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The U.S. Isn’t Counting Prison Suicides Even Though the Law Requires It

Posted  August 23, 2019  by  Anonymous

Jeffrey Epstein’s suicide shined a light on a problem in the prison system: no one is keeping track of suicide deaths on a national basis.

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The Shocking Cruelty of Indefinite Detention

Posted  August 23, 2019  by  Anonymous

Formerly detained migrants describe what would happen if the Flores settlement were dismantled.

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Google Agrees to Meet with YouTubers Union Right Before Deadline

Posted  August 23, 2019  by  Anonymous

After 28 days, YouTube has agreed to meet with the YouTubers Union to discuss ‘the future of work’ but refuses to negotiate demands.

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Obama’s New Documentary Is Great. It Also Reveals Why He’s Out of Touch

Posted  August 23, 2019  by  Anonymous

‘American Factory’ on Netflix is a solid film, but Obama’s message of finding common ground in an uneven labor dispute ignores working people’s realities.

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Canada

What I Learned at Canada’s Most Deliriously Patriotic Light Show

Posted  August 23, 2019  by  Anonymous

How can a light show be racist, you ask? The “Northern Lights” on Parliament Hill delivers in both official languages.

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Scientists Saw an ‘Energetic Eruption’ Under Jupiter’s Clouds for the First Time

Posted  August 23, 2019  by  Becky Ferreira

The observations provided a “missing link” in theories about storms that rage in Jupiter’s atmosphere.

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Researchers Created AI That Hides Your Emotions From Other AI

Posted  August 23, 2019  by  Anonymous

As smart speaker makers such as Amazon improve emotion-detecting AI, researchers are coming up with ways to protect our privacy.

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‘Old Town Road’ Is Responsible for a Remix Renaissance

Posted  August 23, 2019  by  Anonymous

This week alone, artists like Lizzo, Saweetie, and Pop Smoke have released major remixes that extend the shelf life of their songs.

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Children

What Happens to Polyamorous Relationships When One Partner Has Kids

Posted  August 23, 2019  by  Anonymous

When a member of a polycule gets pregnant, everyone faces new choices about how to adjust their relationships.

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Los Angeles Might Start Punishing Homeless People Based on Where They Sleep

Posted  August 23, 2019  by  Anonymous

Like schools, parks, or otherwise “crowded public sidewalk areas.”

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Fires are burning in the Amazon rainforest. Here’s what you need to know

Posted  August 23, 2019  by  Anonymous

Satellite image showing smoke from Amazon fires blowing over Brazil on August 20, 2019

A satellite image taken on August 20, 2019 shows smoke from Amazonian forest fires blowing over the states of Amazonas, Mato Grosso, and Rondônia in Brazil. (Photo: NASA Worldview, Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS)

The world’s attention suddenly turned to Brazil this week as international media reported an unusually high number of fires burning in the Amazon rainforest. As of Thursday, Brazil’s National Institute for Space Research, which monitors fire activity across the entire Amazon, had recorded 76,720 fires this year in Brazil alone, an 85 per cent increase over the 2018 fire season. 

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#432 When the crosswalk sign changes from stop to walk right as you get there

Posted  August 23, 2019  by  Anonymous

It’s like the universe knew you were coming. AWESOME! Photo from: here — Check out my Youtube channel —

The post #432 When the crosswalk sign changes from stop to walk right as you get there appeared first on 1000 Awesome Things.

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‘Game-Changer’: Sanders Unveils Green New Deal Plan Detailing 10-Year Mobilization to Avert Climate Catastrophe, Create 20 Million Jobs

Posted  August 22, 2019  by  guest
Bernie Sanders

Read time: 5 mins

By Jake Johnson, Common Dreams. Originally published on Common Dreams under CC BYSA 3.0 US.

Calling the global climate crisis both the greatest threat facing the United States and the greatest opportunity for transformative change, Sen. Bernie Sanders on Thursday unveiled a comprehensive Green New Deal proposal that would transition the U.S. economy to 100 percent renewable energy and create 20 million well-paying union jobs over a decade.

