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Why Canada should recognize its citizens’ environmental rights

Posted  June 5, 2020  by  Anonymous

Students demonstrate outside the B.C. legislature in Victoria during a school strike for action on climate change in 2019. (Photo: Jack Adamson/Can Geo Photo Club)

David Boyd has built his career around a simple belief: that people, no matter wher…

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Canadian Politics

Justin Trudeau Promises to Fight Systemic Racism, Offers No Specifics About Policing

Posted  June 5, 2020  by  Anonymous

The Canadian prime minister made the comments amid a series of police brutality allegations across the country.

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New York Protesters Won’t Be Silenced by Curfew

Posted  June 5, 2020  by  Anonymous

“You know that you’re going to have their ear for a second and you know you’re going to finally be able to get a message across.”

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The Police Are Gaslighting Us

Posted  June 5, 2020  by  Jason Koebler

Reformers said body cameras and video evidence would stop police brutality. Instead, we’re being told to not believe our own eyes.

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Reddit Co-Founder Resigns, Says Company Must Replace Him With a Black Candidate

Posted  June 5, 2020  by  Anonymous

“To everyone fighting to fix our broken nation: do not stop,” Alexis Ohanian said in his resignation announcement on Friday.

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‘New York Times’ Staffers Grill Leadership Over Tom Cotton Op-Ed During All-Hands

Posted  June 5, 2020  by  Anonymous

“In publishing the Tom Cotton piece, haven’t we effectively validated depictions of Black Americans as terrorists in exercising their First Amendment rights to protest police brutality?”

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Unidentified Law Enforcement Officers Are Mysteriously Showing Up at D.C. Protests

Posted  June 5, 2020  by  Anonymous

One national guardsman was so appalled by what he saw, he told VICE News he’s going AWOL and refusing to join his unit.

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What It’s Like Becoming Homeless During a Global Pandemic

Posted  June 5, 2020  by  Anonymous

Closed libraries and drop-in centres. Water fountains shut off. Ace Lovell found himself living on the street at the worst possible time.

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Slack Removed a Blog Post Showing How Police Use its Tech

Posted  June 5, 2020  by  Joseph Cox

Slack declined to say whether it is still working with the police department.

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D.C. Mayor Demands Trump’s Military and Unidentified Riot Officers Get the Hell Off Her Streets

Posted  June 5, 2020  by  Anonymous

In a fiery letter to Trump, Washington, D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser demanded he withdraw any military presence.

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NYPD Is Taking Protesters’ Masks and Putting Them at Risk of Coronavirus in Custody

Posted  June 5, 2020  by  Anonymous

Protesters are being held as long as 50 hours with no protective gear or ability to socially distance from other protesters in custody — or cops.

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Ours to save: the species that can only be found in Canada

Posted  June 5, 2020  by  Anonymous

Spirit bears walk in forest

A kermode bear and her cub in the Great Bear Rainforest of British Columbia. (Photo: Jean-Daniel Gagne / Can Geo Photo Club)

There’s a little plant in the Northwest Territories called a hairy braya. It’s small and tufty with white flowers and kind of hairy leaves, and was first collected by one of the naturalists on Franklin’s expedition in 1826.

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Explore presents HBC *Bonus episode* – Life at Fort Simpson

Posted  June 4, 2020  by  Anonymous

Charles Camsell Tazin and Talston rivers expedition

Charles Camsell, second from right, leading a 1914 mapping expedition of the Tazin and Talston Rivers in the Northwest Territories.

What was it like to live in a remote Hudson’s Bay trading post in the 1880s in Canada’s north? In this bonus episode of the Explore series marking the 350th anniversary of the Hudson’s Bay Company, we hear a rare, first-person audio account of life at Fort Simpson in the Northwest Territories. The storyteller is Charles Camsell, founding president of The Royal Canadian Geographical Society, talking about his childhood as the son of an HBC fur trader, in an old Canadian radio recording taped in 1938.

