poison pill in an already toxic landscape, a conch for the left and a stone in the shoe for the right. It’s where political correctness goes to thrive or be …

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Five Charged With Selling Fake Native American Jewelry

Posted February 22, 2017 by Alysa Landry

Five individuals are being charged with violating the Indian Arts and Crafts Act after allegedly importing and selling fake Native American jewelry.

The post Five Charged With Selling Fake Native American Jewelry appeared first on Indian Country Media Network.

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World Goes Wild for ‘Raw, In-Your-Face’ Native Pop Art

Posted February 22, 2017 by Anonymous

Native Pop is a traveling showcase of today’s most progressive Indian pop artists representing a diverse spectrum of tribal heritages.

The post World Goes Wild for ‘Raw, In-Your-Face’ Native Pop Art appeared first on Indian Country Media Network.

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If Trudeau Really Blames Corporate Elites, Why Did He Sign CETA?

Posted February 22, 2017 by Daniel Tencer

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, bedecked in tuxedo and tails, stood before a crowd of some of Europe’s richest and most powerful people last week and told them to get in touch with the middle class.

“It’s time to pay a living wage, to pay your taxes and give your workers the benefits — and peace of mind — that come with stable, full-time contracts,” Trudeau told the St. Matthews gala dinner crowd in Hamburg, Germany.

Trudeau wasn’t entirely blind to the context of his speech.

justin trudeau hamburg
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau gestures as he speaks during the traditional banquet “Matthiae-Mahlzeit” (St. Matthew’s Day Banquet) at the town hall in Hamburg, Germany Feb. 17, 2017. (Photo: Morris Mac Matzen/Reuters)

“I fully appreciate the irony of preaching about the struggles of the middle class to a sea of tuxedos and ball gowns, while wearing a bow-tie myself,” he said. “But this discussion needs to happen.”

Still, Trudeau missed another irony here, a much bigger one. Just days before the prime minister spoke in Hamburg, the European Parliament voted in favour of approving CETA, the Canada-EU free trade deal.

Even though the Trudeau government and EU officials have been calling CETA the “most progressive” free trade deal ever, none of those progressive issues Trudeau mentioned were addressed in it.

The deal does not require the payment of living wages; it does not mandate a crackdown on tax evasion; and it certainly does not try to guarantee the “peace of mind … that come[s] with stable, full-time contracts.”

(In fact, if anything, Trudeau’s Liberals have been telling Canadians the opposite — that we are going to have to get used to precarious work.)

Do Trudeau and his cabinet ministers really believe that a trade deal negotiated by Harper is “progressive?”

A new study from UN researcher Pierre Kohler and Delft University economist Servaas Storm forecasts that efficiencies and competitive pressures created by CETA will result in there being fewer jobs across the trade area.

They predict the whole trade area will see employment reduced by about 227,000 jobs, with 23,000 of those lost in Canada and the rest in Europe. That will depress wages so that, by 2023, the average Canadian worker will be foregoing $2,460 in lost income due to lower wages.

But what’s bad for the middle class, in this case, is good for business. The same study found that CETA will result in a shift of income from employees to business owners and shareholders of around 1.6 percentage points. At current income levels, that’s a shift of $24 billion annually from employees to owners. Quite a notable increase in wealth inequality is likely to follow.

If this trade deal doesn’t appear as “progressive” as it may seem, maybe that has something to do with the fact that almost all of it was negotiated on Canada’s behalf by the previous Conservative government led by Stephen Harper. There certainly weren’t many pronouncements about CETA being a “progressive” trade deal back in 2013, when Harper signed it.

Do Trudeau and his cabinet ministers really believe that a trade deal negotiated by Harper is “progressive?” It seems unlikely. More likely is that they are hoping people don’t realize this was a made-by-Harper trade deal, and are just aiming for a political victory that makes it seem the Liberals are pushing in the opposite direction of the U.S.’s protectionist new president.

justin trudeau hamburg
The dining room at Hamburg’s city hall, where Prime Minister Justin Trudeau addressed a crowd of business leaders and policymakers on the need to create an economy that works for a greater number of people. Hamburg, Feb. 17, 2017. (Photo: Morris Mac Matzen/Reuters)

Trudeau is indeed fashioning himself as the “anti-Trump” — a term German newspaper Die Welt even used to describe him during his visit. Trudeau has suggested that CETA — as a symbol of openness and internationalism — is an antidote to the protectionism and xenophobia embodied in Trump’s electoral win.