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How an Application for Propane Fracking Attempts to Circumvent New York’s Fracking Ban

Posted  August 22, 2019  by  Anonymous
Anti-fracking protesters in New York

Read time: 6 mins

Four years after New York announced the state was banning hydraulic fracturing (fracking), Tioga Energy Partners, LLC has filed an application with the state to frack for natural gas, but there’s a catch. The company is proposing to swap propane into the industry standard mix that usually calls for water.

Environmental advocates consider this application to use liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), and specifically a propane gel, an attempt to circumvent New York’s 2015 ban on fracking for fossil fuels.

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Microplastics are turning up in Arctic ice

Posted  August 22, 2019  by  Anonymous

Icebergs in the Canadian High Arctic

Photo: Suzanne Southon/Can Geo Photo Club

A team of researchers from the University of Rhode Island has found unusually high concentrations of microplastics in thick Canadian Arctic ice, raising concerns that plastic pollution has spread to even the most remote regions on Earth.  

During an 18-day expedition through the Northwest Passage last month, the team sampled ice cores more than two metres thick in Lancaster Sound, a body of water between Devon and Baffin Islands. Initially, they were looking for plankton, but what they found was alarming.

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Help us choose the cover for The Ultimate Canadian Geography Quiz

Posted  August 22, 2019  by  Anonymous

Help us choose the cover of our upcoming special issue, The Ultimate Canadian Geography Quiz. Vote Now!
And don’t forget to sign up to always be notified by email when covers are being voted on!

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‘It’s been raining! In the High Arctic!’

Posted  August 22, 2019  by  Anonymous

Scientists have already been conducting research in Nunavut’s Cambridge Bay region around the CHARS facility, often with the help of local Inuit such as Candice Sudlovenick (above), a conservation officer. (Photo: Neil Ever Osborne/Canadian Geographic).

During late spring in Cambridge Bay, in the very early morning, there’s an hour or so of muted light when the town’s 1,800 inhabitants are asleep, the dogs are curled in their plywood houses, and there’s not a snowmobile on the land, nor an aircraft or bird in the sky. The horizon to the east is a slash of rippled blood, and if you happen to be awake and outdoors and in a place with a view across the tundra, you can, in the silence, with a little imagination, see a thousand years into the past.

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#433 When you’re next

Posted  August 22, 2019  by  Anonymous

Suddenly the shuffling crowd parts and you’re at the front of the line. Suddenly your boss quits and nobody else can do her job. Suddenly you’re on deck during a late inning tie game. Suddenly your sister’s finished opening her Christmas present. Suddenly you’re next. AWESOME! Photo from: here — Follow me on Twitter —

The post #433 When you’re next appeared first on 1000 Awesome Things.

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Four things to know about Thaidene Nëné, Canada’s newest national park reserve

Posted  August 21, 2019  by  Anonymous

Dramatic cliffs in Thaidene Nene National Park Reserve

The landscape of Thaidene Nëné National Park Reserve is characterized by deep lakes, stark, glacier-carved cliffs, boreal forest and tundra. (Photo: Pat Kane/Canadian Geographic)

It took nearly 50 years of planning and consultation, but Canada’s newest national park reserve has officially been established in the Northwest Territories.

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#434 Finding your pizza soulmate

Posted  August 21, 2019  by  Anonymous

Toppings are tough. The other day I was watching movies with my friend Shiv when our stomachs started rumbling and we decided to dial for dinner. I got up and grabbed a stack of crinkly takeout menus from the junk drawer and we flipped through all the fancy ones before settling on pizza. Of course, […]

The post #434 Finding your pizza soulmate appeared first on 1000 Awesome Things.

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How to explore like a girl

Posted  August 20, 2019  by  Anonymous

Jill Heinerth as a young girl and now

Left: A 12-year-old Jill Heinerth in her Girl Guide uniform explores near her cottage on Ontario’s Big East Lake. Right: Heinerth in Florida’s Devil’s Eye Spring cave, where she often dives in the winter. (Photos: Bob Rabjohn; Jill Heinerth)

On Friday, Feb. 5, 1971, the PA system at Munden Park Public School in Mississauga, Ont., reverberated with a special announcement. The school principal requested staff and students assemble in the library — to watch television!