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Tom Longboat, Indigenous self-determination and discrimination in sport

Posted  June 4, 2020  by  Anonymous

Cover of Reclaiming Tom Longboat: Indigenous Self-Determination in Canadian Sport and author Janice Forsyth

Janice Forsyth is Associate Professor of Sociology and Director of First Nations Studies at Western University in London, Ontario, and a member of the Fisher River Cree Nation. Her new book is Reclaiming Tom Longboat: Indigenous Self-Determination in Canadian Sport. (Photo courtesy University of Regina Press)

Sport is seen as the great equalizer, somehow immune from the discrimination that structures everyday life, writes Janice Forsyth in Reclaiming Tom Longboat: Indigenous Self-Determination in Canadian Sport

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How Canadian cities are adapting to COVID-19

Posted  June 4, 2020  by  Anonymous

Cyclist prepares to cross bridge

A cyclist prepares to cross the Humber Bay Arch Bridge in Toronto. Since the COVID-19 pandemic hit Canada, many cities have moved to add space for safe outdoor recreation. (Photo: Jonathan Dakin/Can Geo Photo Club)

As the public health messaging around the COVID-19 pandemic shifts from “stay home” to “stay safe,” people across Canada are looking for opportunities to get outside and access public spaces safely. 

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As Protests Rage Over George Floyd’s Death, Climate Activists Embrace Racial Justice

Posted  June 3, 2020  by  guest
Black Lives Matter Rally in Eugene, Oregon, May 31, 2020

Read time: 11 mins

By Ilana Cohen, Evelyn Nieves, Judy Fahys, Marianne Lavelle, and James Bruggers, InsideClimate News. This story originally appeared in InsideClimate News and is republished here as part of Covering Climate Now, a global journalism collaboration strengthening coverage of the climate story.

When New York Communities for Change helped lead a demonstration of 500 on Monday in Brooklyn to protest George Floyd’s killing in Minneapolis, the grassroots group’s activism spoke to a long-standing link between police violence against African Americans and environmental justice.

Elizabeth Yeampierre, executive director of UPROSE, Brooklyn’s oldest Latino community-based organization, said she considers showing up to fight police brutality and racial violence integral to her climate change activism. 

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7 ways to enjoy birds in your backyard this summer

Posted  June 3, 2020  by  Anonymous

A northern cardinal in a tree

Attracting a range of birds to your yard is easy with a few simple and inexpensive modifications. (Photo: Alexander Wywial/Can Geo Photo Club)

Millions of Canadians are staying home to avoid spreading the coronavirus and are looking for ways to stave off boredom. Why not take steps to add some colour and song to your yard, not only for your entertainment but also for the sake of helping out the birds?

As a companion to the latest edition of Pocket Birds of Canada, here are my top tips to attract birds to your property and enjoy their presence.

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POLAR scientist shares insights on losing summer of Arctic research

Posted  June 2, 2020  by  Anonymous

Arctic lichen

One example of the lichen POLAR researcher Ian Hogg monitors using probes and satellite images. (Photo: POLAR)

The COVID-19 pandemic has effectively closed off Canada’s North, where communities have shut their borders to protect already vulnerable health and language systems. The Northwest Territories, the Yukon and Nunavut have all said only essential workers and people who live in their territories will be permitted in. 

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Qamanirjuaq caribou are adapting to earlier spring, but that might not stop their decline

Posted  June 2, 2020  by  Anonymous

A barren-ground caribou bull (Bob Wick/BLM)

It’s springtime in the north. Snow is melting, rivers are breaking up, and barren-ground caribou are on the move. Each spring, the Qamanirjuaq herd walks hundreds of kilometres from the boreal forest to their calving grounds in Nunavut’s Kivalliq region, arriving with the spring green-up. The caribou feast on this first flush of tender, nutrient-rich plant growth. But as climate change heats the north, this green-up is happening earlier in the year. 

