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Trudeau On How His Brother’s Pot Charge Disappeared

Posted  April 25, 2017  by  Manisha Krishnan

Malik Scott was charged with cannabis possession and fears it will result in a criminal record. He asked Trudeau what would he say to someone in his position, given that if his bill goes forward, cannabis will be legalized in a year.

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Activism

When You Find Out the World Is Against You

Posted  April 25, 2017  by  Anonymous

In her new book, bestselling author Kelly Oxford recalls how Trump’s infamous “Grab them by the pussy” tape inspired her viral hashtag.

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Animals

‘Henry Gets into Shape,’ Today’s Comic by Benji Nate

Posted  April 25, 2017  by  Anonymous

Henry, a human-sized cat person, tries to work out with his owner, Olive, after noticing he’s put on a few extra pounds.

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Activism

More Muslims Are Running for Office in a Vile Political Climate

Posted  April 25, 2017  by  Anonymous

Candidates like Abdul El-Sayed, who’s running for governor of Michigan and has drawn comparisons to Barack Obama, are unafraid of any Trump effect.

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General

Dude, Wes Anderson’s New Movie Is Coming Out on 4/20

Posted  April 25, 2017  by  Anonymous

A slick new poster for ‘Isle of Dogs’ reveals exactly what type of movie the auteur’s second animated film will be.

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New York Times Defends Hiring of Climate Science Denier Bret Stephens, Claiming ‘Intellectual Honesty’

Posted  April 25, 2017  by  Graham Readfearn
New York Times office by night

The New York Times has been defending the paper’s hiring of a climate science denier, fighting off its critics with what it claims is a standard fashioned from hardened “intellectual honesty.”

The controversial hire in question is that of Bret Stephens, formerly of the Wall Street Journal, who has joined the NYT as a columnist and deputy editorial page editor.

While at the WSJ, Stephens consistently undermined and disparaged climate change, one time describing it as an “imaginary enemy” and another comparing it to religion with a “doomsaying prophecy and faith in things unseen.”

Stephens’ new boss, editorial page editor James Bennett, told the paper’s public editor Liz Spayd: “The crux of the question is whether his work belongs inside our boundaries for intelligent debate, and I have no doubt that it does. I have no doubt he crosses our bar for intellectual honesty and fairness.”

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Weeks Before Becoming Trump Top Energy Adviser, Mike Catanzaro Lobbied for Keystone XL

Posted  April 25, 2017  by  Steve Horn
Pipeline sections for Keystone XL pipeline in 2009

Just weeks before being hired as President Donald Trump‘s top White House energy adviser, Mike Catanzaro was paid by TransCanada to advocate for the Keystone XL pipeline.

Lobbying for his old employer, CGCN Group, disclosure forms reviewed by DeSmog reveal that a team of lobbyists including Catanzaro advocated for “Policy issues and executive branch approval of the Keystone pipeline.” TransCanada paid Catanzaro and the CGCN team $90,000 for their work during the first quarter of 2017. The Trump administration recently gave the Canadian energy company the green light to build the long-contested cross-border pipeline, which will carry tar sands from Alberta, Canada, to Cushing, Oklahoma.

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Canada

10 Years Later, ‘Chocolate Rain’ Is More Woke Than Ever

Posted  April 25, 2017  by  Anonymous

It’s time to finally acknowledge the song’s deeper meaning

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Canada

Meet the Harm Reduction Worker Who Called Out Trudeau on the Opioid Crisis

Posted  April 25, 2017  by  Anonymous

“It’s a national disaster, you are not doing enough. The bodies keep mounting.”

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Chaffetz Says Michael Flynn Probably Took Money from Russia and There Will Be ‘Repercussions’

Posted  April 25, 2017  by  Anonymous

The conclusion comes after reviews of classified memos and Flynn’s financial disclosures.

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Forest Service’s ‘Independent’ Report on Atlantic Coast Pipeline Written by Pipeline Company Contractor

Posted  April 25, 2017  by  Anonymous
Monongahela National Forest sign

The U.S. Forest Service recently published an assessment of the proposed Atlantic Coast pipeline, calling the report “independent.”

DeSmog has learned, however, that in reality the assessment was performed and written by none other than a contractor working for the pipeline company. The contractor was hired by the Forest Service to conduct the assessment.

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Canada

Justin Trudeau Criticized for his Response to a Black Man Facing Pot Possession Charges

Posted  April 25, 2017  by  Manisha Krishnan

“It just makes me feel like the legal system is more corrupt,” Malik Scott says.

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Obama’s Getting $400K for His First Private Speaking Engagement

Posted  April 25, 2017  by  Anonymous

The former president is scheduled to speak at a healthcare conference for a Wall Street financial firm in September.

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UN Marks Tenth Anniversary of Indigenous Rights Declaration

Posted  April 25, 2017  by  Anonymous

Reflecting on 10 years of UNDRIP at the 16th session of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Peoples, from April 24 through May 5, 2017.