But he seems to have forgotten that Trump rode to the White House on (among other things) a wave of anti-free trade sentiment among regions that have been “losers” in globalization, such as the U.S. Midwest.

Many progressive economists point to the past three decades of free trade as being one major cause of the economic struggles faced by the middle class in Europe and North America. Given this recent forecast, CETA is unlikely to change that trend.

It’s precisely trends like this that helped Trump tap into middle-class alienation and ride a wave of frustration into the White House, and Trudeau is among the many who have noticed and addressed this.

But unfortunately, Trudeau’s words don’t match his actions — at least not yet. In this age of political upheaval, confusion abounds, so we can forgive the prime minister for grabbing on to whatever looked liked “not Trump.”

But that won’t do in the long run. Sooner or later, Trudeau is going to have to get the memo — corporatism is a seed of Trumpism, not its antidote.

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Thousands of Emails from Oklahoma Office of Trump EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt Published

Posted February 22, 2017 by Steve Horn

By Steve Horn, Sharon Kelly and Graham Readfearn

The Center for Media and Democracy (CMD) has published thousands of emails obtained from the office of former Oklahoma Attorney General, Scott Pruitt, who was recently sworn in as the head of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the Trump Administration. 

Housed online in searchable form by CMD, the emails cover Pruitt’s time spent as the Sooner State’s lead legal advocate, and in particular show a “close and friendly relationship between Scott Pruitt’s office and the fossil fuel industry,” CMD said in a press release. CMD was forced to go to court in Oklahoma to secure the release of the emails, which had sat in a queue for two years after the organization had filed an open records request.

Among other things, the emails show extensive communication with hydraulic fracturing (“fracking”) giant Devon Energy, with Pruitt’s office not only involved in discussions with Devon about energy-related issues like proposed U.S. Bureau of Land Management fracking rules, but also more tangential matters like how a proposed airline merger might affect Devon’s international travel costs. They also show a close relationship with groups such as the Koch Industries-funded Americans for Prosperity and the Oklahoma Public Policy Council, the latter a member of the influential conservative State Policy Network (SPN).

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In a First, Brother and Sister Win at Hoop Dance World Championship

Posted February 22, 2017 by Anonymous

The Heard Museum Hoop Dance World Championship winners this year included a brother and sister as champions: Tyrese and Kailayne Jensen.

The post In a First, Brother and Sister Win at Hoop Dance World Championship appeared first on Indian Country Media Network.

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UK Climate Deniers Take Anti-Science Message to Trump Administration at CPAC 2017

Posted February 22, 2017 by Anonymous
Donald Trump addressing the CPAC conference

Two fringe British climate science deniers are heading to Maryland to see Donald Trump and his tea party pals this week, taking their Brexit-inflected anti-science agenda with them.

Trump’s golden elevator buddy and UKIP MEP, Nigel Farage, and far-right Breitbart London commentator, James Delingpole, are both due to appear at the American Conservative Union’s annual Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC), starting today.

CPAC claims to be the “birthplace of modern conservatism”, and aims to “break through the resistance of Washington’s powerful elites” via four-days of talks and activist training. In recent years it has been seen as a breeding ground for Tea Party ideas and activism.

The conference will offer Farage and Delingpole an opportunity to network with other members of a USUK climate science denial network linked to Brexit and Trump, previously mapped by DeSmog UK.

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Congress Runs Amok While We Watch Trump Play a Magician

Posted February 22, 2017 by Anonymous

Like a good magician President Donald Trump has diverted the attention of the country to his travel ban while real laws are facing termination.

The post Congress Runs Amok While We Watch Trump Play a Magician appeared first on Indian Country Media Network.

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Cahokia, America’s Great City

Posted February 22, 2017 by Guest Author

Were inhabitants of Cahokia trading with Toltec Mexico? What happened to the great city near present-day St. Louis?