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Burlington 9th grader takes top spot in 25th Annual Can Geo Challenge

Posted  June 1, 2020  by  Anonymous

Xavier Spano sea kayaking in Les Iles-de-la-Madeleine on the 2019 Canadian Geographic Challenge finalists prize trip. (Photo: Alexandra Pope/Can Geo)

Finishing fourth in the 2019 national finals of the Canadian Geographic Challenge wasn’t enough for Xavier Spano, a Grade 9 student from Burlington, Ont. 

He wanted to win.

And on Sunday, May 31, that’s exactly what Spano did, competing in the 25th Annual Can Geo Challenge virtually from his living room. 

“I definitely studied a little bit more this year than last year,” says Spano. “Other than that, the experience was pretty similar. [The Education team] did a great job of making sure things were close to the same.”

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Journalists under attack

Posted  June 1, 2020  by  Anonymous

 

In his daily CNN newsletter, Brian Stelter gives a summary of some of the attacks made on journalists over the last few days in the George Lloyd protests across the US:

[there have been a] shocking number of cases of reporters being assaulted and arrested while covering the unrest. This wasn’t just a stray rubber bullet here or there — it seemed, to a lot of people, like targeting of journalists, by both police and in some cases by unruly protesters.

 

Bellingcat identified “at least 50 separate incidents where journalists have been attacked by law enforcement. In these examples journalists have been shot with rubber bullets, targeted with stun grenades, tear gassed, physically attacked, pepper sprayed and arrested.”

 

 >> CBS’ Michael George tweeted: “I’ve covered protests for 15 years across the US. This is the first time I’ve ever seen police actively and intentionally target the press with rubber bullets, tear gas, and arrests. Scenes reminiscent of China, Iran. We remain determined to show the country what’s happening here…”

 

 >> On Sunday morning I interviewed LA Times reporter Molly Hennessy-Fiske, who described the moment when Minneapolis police fired rubber bullets Saturday night: “We were shouting ‘press’ and I was waving my notebook at them. They just kept following us and firing at us…

 

 

As Baltimore Sun media critic David Zurawik wrote in this column, “the question that remains is why we are seeing more physical attacks on the press than we did, say, in 2015 in the uprising in the wake of the death of Freddie Gray.” Echoing what he said on CNN, Zurawik wrote, “There are a lot of reasons for the rise, but here’s the one I think making the greatest difference: almost four years of the president of the United States demonizing the press, calling reporters ‘enemies of the people’ and ‘scum,’ and encouraging rallygoers at his events to intimidate them…”

I am wondering if some police are also blaming the media for what is happening, in a “shoot the messenger” reaction — maybe they have the idea that they could beat people up any time they wanted, if it weren’t for cell phone cameras and reporters publicizing it when they do.
The actual problem, of course, is that police are beating people up. 
And journalists keep on reporting it when it happens.
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Take off, eh!

Posted  May 30, 2020  by  Anonymous

Dear Bob and Doug,

Please take off, eh!

Yours,@CAFinUS pic.twitter.com/gu48YsfBYj

— Canadian Forces in 🇺🇸 (@CAFinUS) May 30, 2020

Not sure if anyone in the States will appreciate this but it’s AWESOME the #LaunchAmerica astronauts are BOB & DOUG 👊🤘#Canada

Icons in Canada from SCTV fame !! 🇨🇦🌏🪐🌙🚀🛰@Astro_Doug #Nasa #SpaceX

Take Off !! Eh. #LiftOff #TakeOff pic.twitter.com/nyZc6i39yi

— Kevin Smith (@Global_Smith) May 28, 2020


Dear SpaceX,

Can you launch Trump into space instead?

Asking for America.

Thanks!#LaunchAmerica #SpaceLaunchLIVE #SpaceX Cape Canaveral International Space Station #LaunchDay #TrumpMeltdown #HadEnough #TwitterFactCheck #spacexlaunch #CarolynGombell Bob & Doug Challenger pic.twitter.com/3aPDEbN0TP

— Steve Rustad (@SteveRustad1) May 27, 2020


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Tropical forests can handle rising temperatures up to a certain point, study finds

Posted  May 30, 2020  by  Anonymous

Sunlight shining through a thick grove of palm trees

A new international study is the first to analyze the long-term climate sensitivity of Earth’s tropical forests. (Photo: iStock

Amid a warming climate, scientists have uncovered some good news: Earth’s tropical forests can handle the heat and can continue to store carbon up to a certain point. In other words, these carbon-hoarding tropical forests can continue to be a natural weapon in combating climate change. 