The post UN Marks Tenth Anniversary of Indigenous Rights Declaration appeared first on Indian Country Media Network.

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Investing in Our Youth Through Education – Native NERDS Org Needs Indian Country’s Help

Posted  April 25, 2017  by  Anonymous

An annual Native Youth Gathering, summer school and after school programs, the Native NERDS program created by Dahkota Kicking Bear Brown is a great cause

The post Investing in Our Youth Through Education – Native NERDS Org Needs Indian Country’s Help appeared first on Indian Country Media Network.

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Aquinnah Wampanoag Tribe Celebrates Gaming Ruling

Posted  April 25, 2017  by  Anonymous

The Aquinnah Wampanoag Tribe scored a victory when the 1st U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals reversed a lower court ruling on gaming.

The post Aquinnah Wampanoag Tribe Celebrates Gaming Ruling appeared first on Indian Country Media Network.

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Native Films Supported and Native Turnout at the 2017 Tribeca Film Festival

Posted  April 25, 2017  by  Anonymous

Awake, A Dream From Standing Rock and VICELAND’s RISE were two Native-themed films that premiered at New York’s 2017 Tribeca Film Festival

The post Native Films Supported and Native Turnout at the 2017 Tribeca Film Festival appeared first on Indian Country Media Network.

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Meet the aurora chaser who named an atmospheric phenomenon "Steve"

Posted  April 25, 2017  by  Anonymous

Steve, atmospheric phenomenon

Chris Ratzlaff first saw the atmospheric phenomenon he would jokingly call “Steve” while out hunting for the aurora borealis near his hometown of Airdrie, Alta., in August of 2014. The photographer and weather enthusiast, who has been chasing auroras since 2010, initially thought the narrow strand of purplish light arcing dimly across the sky was an airplane contrail catching the glow from some light source on the ground.

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Homemade Chewy Amaretti Cookies

Posted  April 25, 2017  by  Anonymous

♥ can you improve on “perfection” ♥ maybe there’s a certain cookie you crave even long for every single day.. something you would indulge in { if you could } more than once a day ♥ ♥ well.. i…

{ This is a content exerpt only.. Please click on the Blog Title to continue reading this post, share your love, browse Just a Smidgen and more.. }

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How to Not Screw Up the Segmental Cat Camel

Posted  April 25, 2017  by  deansomerset

The cat camel stretch is a drill that I often see being taught or explained, but unfortunately it looks more like a modified twerk than something designed to provide movement control through the spine. I mean, if you’re rocking this sucker so fast that you’re more closely resembling a seizure than controlled motion, you’re likely…… Read More

The post How to Not Screw Up the Segmental Cat Camel appeared first on DeanSomerset.com.

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Standing Rock Episode, Part 1: Latest Video in Indigenous with Stacey Thunder Series

Posted  April 25, 2017  by  Anonymous

The latest video in the series: Indigenous with Stacey Thunder video series highlights the spiritual power and unity at Standing Rock and #NoDAPL

The post Standing Rock Episode, Part 1: Latest Video in Indigenous with Stacey Thunder Series appeared first on Indian Country Media Network.

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‘Destroy the Ice Cream Man’: Native Youth Testifies on Diabetes Crisis

Posted  April 25, 2017  by  Anonymous

While levels of obesity and Type II diabetes are generally leveling off in the adult American Indian population, the numbers continue to be staggering.

The post ‘Destroy the Ice Cream Man’: Native Youth Testifies on Diabetes Crisis appeared first on Indian Country Media Network.

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Our Mother Language and the Survival of Native Language As a Whole

Posted  April 25, 2017  by  Anonymous

The future of tribal members relies on what we teach the next generation starting with Native language, because we’re more than just descendants.

The post Our Mother Language and the Survival of Native Language As a Whole appeared first on Indian Country Media Network.

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Remembering ‘Salmon Scam’: The River People’s Battle Continues

Posted  April 25, 2017  by  Richard Walker

Remembering Yakama Nation fisher Daniel Sohappy, imprisoned in the 1980s on trumped-up charges for catching salmon as his ancestors had.

The post Remembering ‘Salmon Scam’: The River People’s Battle Continues appeared first on Indian Country Media Network.

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Genetic Continuity Study Backs Up Oral Histories

Posted  April 25, 2017  by  Anonymous

A new study shows genetic links between skeletons found in Alaska and British Columbia and Indigenous Peoples living there today, backing up oral histories.

The post Genetic Continuity Study Backs Up Oral Histories appeared first on Indian Country Media Network.

