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Environmental Activist Sued for Libel Over Facebook Comment About Oil and Gas Company

Posted  January 20, 2018  by  Anonymous
Pete Kolbenschlag (center) and anti-fracking activists in Colorado

On November 17, 2016, a Colorado environmental activist named Pete Kolbenschlag used Facebook to leave a comment on a local newspaper article, the kind of thing more than a billion people do every day.

However, most people don’t get sued for libel over their Facebook comments. (Although some do.)

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Saturday Stories: Bad Feminist, Zioness, and, Less-Is-More

Posted  January 20, 2018  by  Yoni Freedhoff

Margaret Atwood, in The Globe and Mail, wonders if she is a bad feminist.

Amanda Berman, in the Forward, on Zioness, her newly founded movement that’s under attack by both the far right and the far left – for feminists who (gasp) believe that Jews too have a right to self-determination.

John Mandrola, in Medscape, with his masterful essay defending less-is-more in medicine.

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#950 Big, fat asses

Posted  January 20, 2018  by  Anonymous

This ain’t no party line. Let’s not talk about how you need to accept yourself for who you are, not what you look like, or how it’s what’s inside that counts. Let’s talk about the big ol’ side of ham hanging out the back of your pants. That’s a great side of ham for five […]

The post #950 Big, fat asses appeared first on 1000 Awesome Things.

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Crime

Not Even Tax Fraud Can Keep ‘The Situation’ Away from the ‘Jersey’ Reunion

Posted  January 19, 2018  by  Anonymous

A judge gave Mike Sorrentino the OK to film ‘Jersey Shore Family Vacation’ after the reality star copped to tax evasion.

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The Best Netflix Movies to Watch When You’re Stoned

Posted  January 19, 2018  by  Anonymous

Those doinks aren’t going to smoke themselves, and you might as well watch some damn good Netflix movies while you’re at it.

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Entertainment

The ‘The Last Jedi’ Director Just Explained That Ending

Posted  January 19, 2018  by  Anonymous

Rian Johnson blasted the haters with seven tweets and a Jedi text.

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Banking

An Assistant Allegedly Stole $1.2 Million of Goldman Sachs Exec’s Wine

Posted  January 19, 2018  by  Anonymous

Including fancy French stuff that sold for $20,000 a bottle.

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Abortion

On Abortion, Trudeau Has Given Religious Groups the Controversy Many Wanted

Posted  January 19, 2018  by  Josh Visser

Conservatives are outraged by the Liberal government’s recent move.

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I Copied the Routines of Famous Writers and It Sucked

Posted  January 19, 2018  by  Anonymous

Did Balzac really drink 50 cups of coffee a day? Does Murakami actually wake up at 4 AM? For a week, I tried to live like famous writers. It went poorly.

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Crime

Film Crew Busted Trying to Sneak Fake Bomb Past Security, TSA Says

Posted  January 19, 2018  by  Anonymous

They were allegedly working on a story for CNBC.

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Entertainment

Grace Gummer of ‘Mr. Robot’ Remembers Where She Was on 9/11

Posted  January 19, 2018  by  Anonymous

The actor talks about being drawn to her craft and why a TV show is like a marathon.

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Canada

These Vancouver DJs Are Breaking Up the Boy’s Club Party Scene

Posted  January 19, 2018  by  Anonymous

The first step? They’ve started hosting parties not run by men.

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The ‘Leap of Faith’ Was Skateboarding’s Definitive Avant-Garde Moment

Posted  January 19, 2018  by  Huw Nesbitt

Jamie Thomas’s slam at Point Loma High School was a piece of art.

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Polish Police set to Ban Spontaneous Protests and Secretly Gather Personal Data at UN Climate Talks

Posted  January 19, 2018  by  Anonymous
Climate emergency sign

Participants of the next UN climate talks in Poland could be banned from taking part in spontaneous demonstrations and have their personal data collected, stored and used by Polish police without their consent if a draft piece of legislation becomes law. 

The proposed measures are going through Poland’s legislative process as the southern city of Katowice — located in the country’s coal heartland — prepares to host the annual UN climate talks this December. 