As school had started that day, two men were donning spacesuits for a walk on the moon that lasted more than five hours. At about 4 a.m., Apollo 14 had landed in the moon’s Fra Mauro crater, the intended landing site of the aborted Apollo 13 mission of 1970.

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Combating gender-based violence in Colombia

Posted  August 20, 2019  by  Anonymous

Infographic and Illustration: Fundación Ideas para la Paz (FIP)/Christian Benito Rebollo

A perception map of Tumaco, Colombia. The map uses wildlife symbols to show points where women can be attacked (wasps) or face danger from criminal gangs that control or fight over particular territory (snakes). (Infographic and Illustration: Fundación Ideas para la Paz (FIP)/Christian Benito Rebollo)

Colombia’s era of armed conflict with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC, officially ended in 2016, but violence of another kind remains a problem in the South American country. Discover how researchers are using on-the-ground consultations and specialized maps to help put an end to the violence Colombian women and LGBTI people face. Part of an ongoing series of stories about innovative projects in the developing world, a partnership between the International Development Research Centre and Canadian Geographic. 

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#435 Food drooling

Posted  August 20, 2019  by  Anonymous

Check out that sexy plastic tray. Welcome to the crowded food court, workplace lunch room, or high school cafeteria. Thin napkins and ketchup smears cover tables as wailing babies and french fry fumes fill the air. It’s time for lunch so your stomach’s grumbling and all you can think about is how hungry you are. […]

The post #435 Food drooling appeared first on 1000 Awesome Things.

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Documents Show Koch Network’s ‘Structure of Social Change’ in Action

Posted  August 19, 2019  by  Ben Jervey
Koch Student Commons, on the ground floor of Kansas University's business school.

Read time: 10 mins

Back in 1996, the president of the Charles Koch Foundation laid out a blueprint for the Koch network’s goals of social transformation — a three-tiered integrated strategy to roll back government regulations, promote free market principles, and, in doing so, to protect the industries that turned the Koch brothers into billionaires. 

More than three decades later, that blueprint is still being followed in a broad-scale effort to serve the Kochs’ free-market libertarian ideology, to prop up the oil and gas industries that pad their fortunes, and to forestall any political action on climate change that they believe would threaten their bottom line.

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Did North Dakota Regulators Hide an Oil and Gas Industry Spill Larger Than Exxon Valdez?

Posted  August 19, 2019  by  Anonymous
Exxon Valdez

Read time: 15 mins

In July 2015 workers at the Garden Creek I Gas Processing Plant, in Watford City, North Dakota, noticed a leak in a pipeline and reported a spill to the North Dakota Department of Health that remains officially listed as 10 gallons, the size of two bottled water delivery jugs.

But a whistle-blower has revealed to DeSmog the incident is actually on par with the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill in Alaska, which released roughly 11 million gallons of thick crude.

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9 Great Suggestions For Improving The Quality Of Dietary Research (And 1 That According To @JamesHeathers Is “Deeply Silly”)

Posted  August 19, 2019  by  Yoni Freedhoff

Last week saw the publication of an op-ed authored by Drs. David Ludwig, Cara Ebbeling, and Steven Heymsfield entitled, “Improving the Quality of Dietary Research“. In it they discuss the many limitations of dietary research and chart a way forward that includes the following 9 great suggestions,