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Paul Naschy’s “Werewolf vs the Vampire Woman” (1971)

Posted  April 25, 2017  by  Kathy Shaidle
Paul Naschy’s “Werewolf vs the Vampire Woman” (1971)

More from my siteDark Corners looks at ‘Face of the Screaming Werewolf’ (1964)Thoughtful commentary on ‘An American Werewolf in London’ and the original ‘The Wicker Man’‘How To Make a Monster’ (1958) — one of my favorite movies — airs on AMCGavin McInnes: Playing Gay in F-L-A

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My NEW Taki’s column, about the history of “fashionable” diseases

Posted  April 25, 2017  by  Kathy Shaidle

During this same era, “gout…functioned as more than a malady; it was also part of a social code embedding class, rank, affiliation, standing and political position.” The distinguished Scottish physician James Makittrick Adair complained in Essays on Fashionable Diseases (1790) drily that: “Upwards of thirty years ago, a treatise on nervous diseases was published…. Before […]

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The high cost of cheap clothes

Posted  April 25, 2017  by  Anonymous

Collapse of a garment factory in Dhaka, Bangladesh

The collapse of the Rana Plaza garment factory in 2013 was the worst industrial disaster in Bangladesh’s history, killing more than 1,000 people. A Dhaka-based think tank is working to ensure a similar incident never happens again. Part of an ongoing series of stories about innovative projects in the developing world, a partnership between the International Development Research Centre and Canadian Geographic.

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More on Canada’s "Next Top Astronauts," Canada’s "Failure To Scale" & Is Our Space Agency "Muzzling" its Contractors?

Posted  April 24, 2017  by  Chuck Black
          By Henry Stewart

There’s nothing new under the sun and pretty much everything happening today is understandable when placed in the context of what’s happened in the past. That’s why this blog is currently running two historical series, by acknowledged Canadian experts, on “A History of the Canadian Space Program – Policies & Lessons Learned Coping with Modest Budgets,” and “150 Years of Canadian Aerospace History.”

Given that. and for the week of April 24th, 2017, here are a few of the stories we’re currently tracking for the Commercial Space blog:

At least they’re mostly not “striking a pose” or wearing heels. We’re down to the “final seventeen,” an important enough milestone to splurge on brown polo’s and organize a group shot with the innovation minister (on the left, with his back facing the camera). A final decision on the two Canadian astronaut openings is expected to be announced sometime this summer. To view the complete April 24th, 2017 press conference, please click on the graphic above. Screenshot c/o CSA.
  • As the hot PR winds continue to blow, Federal minister of innovation Navdeep Bains has announced the “final seventeen” candidates completing for the two open slots in the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) astronaut corps. 

As outlined in the April 24th, 2017 Global News post, “Final candidates unveiled as Canada searches for 2 new astronauts,” the finalists now include “twelve men and five women, roughly reflecting the ratio of men to women who applied to the program.” A complete listing of the remaining seventeen candidates are available online on the CSA “Who are the astronaut candidates?,” webpage.

The competition, being run by the CSA, began last year with over 3,700 applications received. 

That field was initially reduced (with much fanfare) to seventy-two, and then reduced again earlier this year to thirty-two candidates. The expectation is that the final two successful applicants will be chosen later on in the year, again with much fanfare.

As part of the presentation surrounding the latest unveiling, Minister Bains noted the $379Mln CDN the Federal government allocated to International Space Station (ISS) activities in 2016 (which covers costs through 2024 and was originally announced by the previous government), the $80Mln CDN the Federal government allocated to new space projects in 2017 and the ongoing activities related to the space working group, which began meeting just two weeks ago to assess potential, future space projects.

As outlined in the 2016-17 Report on Plans and Priorities, published yearly by the CSA, the current CSA base budget (the amount of money required to keep CSA employees on staff and CSA buildings open and functioning even without any activities, exploration or science being undertaken) is $300Mln CDN annually.

The cover page of the April 2017 Impact Brief on “Canadian Tech Tortoises; Is a lack of spending on marketing and sales delaying fundraising?” Graphic c/o Impact Centre.

  • Are Canadian start-ups unable to scale into large corporations? A recent study from The Impact Centre at the University of Toronto seems to think so and might have even suggested a reason why.

As outlined in an April 24th, 2017 e-mail from Charles Plant, a senior fellow with the Impact Centre, “anecdotal evidence suggests that many Canadian technology companies wait until their products are launched before spending funds on crucial functions such as marketing and sales and that this practice is delaying growth and success in fundraising.”

The key component missing from Canadian start-ups seems to be that “Canadian firms have significantly fewer employees in marketing and sales functions than US firms do,” at least according to Plant.

Plant and his colleagues also found that, “even among the best funded firms, Canadian technology firms have 25% fewer marketing and sales employees than US based Unicorns do. This lack of emphasis on marketing and sales may be delaying and impeding rapid growth and our companies’ ability to get funding to scale to world-class status.”

The complete April 2017 report, under the title “Canadian Tech Tortoises; Is a lack of spending on marketing and sales delaying fundraising?” is available online at http://www.impactcentre.ca/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/170421-Tech-Tortoises.pdf.  

A bipartisan reminder, courtesy of the April 30th, 2012 Ottawa Citizen Post, “Agency’s Long-term plan years overdue,” that the Canadian government space program has been drifting for decades, even as our private space sector activities took off. But at least we’ve been allowed to publicly assess our flaws, right? Well… Maybe not. Graphic c/o PressReader.