The post Cahokia, America’s Great City appeared first on Indian Country Media Network.

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Caring for Our Own: Study Nursing at Montana State University

Posted February 22, 2017 by Anonymous

Montana State University’s Caring for Our Own Program trains Native American and Alaska Natives entering the nursing field.

The post Caring for Our Own: Study Nursing at Montana State University appeared first on Indian Country Media Network.

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Canada Visits Sweden To Talk About Inclusiveness

Posted February 22, 2017 by Anonymous

The ovation lasted a full three minutes, and boy, was it loud.

What ovation, you ask? I’m referring to the one given just over a month ago in Ottawa, Canada to Sweden native and former Ottawa Senators captain Daniel Alfredsson, whose No. 11 jersey was recently retired by the team. Thousands attended the ceremony, and thousands cheered loudly.

It was an emotional moment for the Alfredsson family and for the people of Ottawa, who have adopted ‘Alfie’ as one of their own. Both on and off the ice he has given so much to the community and to Canada, and we were very proud to welcome him as a Canadian citizen last year.

Why do I share this story? For several reasons. One, because Daniel Alfredsson is back in Sweden this week as a delegate on our Canadian State visit.

As Canada’s 28th Governor General, I often travel abroad and represent our country on behalf of Canadians, and that’s what we’re doing this week in Stockholm, Malmö, Lund and Gothenburg. Our visit themes are inclusiveness, innovation and sustainability.

2017-02-21-1487715512-9699865-GG0520170065002.jpg

Governor General David Johnston and Daniel Alfredsson put on their skates to enjoy the outdoor skating rink at Kungsträdgarden in Stockholm. (Photo: David Johnston)

The second reason I mention Daniel Alfredsson is because, as a Swedish-Canadian citizen, he’s part of a long line of what we sometimes call ‘hyphenated Canadians’. In fact, our delegation to Sweden is comprised of Canadians who have backgrounds from all over the world.

Ms. Alia Hogben of the Canadian Council of Muslim Women was born in Myanmar and is of Indian Muslim descent. Mr. Naheed Nenshi is the mayor of Calgary, which makes him the first Muslim mayor of a large North American city. I myself am proud to have Scottish roots, and to call myself Canadian.

Immigration is a basic fact of Canada, as old as the country itself. Indigenous peoples were the first inhabitants of our land, followed by generations of newcomers who came in search of peace and prosperity. This continues to the present day with the arrival of immigrants and refugees from around the world.

Newcomers are a source of strength for Canada. Everything in our history shows this to be the case. Diversity is a source of insight, ideas and energy that deepens our ability to solve problems and to engage with the world.

This is not to say our commitment to diversity and multiculturalism is easy. As the appalling attack on a mosque in Québec City earlier this month showed, Canada is not immune to racism, hatred and violence. Our response must be to strongly condemn hatred and violence and to reaffirm our commitment to diversity, tolerance and inclusiveness.

The importance of inclusiveness cannot be overstated. It’s the glue that holds us together, and only when all members of a society share equally in opportunity and prosperity can we say we have achieved it. So how do we get there?

Canada celebrates its 150th anniversary this year. As our country has evolved, we have tried to build an inclusive society through legislation designed to combat discrimination and empower all Canadians to fully participate. In 1971, Canada was the first country to adopt a multiculturalism policy. In 1988, this vision became law through the Canadian Multiculturalism Act. The Canadian Human Rights Act, the Charter of Rights and Freedoms and the Employment Equity Act are other laws which underpin inclusiveness.

Such measures have helped us build a successful society and a remarkably broad consensus as to the merits of multiculturalism. They have helped to create an environment in which, for example, thousands of Canadians volunteered to help resettle tens of thousands of Syrian refugees through the Private Sponsorship of Refugees program.

We need to go further. We must keep pace with our rapidly-changing context, which is one of the reasons we had discussion on diversity and inclusion at the University of Malmö during our visit. For generations, Sweden has inspired people around the world with its commitment to building a diverse, peaceful and welcoming society. And today, the city of Malmö is playing a central role in this effort. We have so much to learn from each other.