The draft bill, which sets out specific regulations for this year’s climate talks, known as COP24, was passed by the lower house of the Polish Parliament on 10 January. On Friday, the Senate passed the bill almost unanimously with only three MPs abstaining. 

The text provides a raft of initiatives to “ensure safety and public order”. This includes a ban on all spontaneous gatherings in Katowice between 26 November and 16 December, spanning the entire period of the annual UN climate talks. 

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Friday FAQs: Carrot cake inspiration, high-protein pasta, grain-free flours, and more

Posted  January 19, 2018  by  Angela (Oh She Glows)

We’re baaaaaack! Thanks for all of the Friday FAQs love last week. It was so exciting to see your enthusiasm for the return of this series. Please keep those questions (and answers) coming! And we’ve got even MORE fun news to share with you…next week will mark the return of another series—Things I’m Loving Lately! […]

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Montreal filmmaker sheds light on Kiribati's climate change dilemma

Posted  January 19, 2018  by  Anonymous

A film still from Anote's Ark by Matthieu Rytz, an official selection of the World Cinema Documentary Competition at the 2018 Sundance Film Festival.

A film still from Anote’s Ark by Matthieu Rytz, an official selection of the World Cinema Documentary Competition at the 2018 Sundance Film Festival. (Photo: Matthieu Rytz, courtesy of Sundance Institute)

For most North Americans, the predicted impacts of climate change, like rising tides and disastrous flooding, are the problems of a distant, unknowable future. For the people of Kiribati, a remote Pacific atoll that sits just two metres above sea level, they’re an immediate existential threat. 

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#951 Hearing a stranger fart in an elevator

Posted  January 19, 2018  by  Anonymous

What’s funnier than hearing a stranger fart in public? Well sure, it can happen in a bank lineup, hotel lobby, or subway car. It can happen in a restaurant, movie theater, or local bar. But the funniest of all has got to be the Elevator Fart. That’s the king of public farts, for two main […]

The post #951 Hearing a stranger fart in an elevator appeared first on 1000 Awesome Things.

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Private Investors Poured $3.9Bln into Commercial Space Companies Last Year

Posted  January 18, 2018  by  Chuck Black

          By Henry StewartAccording to the New York, NY based Space Angels, a privately held financial services group of angel investors focused exclusively on the aerospace industry, private investors poured $3.9Bln US ($4.85B…

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MDA Issues a Recruitment RFI for New Canadarm Technology

Posted  January 18, 2018  by  Chuck Black
          By Chuck Black
BC based MDA Corporation, generally considered (even by its current owners) to be “a business unit” of the larger San Franscisco, CA based Maxar Technologies, has taken the unusual step of issuing a January 15th, 2018 request for information (RFI) under the title, “Canadian Capabilities to Support a Future Canadian Robotic Manipulator System.”

No doubt the move has absolutely nothing to do with the fast growing Federal government perception, bolstered by recent articles such as December 28th, 2017 Globe and Mail post, “How Canada lost its foremost space company,” that the current MDA is no longer quite the same company as it was when it was known as “MacDonald Dettwiler and Associates” and served as the one stop private sector prime contractor for Canadian space “capacity building.”

And, no doubt, MDA’s move has nothing whatsoever to do with the growing understanding that robotics tools very similar to Canada’s current space born manipulators are at the core of several other potentially highly profitable initiatives related to satellite servicing.

The latest of these to surface, as outlined in the January 17th, 2018 2018 Space News post, “Effective Space signs first contract for satellite life extension services,” is UK based Effective Space Solutions, which recently signed its first contract with a “major regional satellite operator,” covering the launch of two of its satellite life extension vehicles to dock with existing satellites to provide station-keeping and attitude control capabilities.

According to the Space News article, the multi-year contract has a total value of more than $100Mln US ($124Mln CDN).

Join Up Now! According to the January 15th, 2018 MDA RFI, “the international space exploration community is pursuing the long-term goal of permanent human presence beyond low Earth orbit. A manned station in lunar orbit, called the Deep Space Gateway, is in the planning stages and will be a proving ground for technologies that will take us to the Moon’s surface, Mars and beyond.” To ensure “uninterrupted expansion” of the human presence into the solar system, “the time for action is now.” The wording in the RFI is broadly evocative of the recruitment videos in the 1997 Paul Verhoeven directed movie, Starship Troopers and its sequels. So are you doing your part? Graphics c/o MDA & Touchstone Pictures/ Jon Davison Productions.