However, this comes with a warning: this can only be done if global greenhouse gas emissions are limited, and if temperatures remain under a certain threshold. 

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Saturday Stories: This Week’s COVID Selections

Posted  May 30, 2020  by  Yoni Freedhoff
Dr. Earline Austin, 63 yo NYC Physician, died on 4/3. Originally from Guyana, she lived in Fresh Meadows and was affiliated with Staten Island University Hospital. Attended Ross University for Medical School. May her memory be a blessing

Emily Chung, in the CBC, with everything you need to know to understand R-naught values.

Andy Larsen, in the Salt Lake City Tribune, with a breakdown of different locations and events and what we know of their risks in terms of spreading COVID.

Kimberly A. Prather, Chia C. Wang, and Robert T. Schooley, in Science, on how if you want life to return to some remote semblance of before’s normal, if you’re not already doing so, you need to start wearing a damn mask

Clayton Dalton, in The New Yorker, on what we lose when we become numb to mass death.

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Congress Investigates How Marathon Petroleum and Koch Network Influenced Clean Cars Rollbacks

Posted  May 29, 2020  by  Anonymous
Marathon gas station

Read time: 4 mins

On Thursday, May 28, several Democratic members of the House Committee on Oversight and Reform, along with Senator Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI), sent a letter to Marathon Petroleum seeking information on the oil company’s involvement in the Trump administration’s rollback of clean car standards. The Congressmembers are also investigating Marathon’s coordination with, and financial ties to, various free-market groups and whether those relationships are compatible with the groups’ tax-exempt status.

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Captured Courts: Senate Dems Call Out GOP For Assault On Judiciary

Posted  May 27, 2020  by  Anonymous

Read time: 2 mins

Under the cover of dark money from big donors and special interest influence, Republicans have stealthily extended their ideological agenda into what is supposed to be an independent federal judiciary, according to a new report released today from Senate Democrats.

The report, titled Captured Courts: The GOP‘s Big-Money Assault on the Constitution, Our Independent Judiciary, and the Rule of Law, examines a decades long effort by conservative interests to “fix” the federal court system to serve their political agenda. This effort has accelerated under the Trump administration and Republican Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

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California Leads Multi-State Lawsuit Against Trump Admins’ Clean Car Rollback

Posted  May 27, 2020  by  Anonymous

Read time: 3 mins

A coalition of 23 states plus the District of Columbia filed a lawsuit on Wednesday in the DC Circuit Court of Appeals, challenging the Trump Administration’s rollback of the Obama-era clean car standards. Those standards mandated stronger reductions of greenhouse gas emissions from new light-duty cars and trucks — reductions equivalent to corporate average fuel economy improvements of 5 percent annually.

But on March 31 the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA) issued a final rule requiring only minimal fuel economy increases of 1.5% annually, which the agencies’ own analyses showed would result in more pollution and premature deaths.

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Canadian Court Slams Trump Climate Advisor in Successful Libel Case

Posted  May 27, 2020  by  Anonymous

Read time: 6 mins

Climate science denier and Trump transition team advisor Dr. Tim Ball, who a Canadian court earlier derided as incompetent, ill-intended, and apparently indifferent to the truth, has been further rebuffed in the British Columbia Court of Appeal and must now stand libel for a nearly 9-year-old attack against prominent Canadian climate scientist (and outgoing BC Green Party leader) Dr. Andrew Weaver.