I’m a believer in this kind of collaboration, and this State visit to Sweden is a wonderful opportunity for like-minded countries to share ideas and best practices on inclusiveness, innovation and sustainability.

Great nations are built on great challenges.

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Bill Reid Gallery of Northwest Coast Art: Showcasing a Haida Icon

Posted February 22, 2017 by Anonymous

Nearly two decades after his death, Haida artist Bill Reid lives on in the eponymous gallery in Vancouver, home to many of his 1,500 works.

The post Bill Reid Gallery of Northwest Coast Art: Showcasing a Haida Icon appeared first on Indian Country Media Network.

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Marvelous Monarchs Move Minister McKenna

Posted February 22, 2017 by David Suzuki

Federal Environment and Climate Change Minister Catherine McKenna had her mind blown recently. Remarkably, it had nothing to do with the political gong show south of the border. McKenna was visiting the hilltop monarch butterfly reserves in rural Mexic…

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Help us choose the March/April 2017 Canadian Geographic cover!

Posted February 22, 2017 by Anonymous

Help us choose the cover of our upcoming issue of Canadian Geographic. Vote Now!
And don’t forget to sign up to always be notified by email when covers are being voted on!

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Mapping sexual harassment in Egypt

Posted February 22, 2017 by Anonymous

How Egypt’s HarassMap project is working to change attitudes about sexual harassment at home and abroad. Part of an ongoing series of stories about innovative projects in the developing world, a partnership between the International Development Research Centre and Canadian Geographic.

Visit the Charting Change website to read “Mapping sexual harassment in Egypt.”

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Blog Flog: Bacon Double Cheese Peroghies

Posted February 21, 2017 by Julie

Peroghies are a prairie staple – these little dumplings have been feeding families affordably for generations, and are the epitome of comfort food around our house. W recently pointed out that most peroghies are more potato than cheese, and nowhere near as cheesy as they could be. I can see his point – unlike other dumplings, peroghies tend to be more starchy and potato-heavy, when in fact the potato should act more as a carrier for other ingredients. I sometimes transform leftover roasted chicken, gravy and potatoes into peroghies, but it’s cheese that goes best with the bacon and onions (which, let’s face it, are the best part), and so I set to making a batch of extra cheesy peroghies using chunks of the Alexis de Portneuf cheeses currently residing in our fridge. The beauty of a peroghy is that you can add just about anything to the filling – it’s a great way to use up the last of the cheese ends. I generallyContinue reading

The post Blog Flog: Bacon Double Cheese Peroghies appeared first on Dinner With Julie.

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Pennsylvania Environmentalists Cite “Irreparable Harm” in Bid to Halt Mariner East 2 Gas Pipeline

Posted February 21, 2017 by Anonymous
A woman looks out on fracking activities in Pennsylvania

Soon after the Mariner East 2 natural gas pipeline received the green light from Pennsylvania’s Department of Environmental Protection (DEP), three environmental groups appealed to stop construction pending further review. The groups claimed the pipeline construction activities, including tree cutting and horizontal drilling, could cause “irreparable harm” to landowners and the watershed along the project route. 

Last Friday Judge Bernard Labuskes of the state’s Environmental Hearing Board denied the request of the Clean Air Council, Delaware Riverkeeper Network, and Mountain Watershed Association to issue a temporary stay preventing Philadelphia-based Sunoco Logistics from starting construction.

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Leader of Standing Rock Sioux: “This Movement Has Been Special”

Posted February 21, 2017 by Anonymous
Dave Archambault II

It’s time to do something and no longer sit back.” That was the message that David Archambault II, chairman of the Standing Rock Sioux Nation, delivered to an audience at Cornell University on February 16. His comments came just a week before the February 22 deadline set by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and echoed by North Dakota governor Doug Burgum for those at the Standing Rock encampments to evacuate.

While the overflow crowd was certainly drawn there because of the Standing Rock protests against the Dakota Access pipeline, the title of Archambault’s seminar was “Standing Rock: The Violation of Indigenous Peoples’ Rights.” While he did discuss the months-long protests, the talk covered a wide range of topics, adding essential historical context to the tribe’s modern struggle against the pipeline. 

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