As outlined in the MDA RFI:

The Canadian capabilities of interest for this RFI are applicable to the Robotics and Automation Division of MDA for commercial and civil applications. 

Responses to this RFI will help identify potential Canadian companies, capabilities and services that could be engaged in to develop a robotic manipulator system that could be used in future commercial opportunities or international collaborations. 

The Robotics and Automation website for space based robotics listed at http://mdacorporation.com/isg/robotics-automation/space-based-robotics-solutions

It also attempts to be inspiring:

Canada is considering a robotics contribution as part of this international collaborative project. This builds on Canada’s current robotic leadership position and expertise used extensively for decades on NASA’s Space Shuttle Program and the International Space Station. Canada’s robotics contributions helped construct the ISS itself and are used on an on-going basis for its maintenance and logistical operations. 

This technology is so iconic that it is depicted on our $5 bill and is a globally recognized symbol of Canadian innovation.

The RFI was issued a little over a week after the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) issued a related NPP for a “dexterous interface and tool for planetary and deep space.”

That NPP was discussed in the January 8th, 2018 post, “New “Canadarms” Will Now Compete Against Maxar/ DARPA & Orbital ATK/ NASA Satellite Servicing Technologies.”

It’s worth noting that MDA expects to win any contracts deriving from the recent CSA NPP. They still consider themselves to be the one stop private sector prime contractor for Canadian space “capacity building.”
Chuck Black.

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Chuck Black is the editor of the Commercial Space blog.

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Climate Denial Group With Trump Admin Ties Is Funding Sea Level Research in Questionable Journals

Posted  January 18, 2018  by  Graham Readfearn
Nils-Axel Mörner

A climate science denial group with links to President Trump’s administration has been funding work to sow doubt that low-lying islands in the Pacific are at risk from rising sea levels.

The two researchers being funded — one of which is a well-known climate science denier — have targeted little known “open access” journals with dubious quality controls to get their work published, DeSmog has found.

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Colourful Boho Bedroom

Posted  January 18, 2018  by  Anonymous

This Colourful Boho Bedroom is a cheery and fun space for anyone not afraid of a little colour in their lives! We’ve been in our home for over 11 years now, and over the years our kids rooms have had many different paint jobs.  When we moved in, at the time we only had the 2 kids, and our oldest was 4 and our youngest was 3, so as you can imagine, the colours have changed a lot over the years…we’ve had taupe, lavender, mint green and blue. But my favourite is definitely the current colour of my daughter’s room.  […]

The post Colourful Boho Bedroom appeared first on A Pretty Life In The Suburbs.

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Fighting for their coastline

Posted  January 18, 2018  by  Anonymous

The articulated tugboat Nathan E. Stewart aground off B.C.'s north coast in October 2016

The articulated tugboat Nathan E. Stewart grounded with fuel barge off Athlone Island on B.C.’s north coast in October 2016. Although the barge itself was empty, when the tug ran aground, it spilled more than 110,000 litres of fuel into into Heiltsuk territorial waters, devastating the local clam fishery. (Photo: Jordan Wilson/Pacific Wild)

Shortly before 4 p.m. on November 26, 2017, a U.S. barge carrying 3.5 million litres of diesel to Alaska broke free from its tugboat, the Jake Shearer, off the rocky shore of British Columbia’s Goose Island. Westerly winds were blowing at 45 knots while rain all but sandblasted the side of the barge, now anchored precariously in rough waters. The Canadian Coast Guard vessel deployed from Prince Rupert, approximately 300 kilometres away, wasn’t expected to reach the stranded barge until 7:30 p.m. at the earliest.

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How citizen scientists solved a migration mystery

Posted  January 18, 2018  by  Anonymous

Golden eagle in flight with the Rockies in the background

Every day in the spring and fall, hundreds of golden eagles stream along the front ranges of the Rocky Mountains on an aerial highway stretching from Alaska to Mexico — but until recently, scientists had no idea the birds migrated at all. (Photo: El McMullin/Can Geo Photo Club)

On a bright day in early spring, a group of dedicated citizen scientists stands in a small forest clearing off a popular hiking trail in the front range of the Rocky Mountains, about 75 kilometres west of Calgary, spotting scopes and binoculars trained on the sky. They’re scanning for golden eagles, one of the largest raptors in North America. Sure enough, a speck appears above ‘The Smile,’ a dip in the top of an unnamed mountain peak they’ve called Mt. Patrick after a young volunteer.