  • Has the CSA “muzzled” its contractors? The latest CSA request for proposal (RFP), posted on the Federal government Buy and Sell procurement website, suggests that it has.

As outlined on the April 24th, Buy and Sell posting, “Radio-Frequency (RF) Communication Contribution Concept Study (9F050-16-0974),” the CSA has issued an RFP for a single contract, “for an all-inclusive budget not to exceed $400,000.00 CDN (excluding any applicable taxes)” covering “potential solution for an RF communications contribution.” 

    The attachment to the solicitation document (CSA-DSTRF-SOW-0001) under the title, “Post-ISS Human Spaceflight Contributions – Deep Space Telecommunications (DST) RF Concept Study,” goes into a little more detail on the nature of the work the CSA is contracting. 

    As outlined in the document, the RFP is to help define concepts for “collaborative Beyond Low Earth Orbit (BLEO) Missions” as defined in the NASA global exploration road map, which is being developed by space agencies participating in the International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG). 

    Not that there’s anything wrong with that. It’s good that our space agency is co-operating with others to generate useful plans for activities after the ISS winds down.

    The main page of the ISECG website, a forum set up by 14 space agencies (including Canada’s CSA) to “advance the Global Exploration Strategy through coordination of their mutual efforts in space exploration.” Screenshot c/o ISECG.

    But there sure seems to be some onerous restrictions on how CSA subcontractors can go about discussing their contributions to this program. 

    As outlined on page twenty three of the main solicitation document under the title Communications Activity Coordination Process:

    The contractor must coordinate with the CSA’s Directorate of Communications and Public Affairs all Communication Activities pertaining to the present contract. To this end, the contractor must:

    • As soon as the Contractor intends to organize a Communication Activity, send a Notice to the CSA’s Directorate of Communications and Public Affairs. The Communications Notice must include a complete description of the proposed Communication Activity. The Notice must be in writing in accordance with the clause Notice included in the general conditions applicable to the contract. The Communications Notice must include a copy or example of the proposed Communication Activity. 
    • The contractor must provide to the CSA any and all additional document in any appropriate format, example or information that the CSA deems necessary, at its entire discretion to correctly and efficiently coordinate the proposed Communication Activity. The Contractor agrees to only proceed with the proposed Communication Activity after receiving a written confirmation of coordination of the Communication Activity from the CSA’s Directorate of Communications and Public Affairs.
    • The Contractor must receive beforehand the authorization, approval and written confirmation from the CSA’s Directorate of Communications and Public Affairs before organizing, proceeding or hosting a communication activity. 

    These clauses makes it essentially impossible for CSA subcontractors to talk to the public without either the formal approval of the CSA Directorate of Communications, unless they are willing to run the risk of becoming non-compliant with their CSA contract.

    This is similar to the actions of the previous Stephen Harper conservative government as outlined in the November 6th, 2015 Huffington Post report, “Liberals Unmuzzle Canadian Scientists, Promise They Can Now ‘Speak Freely.‘”

    It’s also an activity the current Justin Trudeau Liberal government had insisted was done away with when they took office in 2015. 

    Newly minted innovation minister Navdeep Bains at a press conference on Parliament Hill on November 6th, 2015 where he fulfilled a Liberal party campaign promise to allow government scientists and experts to comment on their work to the media and the public. Hopefully, he’ll also do the same for our space agency. Photo c/o Adrian Wyld/CP.

    Oddly enough, similar clauses are also included in other recent CSA documents posted on Buy and Sell, such as the April 19th, 2017 “Development of enabling space technologies (9F063-160953/A)” notice of proposed procurement (NPP) and the April 5th, 2017 “Dextre Deployable Vision System (DDVS) – Phases B/C and D (9F052-160487/A)” NPP. 

    This blog has requested clarification on those contract clauses and the reasons for their inclusion in CSA documents and will update this post as new information becomes available. 

    For more, check out our upcoming stories in the Commercial Space blog.

    _______________________________________________________________________
    Henry Stewart is the pseudonym of a Toronto based aerospace writer.

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    US Air Quality Improving but White House Looking to Reverse That Progress

    Posted  April 24, 2017  by  Farron Cousins
    Smokestacks emitting pollution

    The American Lung Association (ALA) released its “State of the Air” report last week, and the organization found that air quality in U.S. cities has improved in the time period from 2012–2014. The ALA report specifically cites the increased air quality protections and emission reduction programs that first began popping up in the U.S. to improve air quality in the 1970s.

    While overall air quality improved in the major cities studied in the report, the ALA did note that short periods of increased air particulate contamination existed in many areas. Furthermore, the ALA added that at least 166 million Americans are currently living in areas where the level of air contaminants exceeds safe limits.

    The timing of this report is very important, as the group is hoping to use this information to convince the Trump administration not to repeal or otherwise weaken air quality standards enacted by the Obama administration.