  1. Recognize that the design features of phase 3 drug studies are not always feasible or appropriate in nutrition research, and clarify the minimum standards necessary for diet studies to be considered successful.
  2. Distinguish among study design categories, including mechanistic, pilot (exploratory), efficacy (explanatory), effectiveness (pragmatic), and translational (with implications for public health and policy). Each of these study types is important for generating knowledge about diet and chronic disease, and some overlap may invariably exist; however, the findings from small-scale, short-term, or low-intensity trials should not be conflated with definitive hypothesis testing.
  3. Define diets more precisely when feasible (eg, with quantitative nutrient targets and other parameters, rather than qualitative descriptors such as Mediterranean) to allow for rigorous and reproducible comparisons.
  4. Improve the methods for addressing common design challenges, such as how to promote adherence to dietary prescriptions (ie, with feeding studies and more intensive behavioral and environmental intervention), and reduce dropout or loss to follow-up.
  5. Develop sensitive and specific biomeasures of adherence (eg, metabolomics), and use available methods when feasible (eg, doubly labeled water method for total energy expenditure).
  6. Create and adequately fund local (or regional) cores to enhance research infrastructure.
  7. Standardize practices to mitigate the risk of bias related to conflicts of interest in nutrition research, including independent oversight of data management and analysis, as has been done for drug trials.
  8. Make databases publicly available at time of study publication to facilitate reanalyses and scholarly dialogue.
  9. Establish best practices for media relations to help reduce hyperbole surrounding publication of small, preliminary, or inconclusive research with limited generalizability.”

But there was one recommendation that seems at odds with the rest,

Acknowledge that changes to, or discrepancies in, clinical registries of diet trials are commonplace, and update final analysis plans before unmasking random study group assignments and initiating data analysis.

For those who aren’t aware, clinical registries are where researchers document in advance the pre-specified methods and outcomes being studied by way of an observational experiment. The purpose of pre-registration is to reduce the risk of bias, selective reporting, and overt p-hacking that can (and has) occurred in dietary research.

Now to be clear, I’m a clinician, not a researcher, and I’m not sure how commonplace changes to or discrepancies in clinical registries of diet trials are, but I’m also not sure that’s an argument in their favour even if they are. I do know that recently two of the authors claiming registry changes are commonplace were found to have modified one of their pre-specified statistical analysis plans which if it had been adhered to, would have rendered their results non-significant.

But commonplace or not, is it good science?

To answer that question I turned to James Heathers, a researcher and self-described “data thug” whose area of interest is methodology (and who you should definitely follow on Twitter), who described the notion of accepting that changes and discrepancies to clinical registries were commonplace was, “deeply silly“.

He went on to elaborate as to why,

First of all – the whole definition of a theory is something which sets your expectations. the idea that ‘reality is messy’ does not interfere with the idea that you have hypothesis driven expectations which are derived from theories.

Second: there is nothing to prevent you saying “WE DID NOT FIND WHAT WE EXPECTED TO FIND” and then *following it* with your insightful exploratory analysis. In fact, that would almost be a better exposition of the facts by definition as you are presenting your expectations as expectations, and your after-the-fact speculations likewise.

Third: if you have a power analysis which determines there is a correct amount of observations necessary to reliably observe an effect, having the freedom to go ‘never mind that then’ is not a good thing by definition.

Fourth: The fact that changes were made is never ever included in the manuscript. i.e. they are proposing being able to make changes to the protocol in the registry *without* having to say so. it’s a ‘new plan’ rather than a ‘changed plan’.

Fifth: If you can still do the original analysis then no-one will ever believe that you didn’t change the plan after looking at the data. you have to protect yourself, and the best way to do that is to follow your own damned plans and be realistic from the get.

Lastly, Heathers is unimpressed with the argument that registry changes are A-OK because they’re commonplace, and he discussed ancient Aztecan punishments for those citing it.

All this to say, there’s plenty of room to improve the quality of dietary research. Here’s hoping the bulk of these suggestions are taken to heart, but please don’t hold your breath.

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Yes, It’s Due to Human Activity: New Research ‘Should Finally Stop Climate Change Deniers’

Posted  August 19, 2019  by  guest
Scientists testing ice

Read time: 4 mins

By Tim Radford for Climate News Network

European and US scientists have cleared up a point that has been nagging away at climate science for decades: not only is the planet warming faster than at any time in the last 2,000 years, but this unique climate change really does have neither a historic precedent nor a natural cause.