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Joe Bob Briggs defends Susan Cabot — by dissing “The Wasp Woman”

Posted  January 18, 2018  by  Kathy Shaidle
Joe Bob Briggs defends Susan Cabot — by dissing “The Wasp Woman”

This column by Joe Bob Briggs was humming along splendidly, until:First of all, for those of you who don’t follow these things, The Wasp Woman was a 1959 quickie for American International, dashed off by exploitation movie legend Roger Corman, that is considered horrible even by people who love Roger Corman. Focusing on this throwaway […]

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#952 When someone tells you there’s something in your teeth

Posted  January 18, 2018  by  Anonymous

Natural team players, your big ol’ teeth chomp and ship freshly ground foodpaste down the gully to the rest of your digestive system, who finish the job up in style. But unlike your stomach or large intestine, teeth actually have to look pretty doing it. They’re the frontman of the band, the captain of the […]

The post #952 When someone tells you there’s something in your teeth appeared first on 1000 Awesome Things.

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Signaling More Independence from the US, the World Bank Phases out its Support for Fossil Fuels

Posted  January 17, 2018  by  guest
Jim Yong Kim of the World Bank and Emmanual Macron of France

By Elon University

The World Bank, which provides developing countries about US$60 billion a year in financial assistance, is officially phasing out its support for the oil and gas industries.

This move brings its actions more in sync with its overarching commitment to slowing the pace of climate change and keeping the Paris agreement on track. Based on my research regarding international relations, I see this move — which World Bank President Jim Yong Kim announced in December — as significant for two reasons.

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Court Orders Nonprofit Law Firm to Pay $52,000 to Oil and Gas Company for Defending Local Fracking Waste Ban

Posted  January 17, 2018  by  Anonymous
Marcellus Shale gas well in Pennsylvania

In early January, a federal judge ordered the nonprofit law firm Community Environmental Legal Defense Fund (CELDF) to pay $52,000 to an oil and gas exploration company for defending a rural Pennsylvania township’s ban on underground injections of frack waste.

This sanction comes at the request of Pennsylvania General Energy Company (PGE) and the Pennsylvania Independent Oil & Gas Association, but is part of a growing trend to prevent municipalities across the nation from pushing back against state and federal attempts to overrule them.

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Decorating for Winter

Posted  January 17, 2018  by  Anonymous

Embrace the winter season by making your home cozy!  Here are some ideas for Decorating for Winter. I have always loved decorating the inside of my home for winter, because I love winter…the snow, the cold, cozy nights by the fire, hot chocolate, comforting dinners, not to mention all the skiing, snowshoeing and skating.  And don’t even get me started on winter clothes…I love them.  I’ll take a toque, sweaters and cozy socks any day of the year. So it just seems like a natural thing for me, to transition my Christmas decor, right into winter decor.  It feels nice to […]

The post Decorating for Winter appeared first on A Pretty Life In The Suburbs.

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Roasted Carrot and Dill Hummus

Posted  January 17, 2018  by  Angela (Oh She Glows)

I just checked the version history of my Roasted Carrot and Dill Hummus Google Doc and realized that I first tested this hummus recipe on January 10, 2015. What the heck? THREE years ago?! #hellotimewarp Better late than never, I say…although I know a few people who are likely baffled by its turtle-paced cross to […]

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Steve Sailer: “Shithole” countries, immigration and the Deep State

Posted  January 17, 2018  by  Kathy Shaidle
Steve Sailer: “Shithole” countries, immigration and the Deep State

Steve Sailer writes:America is to be “a colony of the world,” as Sen. Eugene McCarthy (D-WI) noted a quarter of a century ago. And that’s because Washington is to be the capital of the world.That explains much of the frenzy of the response to Trump’s comparison of Norway with Haiti. For Washington to rule the […]