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    Lemon and Maple Salmon Sheet Pan Dinner

    Posted  April 24, 2017  by  Anonymous

    Make this Lemon and Maple Salmon Sheet Pan Dinner in less than one hour!  Healthy and delicious! – – – – – – I’m telling you, these sheet pan dinners are the biggest dinner time saver since the crockpot. There’s really no dinner made easier than putting everything onto one pan and cooking it all at once.  And there is something about it that is so visually appealing to everyone at the table, even for the pickiest of eaters.  It’s all there laid out in it’s deliciousness…fresh and smelling ah-mazing. I’ve been trying several different sheet pan dinner combinations and can’t wait to share them all with you.  We love this Chicken Sheet Pan dinner, I made a Mexican Chicken version that is coming soon, and I also made this salmon variation that I am sharing with you today. Sheet pan dinners really don’t require a lot of thought or planning.  Often times I will just throw whatever I have around in the fridge/pantry/freezer onto a sheet.  For this particular Lemon and Maple Salmon Sheet Pan Dinner I used salmon I already had in the freezer and smothered it with a maple BBQ sauce I picked up on a recent trip […]

    The post Lemon and Maple Salmon Sheet Pan Dinner appeared first on A Pretty Life In The Suburbs.

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    Part 6: 150 Years of Canadian Aerospace History

    Posted  April 24, 2017  by  Chuck Black

    Bomarc Missiles, The “Prevailing Wisdom” of Unaware Politicians, Unemployed Avro Employees, NASA, Canadair, CAI & the Origins of Spar Aerospace

    Bomarc. Photo c/o Canadian Aviation and Space Museum.

             By Robert Godwin

    Canada’s aerospace raison d’être has always derived from its immense size, its location in the far north as a vast, barely-tracked wilderness of incalculable resources and the logical requirements relating to defence, communications, utilization and exploration which naturally follow from its size and location.

    The Avro Arrow was to be replaced by a surface to air missile, built by Boeing in the United States, named the Bomarc.  The Bomarc was a liquid fueled interceptor with a static launching site and a limited range. It was also designed to be equipped with a nuclear warhead.

    At the moment that Canada committed to this weapon for its defence, the prevailing wisdom was already changing in the United States and the Soviet Union, against the usefulness of static-site liquid fueled rockets. They were considered easy targets and they took too long to prepare for launch.

    In the Soviet Union even rocket genius Sergei Korolev was struggling to convince Nikita Khrushchev that the rocket which had launched Sputnik was useful as a weapon. In England, Geoffrey Pardoe, one of the principal designers of Britain’s Blue Streak was fighting a similar fight with British Prime Minister Harold Macmillan.

    However, in the United States dozens of contractors were still lining up to build missiles. The new technology of rockets was outpacing the social awareness of the politicians in charge of commissioning them.

    At the exact time that 13,000 Avro employees went in search of employment, the United States government was looking for aerospace engineers to come and help its newly formed National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to put a man into space. Within weeks of the Avro lay-offs dozens of engineers headed south of the border and took up positions at NASA, McDonnell, Douglas, Boeing, Bell, Grumman and elsewhere. Many went back to England where they were employed by de Havilland and Hawker Siddeley.

    The main beneficiary of this “brain drain” was NASA where people like James Chamberlin, John Hodge, William Carpentier, Len Packham, Owen Maynard and two dozen others took up positions in the fledgling American space program, often as department heads. Over the next ten years they would play an important role in putting humans on the moon.

    Just four days after the cancellation of the Arrow, the Black Brant was fired for the first time on a test stand in Valcartier. The cancellation of Arrow represented something of a windfall for Canadair. The management at the Montreal based company now knew that it had another chance to bid on the construction of Canada’s next generation of fighter aircraft. Canadair had flourished all through the 1950s building more than 1500 variants of the North American Aviation Sabre fighter. At about the same time de Havilland had been building the Grumman S2-F Tracker anti-submarine aircraft.

    Sabres of 421 Squadron Royal Canadian Air Force at RCAF Station Grostenquin, France in the 1950’s. The Canadair Sabre was a jet fighter aircraft built by Canadair in Montreal, PQ under licence from North American Aviation. According to the wikipedia entry, “a variant of the North American F-86 Sabre, it was produced until 1958 and used primarily by the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) until replaced with the Canadair CF-104 in 1962. Several other air forces also operated the aircraft.” Photo c/o Canada’s Air Forces, 1914–1999

    The CAI barely acknowledged the huge loss of jobs at Avro and began to encourage more cooperation with the United States, both for fighters and for space. In early March 1959, in response to the notion that Canada should join in on a Commonwealth space program, Herbert Ribner of the CAI expressed his opinion that Canada would be better to ally itself with the USA.

    Less than a month after that, in April 1959, the Diefenbaker government announced its intentions to design a satellite to be launched by the United States. At first it was expected that the satellite would be built in the USA, with the stated intention that it would be used to probe the upper atmosphere from above. If it could be built and launched successfully the satellite was expected to reveal hitherto unforeseen insights into the nature of the ionosphere and perhaps resolve some of the problems with long range communications that had been dogging governments for generations. Two weeks later the British government announced its intention to follow Canada’s lead and launch its own space program with the help of the United States.