Ball, a retired geography professor who for almost two decades has been giving lectures and media interviews in Canada and around the world denying the science of climate change, actually “won” this case when it was decided in the British Columbia Supreme Court in 2018. In January 2011, Ball had attacked Weaver on the populist website, Canada Free Press, in an article that BC Supreme Court Justice Ronald Skolrood later described as “poorly written,” and “rife with errors and inaccuracies, which suggests a lack of attention to detail on Dr. Ball’s part, if not an indifference to the truth.”

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Say goodbye to choirs for a while

Posted  May 26, 2020  by  Anonymous

When I grew up, of course we were all in the Children’s Choir at church, and every school grade had its own choir every year to perform at the school Christmas concert. Its how I learned all my carols and Christmas songs
Of course its been years now since I was in a choir, but I do remember once, about 40 years ago, when I participated with hundreds of others in a Sing-Along Messiah at the McPherson Playhouse in Victoria —  what a great experience that was.
Now we are finding out that the recent COVID research says choirs are a prime mode of virus transmission:

It may be the single most famous outbreak in the U.S.: the Skagit County, Wash., choir practice.
Last week, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention compiled the results of its contact tracing. The choir met every Tuesday evening until March 10. At that last meeting, 61 members were present and chairs were arranged close together in six rows of 20 with many empty chairs. They practiced for 40 minutes together, for 50 minutes separated into two smaller groups, and then for 45 minutes sang together again. There was a 15-minute break between the second and third session for oranges and cookies, but many didn’t eat.  No one reported physical contact between members and most everyone left immediately after practice. Hand sanitizer was distributed. But, in the end, 53 of the 61 contracted the coronavirus. Three were hospitalized, two died.
This seems to happen repeatedly. The Amsterdam Mixed Choir gave a performance March 8; 102 out of 130 singers tested positive. Fifty members of the Berlin Cathedral Choir tested positive as well.

I’ll bet it has something to do with the act of singing – maybe the forceful expelling of breath from deep in the lungs spreads the virus droplets further. Who knows? 
Whatever the reason, I think singing together in public is likely not going to be happening anymore, not until a vaccine is available.
So I guess there are going to be no more Choir!Choir!Choir! experiences:

This may be the way choirs will sing together now:

Even the Mormon Tabernacle Choir did an online Sing-Along Messiah this Easter.
But for one last time, here’s the real thing:

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Labor Helps Obama Energy Secretary Push and Profit from ‘Net Zero’ Fossil Fuels

Posted  May 24, 2020  by  Steve Horn
President Obama and Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz

Read time: 16 mins

Progressive activists have called for a Green New Deal, a linking of the U.S. climate and labor movements to create an equitable and decarbonized economy and move away from fossil fuels to address the climate crisis. But major labor unions and President Barack Obama’s Energy Secretary have far different plans.

On the 50th anniversary of Earth Day, the AFLCIO and the Energy Futures Initiative (EFI) — a nonprofit founded and run by former Obama Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz — launched the Labor Energy Partnership. Unlike those calling for a Green New Deal, though, this alliance supports increased fracking for oil and gas, as well as other controversial technologies that critics say prop up fossil fuels. It’s also an agenda matching a number of the former Energy Secretary’s personal financial investments.

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Saturday Stories: The COVID files

Posted  May 23, 2020  by  Yoni Freedhoff
Dr.Sudheer Singh Chauhan, Internal Medicine Physician and Associate Program Director IM Residency Program at Jamaica Hospital, New York, died of COVID19 on May 19th. May his memory be a blessing
Kai Kupferschmidt, in Science, on why only some people are COVID super spreaders 
Natalie Kofler and Françoise Baylis, in Nature, on the perils, pitfalls, and disparities of “immunity passports”. 
And if you don’t follow me on Twitter or Facebook, here’s a segment I did with CTV’s The Social on the very real impact these scary times has on our physical and mental well being
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Louisiana Breaks Ground on Isle de Jean Charles Resettlement Project Amid Pandemic

Posted  May 23, 2020  by  Julie Dermansky
Chris Burnet outside of his home on the Isle de Jean Charles.