Kathy Shaidle’s NEW book, Confessions of a Failed Slut, is available HERE.
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How changing sea ice is also changing lives in the North

Posted  January 17, 2018  by  Anonymous

Arctic, sea ice, Hudson Bay, scientist, environment, climate change

Peter Kattuk (left) and Daniel Qavvik on the lookout for belugas trapped in a polynya near Sanikiluaq, Nunavut. They are part of the Arctic Eider Society’s Community-Driven Research Network and a broader collective of hunters, scientists and organizations working to better understand how the Hudson Bay environment is changing. (Photo: Joel Heath/Arctic Eider Society)

Inuit hunters in eastern Hudson Bay are working with scientists to document their observations of a changing arctic environment. Keen observers who travel widely on the bay year-round, they first noted unusual changes in the sea ice in the 1970s, when massive hydroelectric projects on northern Quebec rivers altered the flow of fresh water into James Bay. Since the 1990s, hunters have also been witnessing the effects of a changing climate and, well aware of the importance of what they have been seeing, are recording and sharing their observations.

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Des changements dans la glace de mer changent la vie dans le Nord

Posted  January 17, 2018  by  Anonymous

Arctic, sea ice, Hudson Bay, scientist, environment, climate change

Peter Kattuk (à gauche) et Daniel Qavvik sont à la recherche de bélugas piégés dans une polynie près de Sanikiluaq, au Nunavut. Ils font partie du réseau de recherche collectif de la Société des Eiders de l’Arctique et d’une communauté plus vaste de chasseurs, de scientifiques et d’organismes travaillant afin de mieux comprendre comment l’environnement de la baie d’Hudson se transforme. (Photo : Joel Heath/Arctic Eider Society)

Des chasseurs inuits dans l’Est de la baie d’Hudson travaillent avec des scientifiques pour consigner leurs observations d’un environnement arctique en changement. Fins observateurs qui parcourent la baie tout au long de l’année, ils ont commencé à noter des changements inhabituels dans la glace de mer dans les années 1970 quand d’immenses projets hydroélectriques dans des rivières du Nord du Québec ont modifié l’écoulement de l’eau douce dans la baie James.

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Numbers Aren’t Behaviours And They Can’t Tell You How You’re Doing

Posted  January 17, 2018  by  Yoni Freedhoff

I know I’ve said this before, but it bears repeating. Whether they’re pounds on a scale, seconds on a stopwatch, or grades in school, numbers are not behaviours.

If you’re ever curious about how you’re doing, those numbers aren’t capable of telling you. Sure, the numbers to a degree reflect your efforts and choices, but they aren’t in and of themselves those things.

Given what I do day in and day out, I see this most in regard to weight management.

And I tell people, day in and day out, that if they’re curious about how they’re doing, the answer to that question isn’t how much they weigh, how much they’ve lost, how their clothing fits, how they feel physically, or how they feel mentally. Rather I tell them that if they want to know how they’re doing, they have to reflect on what they’re actually doing, and whether that’s keeping a food diary, minimizing meals out, increasing cooking, securing sleep, reducing liquid calories, whatever their strategies, if they’re cultivating consistent change, they’re doing well.

That’s true with school in terms of going to class, doing your homework, and studying.

It’s also true of sports in terms of practice, strength training, consistency, etc.

All this to say, don’t confuse numbers with behaviours, and if you’re doing all the things, you’re doing great, numbers be damned.

        
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20 travelling pets you have to follow on Instagram

Posted  January 17, 2018  by  Anonymous

Momo the border collie hides on a lifeguard stand in Deep Cove, B.C.

Momo the border collie hides on a lifeguard stand in Deep Cove, B.C. (Photo: Andrew Knapp, @andrewknapp)

Have you seen Momo?

Canadian photographer Andrew Knapp‘s Instagram feed, starring Momo, his border collie, is a sort of digital Where’s Waldo? book, inviting followers to find Momo, who might be hiding behind foliage on a west coast trail or blending into a busy cityscape. 

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How I wrote a symphony about the changing Canadian Arctic

Posted  January 17, 2018  by  Anonymous

Sea ice on Frobisher bay

Sea ice on Frobisher Bay, Nunavut. (Photo: Fiona Paton/Can Geo Photo Club)

Almost a decade ago, I visited the western Arctic region aboard the CCGS Amundsen, an icebreaker and research vessel operated by the Canadian Coast Guard.