    Canada’s first real satellite was proposed by John Herbert Chapman of the NRC in Ottawa. Chapman knew that to be able to study the ionosphere from above, his satellite would need to operate in a frequency range that would require extremely long antennae. Chapman knew Phil Lapp, who was still at de Havilland’s missile division in Downsview Ontario, so he contacted him and suggested that he visit the office of George Klein who worked near to Chapman at NRC. Klein had devised a clever device which could be used as an antenna but could also be packed into a very tight space. This so-called STEM antenna could be deployed without any overly complicated mechanisms. It was perfect for space projects.

    The Canadian built STEM antenna used in the Alouette-1 satellite. The compact, flat, but flexible metallic bar unrolls and bends inward to become a rigid cylinder able to be used as a satellite antenna.  Photo c/o Canadian Science and Technology Museum (CSTM) collection #1992.0357.00.

    Klein was another graduate of the University of Toronto. He was born in Hamilton in 1904 and by the time he was 39 he had already earned an MBE from King George. Klein had an uncanny knack for invention and in July of 1951 he had been returning from a trip to England aboard the Cunard ship Franconia when he had what was perhaps his greatest idea.

    Evidently Klein liked to roll his own cigarettes and it was while standing on the deck of the Franconia he rolled up a cigarette paper and had a revelation. It had occurred to him that he could make a similar roll-up device out of metal which might be a useful remedy to a problem that he had been given to solve.

    What was needed was an antenna which could be dropped out of an aircraft over rugged terrain, or even water, and be used to send back data. Working with another NRC genius named Harry Stevinson, Klein concocted a workable device which would ultimately lead to the black box concept seen in most of today’s modern aircraft.

    Lapp studied Klein’s invention and took it back to de Havilland where the engineers went to work to make a version that would be long enough for Chapman’s satellite. This innocuous device would become so successful it would go on to create an aerospace industry behemoth – SPAR Aerospace. 

    Robert Godwin.
    _____________________________________________________________

    Robert Godwin is the owner and founder of Apogee Space Books, the Space Curator at the Canadian Air & Space Museum and an American Astronautical Society History Committee Member.

    He has written or edited over 100 books including the award winning series “The NASA Mission Reports” and appeared on dozens of radio and television programs in Canada, the USA and England as an expert not only on space exploration but also on music.  

    His books have been discussed on CNN, the CBC, the BBC and CBS 60 Minutes. He produced the first ever virtual reality panoramas of the Apollo lunar surface photography and the first multi-camera angle movie of the Apollo 11 moonwalk. His latest book was written with the late Frederick I Ordway III and is called “2001 The Heritage and Legacy of the Space Odyssey” about the history of spaceflight at the movies.

    Last Week, “The International Geophysical Year, the Avro Arrow & Jetliner, Lapp, Stehling, Bull & Blue Streak” in part five of “150 Years of Canadian Aerospace History.

    Next Week, “Canada’s First Satellite, the F104 “Widowmaker,” the Hawker P1127 (which eventually became the Harrier) and More Politics” as part seven of “150 Years of Canadian Aerospace History” continues.

    On sale now, at Apogee Books.

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    Canadian Space Agency announces final 17 astronaut candidates

    Posted  April 24, 2017  by  Anonymous

    Seventeen Canadians have taken a major step closer to achieving their dream of becoming an astronaut. The Canadian Space Agency announced on April 24 the finalists of their latest recruitment challenge, two of whom will eventually become Canada’s newest astronauts.

    More than 3,700 people applied to the recruitment when it launched in June 2016, but a gamut of medical, mental, physical and psychological tests narrowed the field to the 17 remaining hopefuls who will now start the final stage of the challenge.

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    Q&A with a team captain heading to the Shell Eco-marathon Americas

    Posted  April 24, 2017  by  Anonymous

    Marc-André Caron, a student at the University of Ottawa

    The final countdown is on for the 2017 Shell Eco-marathon Americas, taking place in Detroit, Michigan from April 27-30. Marc-André Caron, a third year mechanical engineering student at the University of Ottawa, is the team captain of Supermileage uOttawa, who are competing in the gasoline prototype category with their vehicle JAWS. We talked to Caron to get a behind-the-scenes look at how teams prepare for the competition. 

    How do you approach the competition?

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    New multimedia project reveals the beauty of the unpolluted night sky

    Posted  April 24, 2017  by  Anonymous

    A starlit scene in Banff National Park, part of the Skyglow project

    If you’ve ever tried to stargaze in an urban centre, it’s likely all you saw were airplanes and satellites; in cities, lights on the ground create a haze that masks the stars from view. That haze is actually a form of pollution, one that most Canadians encounter every day without necessarily realizing it.

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    Jim Goad: Did you know one of Kori Ali Muhammad’s victims was a “punch Nazis!” white virtue-signaller?