Other historic changes — the so-called Medieval Warm Period and then the “Little Ice Age” that marked the 17th to the 19th centuries — were not global. The only period in which the world’s climate has changed, everywhere and at the same time, is right now.

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#436 When the subway doors stop right in front of where you’re standing

Posted  August 19, 2019  by  Anonymous

Come on in. When you’re first in the car it’s time for some smoooooth sitting. Yes, you’ve got your pick of the seats before anyone else gets in there. Do you want the chipped orange plastic one in the corner with the Coke spilled on it or the stained yellow one in front smeared with […]

The post #436 When the subway doors stop right in front of where you’re standing appeared first on 1000 Awesome Things.

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Saturday Stories: Morning People, In Sickness, And Mom Bods

Posted  August 17, 2019  by  Yoni Freedhoff

Olga Khazan, in The Atlantic, discusses people like me – cursed to wake up every day before 5:30am.

Mark Lukach, in The Pacific Standard, discusses love in the face of severe mental illness.

Alice Sueffert, in ScaryMommy, discusses finally showing her mom bod some love.

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Christopher Leonard’s New Book Puts an Ever-Expanding ‘Kochland’ on the Map

Posted  August 16, 2019  by  Sharon Kelly
Kochland book cover over Pine Bend refinery

Read time: 8 mins

Christopher Leonard’s new book, Kochland: The Secret History of Koch Industries and Corporate Power in America, begins, appropriately enough, with an FBI agent, who is investigating criminal activity by the company, standing in a field with a pair of binoculars, trying to catch a glimpse of the daily operations of a company that prizes secrecy.

Koch Industries was under investigation for theft of oil from the Osage and other Indigenous nations. Walking into the company’s office building involved passing through security checkpoints, Leonard explains, so numerous that one investigator later told Leonard that it “reminded him of traveling to CIA headquarters in Langley, Virginia.”

Through exhaustive reporting and extraordinary interviews with past and current company executives, including some turned whistleblower, Kochland offers readers a view far larger than can be seen through binocular lenses, walking readers past those layers of security checkpoints and into the inner workings of an institution that has for decades tirelessly built itself into practically all American lives, while largely evading accountability or transparency.

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Big Oil Can’t Fight the ‘Irresistible’ Rise of Electric Vehicles — Report

Posted  August 16, 2019  by  guest
EV charing

Read time: 4 mins

By Paul Brown for the Climate News Network

The days of oil as a fuel for cars, whether petrol or diesel, are numbered — because the economies offered by wind and solar energy and other cheap renewables, combined with electric vehicles, are irresistible, a French bank says.

BNP Paribas Asset Management calculates that oil majors like Exxon, BP and Shell will have to produce petrol from oil at $10 a barrel (the current price is $58) to compete with electricity on price, while for diesel, it says, oil can cost no more than $19 a barrel.

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#437 Seeing a plane in the sky from the airplane window

Posted  August 16, 2019  by  Anonymous

Hello out there. Staring out your airplane window and spotting another plane cruising calmly through the clouds feels a bit mysterious and magical. The open skies are suddenly traffic lanes from The Jetsons and you get to take a brain step back at how far we’ve come… While our ancestors were painting ocean caves, sleeping […]

The post #437 Seeing a plane in the sky from the airplane window appeared first on 1000 Awesome Things.

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Can Geo Talks presents: Jill Heinerth

Posted  August 15, 2019  by  Anonymous

She’s dived inside Antarctic icebergs and flooded mine passages, explored shipwrecks and subaquatic caverns. And this year, renowned explorer Jill Heinerth has also been busy with a different kind of adventure: writing a memoir.

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#438 Almost Names

Posted  August 15, 2019  by  Anonymous

It’s what your parents were going to call you but didn’t. Flipping through baby books, chatting at bedtime, you better believe your folks had alternate identities in mind before you borned out. They thought about nicknames, shortforms, and tributes. They thought about spelling, rhyming, and meanings. Basically, they thought and hoped and wished all kinds […]

The post #438 Almost Names appeared first on 1000 Awesome Things.