The ship and the researchers on board were there to study climate change in the Arctic, but I was part of the “Artist on Board” program. The goal was to provide me with first-hand experience of the northern region while gaining a better understanding of climate change — from both the scientific and cultural perspectives — to inspire the composition of a large-scale symphonic work.

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#953 When the cashier opens up a new check-out lane for you at the grocery store

Posted  January 17, 2018  by  Anonymous

Though I hate to admit it, I am a slow, indecisive mess in the grocery store checkout lane. Since I am an extremely cheap person, I watch the prices scroll up on screen like a hawk, often saying things like “Oh, I thought that was on sale,” or, “Actually, I don’t really want that anymore,” […]

The post #953 When the cashier opens up a new check-out lane for you at the grocery store appeared first on 1000 Awesome Things.

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Product Review: Hoover REACT™ Upright Vacuum + A GIVEAWAY!

Posted  January 16, 2018  by  Anonymous

I am working with Hoover to test and review some of their home products, and I’m sharing my thoughts on them! But as always, all opinions and statements in this post are my own.  Today I’m sharing details on the Hoover REACT™ Upright Vacuum, and my thoughts on it!  AND I’m giving one away too!  Woot! As far as every day vacuums go, the Hoover REACT™ Upright Vacuum one is my favourite.  I have used several different every day vacuums over the years, but the suction on this one is the best.  This vacuum actually has adjustable suction settings, which I really […]

The post Product Review: Hoover REACT™ Upright Vacuum + A GIVEAWAY! appeared first on A Pretty Life In The Suburbs.

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Product Review: Hoover’s REACT™ Cordless Vacuum

Posted  January 16, 2018  by  Anonymous

I am working with Hoover to test and review some of their home products, and I’m sharing my thoughts on them! But as always, all opinions and statements in this post are my own.  Today I’m sharing details on the Hoover’s REACT™ Cordless Stick Vacuum, and my thoughts on it! I vacuum a lot in my home…with 3 kids, a fluffy dog and a cat, I have to.  Honestly, it’s something I do almost daily.  I hate sweeping (it’s my least favourite cleaning chore) so I vacuum almost exclusively.  But dragging out the vacuum to do a quick clean up can […]

The post Product Review: Hoover’s REACT™ Cordless Vacuum appeared first on A Pretty Life In The Suburbs.

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New NASA Study Solves Climate Mystery, Confirms Methane Spike Tied to Oil and Gas

Posted  January 16, 2018  by  Sharon Kelly
Global map of percent changes in acres burning

Over the past few years, natural gas has become the primary fuel that America uses to generate electricity, displacing the long-time king of fossil fuels, coal. In 2019, more than a third of America’s electrical supply will come from natural gas, with coal falling to a second-ranked 28 percent, the Energy Information Administration predicted this month, marking the growing ascendency of gas in the American power market.

But new peer-reviewed research adds to the growing evidence that the shift from coal to gas isn’t necessarily good news for the climate.

A team led by scientists at NASA‘s Jet Propulsion Laboratory confirmed that the oil and gas industry is responsible for the largest share of the world’s rising methane emissions, which are a major factor in climate change — and in the process the researchers resolved one of the mysteries that has plagued climate scientists over the past several years.

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RCGS-supported expedition discovers deepest cave in Canada

Posted  January 16, 2018  by  Anonymous

"sump" in Bisaro Anima

A “sump” — an underground channel filled with water — discovered in the Bisaro Anima cave during a previous expedition in October 2017. On January 1, 2018, caver Kathleen Graham was able to explore the sump in scuba gear and confirm Bisaro Anima as the deepest cave in Canada. (Photo courtesy Bisaro Plateau Caves Project)

Eleven regulation hockey rinks stacked end to end. That’s how deep caver Kathleen Graham descended into the Bisaro Anima Cave on January 1, 2018, establishing a new record for the deepest cave in the country.

The discovery was made during the latest expedition of the multi-year Bisaro Plateau Caves Project, which is supported by the Alberta Speleological Society and this year received funding from The Royal Canadian Geographical Society.

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