    Posted  April 24, 2017  by  Kathy Shaidle

    Jim Goad writes: Armed with a gun and roaming through Fresno looking for white men to slay, Muhammad reportedly chanced upon a Pacific Gas and Electric Co. truck. Seeing that the driver was Hispanic, he instead chose to shoot and kill the white passenger, Zack Randalls. Here’s what I know about Zack Randalls: He was […]

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    Joe Bob Briggs: “Then Again, Maybe I’m a Black Man”

    Posted  April 24, 2017  by  Kathy Shaidle
    Joe Bob Briggs: “Then Again, Maybe I’m a Black Man”

    Joe Bob Briggs returns: In the course of my talk at the Chattanooga Film Festival last week, I noted that almost every alleged white person in East Tennessee claims Cherokee blood. Far from being proud of their direct Indian-killing ancestors like Andrew Jackson, they instead claim lineage from the “Trail of Tears” side of the […]

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    Will Candy With 30% Less Sugar Just Make Matters Worse?

    Posted  April 24, 2017  by  Yoni Freedhoff
    Once reformulated this candy will “only” be 36.5% free sugar by weight 

    A few weeks ago I blogged about the new lower in sugar Kit Kat bar that contains 4 fewer calories than the old bar (with 0.7g less sugar). The front of its package doesn’t shout out about lower sugars though, instead it hypes “extra milk and cocoa“.

    It was the first example I’d seen of the inevitable future of ultra-processed treats that are being designed and launched under the banner of sugar as our global, singular, dietary boogeyman.

    While there’s little doubt we over consume sugar, and that sugar is one of the primary drivers of hyper-palatability and obesity, if the marketplace sees an influx of “now with 30% less sugar” ultra-processed foods, I’m not sure they won’t make matters worse.

    And that’s precisely the sort of thing we’re going to see as evidenced by this new line of Nestlé candy which according to this news story, will be sold alongside the original candy “with a 30% less sugar banner on the packaging

    Sounds an awful lot like the early 1990s when we saw the launch of “Fat-Free” Snackwell cookies (and more of course).

    Will the “Now With 30% Less Sugar” banner lead people to buy candy more often? To eat candy more frequently? To eat more candy at each sitting? To grudgingly give in to their naggy kids and pack it in their lunches because it’s less bad? Or will it lead to an overall reduction in free sugars and calories consumed?

    For the majority of folks, my money’s on all of the former, and none of the latter.

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    March for Science Organizer: ‘Titans’ Like Einstein, Galileo, Carson Engaged With Politics

    Posted  April 23, 2017  by  Julie Dermansky
    Scientists and supporters carry a banner leading the DC March for Science

    On Earth Day, tens of thousands turned out for the March for Science in Washington, D.C., despite the rain, celebrating ideas, facts, and empirical data while chastising climate science deniers.

    Celebrity science educator Bill Nye, honorary co-chair of the March for Science, told the crowd, “We are marching today to remind people everywhere, our lawmakers especially, of the significance of science for our health and our prosperity.” The crowd roared their approval when he said they “could change the world.” 

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    Part 6: A History of the Canadian Space Program – Policies & Lessons Learned Coping with Modest Budgets

    Posted  April 23, 2017  by  Chuck Black

    The 1980’s, A “National Space Agency,” Canadarm’s Rollout, The Second Three Year Space Plan & Canada’s First Astronauts


    Scan c/o Globe and Mail.
    By Graham Gibbs & W. M. (“Mac“) Evans

    This paper, first presented at the 65th International Astronautical Congress, which was held in Toronto, Ontario from September 29th – October 3rd, 2014, is a brief history of the Canadian space program, written by two of the major participants.

    In late 1979 and early 1980 the Ministry of State for Science and Technology (MOSST) and the Air Industries Association of Canada (AIAC) independently analyzed the existing approach to space in Canada and both concluded that there were weaknesses that limited the scope and benefits of the program. 

    Both also concluded that correction of these deficiencies was essential to the more efficient and effective use of the government’s space resources. The AIAC argued strongly for the formation of a national space agency. 
    In response to these concerns, the Prime Minister in July 1980 assigned to MOSST “the leadership role with respect to space policy and development” and transferred responsibility for the Interdepartmental Committee on Space (ICS) from the Minister of Communications to the Minister of MOSST. Thus, in 1980, MOSST became the lead agency in the areas of space research and development, policy development, and coordination of space activities among government departments and agencies.
    In April 1981, John Roberts, the Minister of State for Science and Technology announced a three-year space plan for Canada (1981/82 to 1983/84). This was the first time that a consolidated space plan had been considered by the government. The plan was aimed at building upon Canada’s strengths to use space for communications and science, while at the same time developing a major new thrust in the area of remote sensing. 
    As outlined in the April 9th, 1981 United Press International (UPI) post, “Science Minister John Roberts Announced an Increase in Federal Funding for Space Research,” Canada’s first three year space plan was part of a proposal to centralize Federal space activities into a single agency, while also providing a funding increase for space and other areas of scientific research in order to assist with moving the plan forward. Roberts proposed a $64Mln CDN increase (to $260Mln CDN) for space research, along with a further increase of $200Mln CDN (to $1.5Bln) in all other areas of Federally funded scientific research and development. Screenshot c/o UPI archives.  
    More than 60% of the new funding of $64Mln CDN was dedicated to remote sensing projects including a new basic R&D program to give Canada the technological and industrial competence to develop and establish a remote sensing satellite carrying a synthetic aperture radar (which eventually became known as RADARSAT). In making his announcement, Mr. Roberts indicated that it was the government’s intention to update the three year space plan every year.