Read time: 8 mins

The COVID-19 pandemic hasn’t changed life much for Chris Burnet, a lifelong resident of Isle de Jean Charles, a quickly eroding strip of land among south Louisiana’s wetlands. Though the island, about 80 miles southwest of New Orleans, can’t be saved from the sea-level rise and coastal erosion that’s been intensified by climate change, Burnet is happy he still lives there, even though his days there are numbered. Besides loving life on the island, he believes its remoteness has kept him and the remaining island residents safe from the coronavirus. 

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Thinking about the future of Canadian food

Posted  May 23, 2020  by  Anonymous
CNN has a big story tonight about the future of the US food supply – with more questions than answers:

“We don’t know what the food-service sector will look like,” said Jaime Chamberlain, a fresh-produce importer based in Nogales, Arizona. When the pandemic largely shut down the US in mid-March, “I lost about 96 percent of my food-service contracts from one day to the next. That is an incredible hit to my business.”
Now, Chamberlain asks, “Are people going to go back to cruise lines? Will they go to a restaurant that seats 100 people? Will that restaurant be able to operate with the same amount of seating? Maybe there’ll be no more conventions for 1,000 people… I think people are going to be very reluctant.”
Burkett, speaking by phone from his Mississippi farm, shares those and other worries, and not just on his own account.“As a farmer, the dilemma I’ve got right now, is we don’t have a market. I’ve got crops going to be there to harvest, and I don’t know if we’ll have someone to sell to or not.” In a few weeks, Burkett said he will have more than 120,000 ears of sweet corn to harvest — all meant to go to restaurants that may or may not need them. “My biggest fear is the fear of how long this is going to last. I have to decide now what I’m going to plant in the fall. I’ve got to order seeds, get the ground ready,” Burkett said. He’s decided, for example, to go ahead and plant seedless watermelons, so they’ll be ready to sell this fall to the New Orleans school system — and he’ll have to hope the schools are open.

Canada is going to be having similar problems, because nobody knows what is going to happen.

COVID19 has upended the world, and given Trump’s mismanagement in America, which will bleed over into Canada too, we are going to be on our own for a long time, I think.

For us here in the west, the main issue I think is going to be food — growing it, and importing it.  The food production and distribution and processing chains are in shambles and its going to get worse.
Yes, we are planting a garden this spring after years of not bothering. And yes, we have arranged for weekly vegetable deliveries from the local market garden. And yes, I am hoarding jars so I can freeze and can vegetables and fruit for the first time in a long time. And yes, we know a guy who knows a guy who can get us a side of beef the next time they are culling their herd.
But its not going to be enough.
Especially if the meat plants keep on having to close down because the virus is running rampant through their facilities.  Wait till it gets into the fish plants, and into the fruit and vegetable processing lines.
Has anybody yet figured out the safest ways to seed, fertilize, harvest, and process our Canadian crops this summer?  Will we also have to figure out how to get our Saskatchewan grain to flour mills in Ontario, and move BC apples to the food processors in Quebec, instead of following the usual north-south shipping lanes, selling our food south while eating food imported from the US? 
And hey, funny thing, hoocouldanoode? – but maybe it would have been a good thing to keep the Canadian Wheat Board around for just such an emergency, because the Canadian government could tell them what to do and they sorta had to do it – unlike the grain companies who will happily make a pile of money shipping all our grain production to China or wherever even if Canadians need the bread.
Our remaining other marketing boards might well turn out to be useful for the next few years, too – we will need the eggs, and the milk.
Basically, in the long term, I think Canada will have to get more self-sufficient, both in terms of what we produce, and how we sell it.  It won’t be as “efficient” as the globalized food production and distribution system our food producers have spent the last 50 years developing. But at least in a Canada-focused national system, Canadians would be the first in line.
But its going to be a painful time while we sort it out.
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Exxon Sued Again for ‘Misleading’ Advertising

Posted  May 20, 2020  by  Anonymous
ExxonMobil ad

Read time: 5 mins

ExxonMobil is facing yet another lawsuit challenging the corporation’s allegedly deceptive behavior related to climate change. The latest suit, filed May 15 in the D.C. Superior Court, claims the oil major is misleading consumers with “false and deceptive” advertising about its investments in “clean” fuels and technology.