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Fracking and Shale Drilling Caused Spike in Climate-Warming Methane Pollution, Says New Study

Posted  August 14, 2019  by  Sharon Kelly
Flaring in Permian Basin Shale with sunflowers

Read time: 8 mins

Climate-changing pollution reached unprecedented levels in 2018. That’s both judged against the last 60 years of modern measurements and against 800,000 years of data culled from ice cores, according to the U.S. government’s State of the Climate report, which was published this week with the American Meteorological Society.

That pollution creates a greenhouse effect that is over 42 percent stronger than it was in 1990, the report added.

And while carbon dioxide hit a new level last year, it isn’t the only climate-changing gas that’s on the rise globally. Pollution of the powerful but short-lived greenhouse gas methane also climbed in 2018, showing an increase “higher than the average growth rate over the past decade,” the report adds.

A new Cornell University study published today in the scientific journal Biogeosciences helps to explain what sparked the surge in those methane concentrations, both here in the U.S. and around the world.

One big culprit: shale drilling and fracking.

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#439 Checking someone out and not getting busted

Posted  August 14, 2019  by  Anonymous

Sunglasses are a form of comfortable and protective eyewear that help prevent strong sunlight and UV rays from damaging your eyes. They are a popular fashion accessory, too. Try them at a restaurant, in a car, or on the beach. AWESOME!     — Follow me on Instagram —

The post #439 Checking someone out and not getting busted appeared first on 1000 Awesome Things.

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Adani Beware: Coal Is on the Road to Becoming Completely Uninsurable

Posted  August 13, 2019  by  guest
Coal mine

Read time: 6 mins

By John Quiggin, The University of Queensland

The announcement by Suncorp that it will no longer insure new thermal coal projects, along with a similar announcement by QBE Insurance a few months earlier, brings Australia into line with Europe where most major insurers have broken with coal.

U.S. firms have been a little slower to move, but Chubb announced a divestment policy in July, and Liberty has confirmed it will not insure Australia’s Adani project.

Other big firms such as America’s AIG are coming under increasing pressure.

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Children

Kellogg’s Partners With Random House To Use Free Books To Sell Ultra-Processed Sugary Junk Food To Children

Posted  August 13, 2019  by  Yoni Freedhoff

To be clear, neither Random House, nor Kellogg’s, should be fairly expected to do the right thing when it comes to health.

Kellogg’s job is to see food. Random House’s job is to sell books. Nothing more, nothing less.

So it’s hard to get mad with either company for their “Feeding Reading” initiative which provides parents with permission or excuse to buy their children such health foods as:

  • Frosted Flakes
  • Pop-Tarts
  • Eggos
  • Nutrigrain Bars
  • Froot Loops
  • Rice Krispie Treats
  • Apple Jacks
  • Frosted Mini-Wheats (note, unfrosted mini-wheats are not eligible)
  • Corn Pops
  • Raisin Bran
  • Krave
  • Keebler cookies
  • Cheez-its
  • Austin crackers
  • Pringles

Truly, not a single choice parents or children should be encouraged to make. All ultra-processed, sugary, junk (and some crackers and potato chips).

Again, no reason to expect either Random House or Kellogg’s to be doing the right thing by kids, but in my opinion, their clear partnership in doing the wrong thing here certainly doesn’t reflect well on either of them.

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The curious, extraordinary life of Anne Innis Dagg

Posted  August 13, 2019  by  Anonymous

Anne Innis Dagg feeding a giraffe at Chicago’s Brookfield Zoo in 2015

Anne Innis Dagg visiting Chicago’s Brookfield Zoo in 2015. The zoo was where she first saw giraffes as a child, sparking a lifelong love of the species and an extraordinary career. (Photo: Elaisa Vargas)

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#440 Somehow correctly guessing an old password you haven’t used in a long time

Posted  August 13, 2019  by  Anonymous

I knew you would never leave me, PIN. AWESOME! Photo from: here — Follow me on Twitter —

The post #440 Somehow correctly guessing an old password you haven’t used in a long time appeared first on 1000 Awesome Things.

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