    During this period, Canada also delivered the first of what would become multiple Canadarm’s to NASA. A post (unfortunately, now deleted) on the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) website described very eloquently the moment that Canadarm sprung into the consciousness of people everywhere in the world:

    The morning of Friday, November 13, 1981, yielded a great emotional moment of pride for all Canadians. Shortly past 10:00 a.m. EST on that date, a majestic sight was broadcast on every television screen around the world. 

    Through the aft window of shuttle Columbia, a video camera operated by the two STS-2 astronauts, Commander Joe Engle and Pilot Richard Truly had begun to transmit the first images of the deployed Canadarm. 

    The arm, bent in an inverted V shape position, shined against the jet-black background of space, under a milky blue portion of the earth. The Canada wordmark with the red maple leaf flag prominently displayed on the upper arm boom of the Canadarm were a proud and clear statement about Canada’s official contribution to the Space Shuttle program. Canadarm quickly became the icon around the world for Canada’s high technology capabilities. 

    The importance of the Canadarm to the Shuttle Program is indicated by the fact that this first flight of the arm took place on just the second Shuttle flight.

    In December 1981, Mr. Roberts announced the government’s second three-year space plan (1982/83 to 1984/85) that in essence added one more year to the previously announced plan. This new plan increased the government’s expenditures on space for these three years by 38% and included Canadian participation in the L-SAT Communications Satellite Program of ESA (justified on the grounds that it would support the prime contractor policy) and project definition studies for a new communications satellite program (MSAT) to provide communications services to mobile users anywhere in Canada.

    In 1982, on the occasion of the 20th anniversary of the flight of Alouette I, NASA extended an invitation for Canada to fly its own astronauts on the Shuttle. This offer was clearly seen as a “thank you“ to Canada for providing the Canadarm.

    The government recognized immediately the significance of this offer and National Research Council (NRC), as the only organization in the government with human space flight experience, was assigned responsibility to establish the Canadian Astronaut Program Office.

    The NASA offer was for two payload specialist flights, but NRC had ambitions to ensure Canada would be ready for additional flight opportunities, including flights to the space station that was on the drawing boards at NASA. In July, 1983 NRC placed an ad in Canadian newspapers seeking candidates.

    A 1983 help wanted ad. Image c/o Ron Riesenbach’s Blog.

    Canada’s first six astronauts were announced in December, after a country-wide competition involving more than 4400 applicants. Ten months later, in October 1984 Marc Garneau became the first Canadian to fly in space. A little over a year later, the Shuttle that had taken Marc into orbit exploded on launch killing all seven astronauts on board.

    It is interesting to note that Canada entered the human space flight arena primarily to support the Canadian Space industry. There was no Canadian user need for either the Canadarm or the Astronauts, but the space industry needed a major program to follow-on to CTS.

    But public reaction to the Canadarm and the astronaut programs was so positive and so strong that these one shot efforts created the policy imperative to make human space flight a permanent part of the Canadian Space Program and would lead eventually to the creation of the Canadian Space Agency.

    ________________________________________________________________________
    Graham Gibbs & Mac Evans. Photos c/o MyCanada & CSA.
    Graham Gibbs represented the Canadian space program for twenty-two years, the final seven as Canada’s first counselor for (US) space affairs based at the Canadian Embassy in Washington, DC. 

    He is the author of “Five Ages of Canada – A HISTORY from Our First Peoples to Confederation.”

    William McDonald “Mac” Evans served as the president of the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) from November 1991 to November 2001, where he led the development of the Canadian astronaut and RADARSAT programs, negotiated Canada’s role in the International Space Station (ISS) and contributed to various international agreements that serve as the foundation of Canada’s current international space partnerships.

    He currently serves on the board of directors of Vancouver, BC based UrtheCast.

    Last Week: Winding up the 1970’s, The Canada Centre for Remote Sensing, Spar Aerospace, MacDonald Dettwiler, a Seminal 1974 “Canadian Policy for Space” & the Canadarm,” in part five of “A History of the Canadian Space Program: Policies & Lessons Learned Coping with Modest Budgets.”

    Next Week: “More on the 1980’s” as part seven of “A History of the Canadian Space Program: Policies & Lessons Learned Coping with Modest Budgets,” continues.

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