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Safety Can’t Be a ‘Pretext’ for Regulating Unsafe Oil Trains, Says Trump Admin

Posted  May 20, 2020  by  Anonymous
Lac-Megantic oil train explosion

Read time: 11 mins

The federal agency overseeing the safe transport of hazardous materials released a stunning explanation of its May 11 decision striking down a Washington state effort to regulate trains carrying volatile oil within its borders. A state cannot use “safety as a pretext for inhibiting market growth,” wrote Paul J. Roberti, the chief counsel for the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA).

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EPA Clean Air Panel Chair Dismisses His Oil Industry Ties, Slams Harvard Study on Air Pollution and COVID Risks

Posted  May 18, 2020  by  Anonymous
New York National Guard registers people at COVID-19 mobile testing center

Read time: 11 mins

The head of a federal committee tasked with advising the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on air quality science recently disparaged a new Harvard study examining the link between air pollution and coronavirus fatalities across the country. The EPA adviser’s critical remarks appear consistent with his track record of disregarding robust science on air pollution and health risks in his consulting work for industry clients such as tobacco and fossil fuel interests.

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#ObamaGreat

Posted  May 17, 2020  by  Anonymous

Here are Obama’s two addresses tonight to the HBCU and high school 2020 graduating classes. 

#ObamaGreat and #ObamaWasBetterAtEverything are now trending around the world. 

Congratulations to the HBCU Class of 2020! Michelle and I are so proud of you. As you set out to change the world, we’ll be the wind at your back. Can’t wait to see what you achieve. https://t.co/PCsjkJJTXi

— Barack Obama (@BarackObama) May 16, 2020

Congrats to the high school Class of 2020, as well as to the teachers, coaches, and most of all, parents and family who’ve guided you along the way. Thanks for letting me be part of your big day! pic.twitter.com/RjYvHs2BhC

— Barack Obama (@BarackObama) May 17, 2020

And here is what people think about the guy America has got instead:

— Eleven Films (@Eleven_Films) May 16, 2020

The contrast is enough to break your heart.

I’m all for a Space Force if we use it to launch every fucking member of this criminal administration straight the fuck into the sun

— Jeff Tiedrich (@itsJeffTiedrich) May 15, 2020


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Saturday Stories: This week in COVID19

Posted  May 16, 2020  by  Yoni Freedhoff
Mary Agyeiwaa Agyapong, UK RN, 28 years old, died from COVID April 12th. May her memory be a blessing.  

Peter Piot, one of the scientists who discovered Ebola, in Science, with his thoughts on COVID, both as an expert and as a survivor.

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Former Inslee Staffers Urge Biden and House Dems to Embrace $1.2 Trillion Green Stimulus as Part of COVID-19 Recovery

Posted  May 15, 2020  by  guest
Jay Inslee

Read time: 4 mins

By Julia Conley, Common DreamsOriginally published on Common Dreams under CC BYSA 3.0 US.

Staffers who helped develop Washington Gov. Jay Inslee’s widely-praised climate policy during his 2020 presidential run are now calling on congressional Democrats to adopt the bold initiatives included in the plan to make a shift to a renewable energy economy within coronavirus relief legislation.

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Under Rising Pressure on Climate, JPMorgan Rejects Shareholder Calls to Disclose Full Carbon Footprint

Posted  May 14, 2020  by  Anonymous
JPMorgan Chase Tower

Read time: 7 mins

America’s largest bank is shunning calls from shareholders to disclose its full emissions, despite warnings from its own economists that “catastrophic” climate change could end up threatening human life “as we know it.”

JPMorgan Chase, which a coalition of U.S. environmental groups recently claimed is the world’s largest financer of fossil fuels, has instructed its shareholders to vote down a proposal for the bank to report the emissions of its lending activities at its upcoming annual general meeting (AGM) on May 19.

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