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How Exxon Lobbyists Led Push to Deepen US Ports and Increase Natural Gas Exports

Posted  May 16, 2017  by  Steve Horn
LNG port

The U.S. has signed a major deal with China to ship liquefied natural gas (LNG) to Asia, adding further momentum to America’s hydraulic fracturing (“fracking”) boom.

The deal, which includes the export of other commodities from the U.S. to China, was signed about a month after President Donald Trump met with Chinese President Xi Jinping. Much of the LNG in this deal will move across a recently expanded Panama Canal, offering a fast-track route to Asia for larger vessels, an expansion for which the oil and gas industry lobbied.

A DeSmog investigation has revealed that expanding the Panama Canal was part of a two-part process, which included an oil and gas industry push to deepen ports in the Gulf of Mexico as well. Emails obtained under the Texas Public Records Act show that lobbyists for ExxonMobil were leading this effort.

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Ministerial Statement – Vision Health Month – May 2016

Posted  May 16, 2017  by  Canada News Centre - National News

Vision Health Month – May 2016

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Lateral Hip Shift During a Squat: What’s Going On and What to Do About It

Posted  May 16, 2017  by  deansomerset

It’s a common thing to see when someone is doing a squat workout: The walk out strong, they drop deep into the hole, and then on the way out, they wind up sticking their hips to the side in a motion path that would closely resemble a question mark. This question mark  hip shift brings…… Read More

The post Lateral Hip Shift During a Squat: What’s Going On and What to Do About It appeared first on DeanSomerset.com.

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My NEW Taki’s column on that new “study” of only children

Posted  May 16, 2017  by  Kathy Shaidle
My NEW Taki’s column on that new “study” of only children

Now, some who read past the first paragraph or two will object that the study’s authors are “with Southwest University in Chongqing, China,” whatever that is; and the Chinese had that whole demographically disastrous “one child” policy, so their motives here might be murky; plus a Chinese “MRI” is probably just a cardboard box with […]

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How Australian Climate Science Denier Senator Malcolm Roberts Magically Turned Warmer Into Colder

Posted  May 15, 2017  by  Graham Readfearn
Malcolm Roberts

Sometimes watching YouTube videos is a lot like eating your favorite flavor of chip, fudge, or whatever else it is that has you yearning for more.

You watch one video and then, on that panel on the right hand side, up pops a whole load of others that YouTube thinks you’ll like.

No doubt because of my years of writing about climate science denial, YouTube taunts me with all manner of climate science denier crap — some quite sophisticated, some not.

And so it was that I failed to resist a video entitled Senator Malcolm Roberts — How Climate Actually Works (presumably there’s another video somewhere called President Trump — How Uranium Actually Works.)

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Space Advisory Board Meets Tomorrow, and Tomorrow and Tomorrow

Posted  May 15, 2017  by  Chuck Black
          By Brian Orlotti

The notes from the first and the second Canadian Space Advisory Board (SAB) Roundtables on Canada’s Future in Space, held on April 21st in Ottawa and April 28th in Halifax, have now been posted online.

A friendly reminder that rocket science very rarely has anything to do with politics (or media production). Image c/o @Cmdr_Hadfield.

At first blush, the SAB, rather than seizing the opportunity to restructure Canada’s space efforts in accord with new global realities, has simply opted for the status quo with some added drum-banging for further funding.

Notable excerpts from the SAB notes include a variety of interesting, but generally vague comments, which certainly benefit from the appropriate unpacking. For example:

In an era of fast technological advances and dynamic business models, there is no one size fits all solution.

There is a new business model emerging – often referred to as New Space – that is transformative and government policies and regulations need to adapt to this reality in order to support growth in the sector. 

It may be important to ensure that the Government is equipped to find solutions and has more modern tools (public private partnerships, purchasing services as opposed to assets)

  • This comment, from the April 21st Ottawa meeting, while acknowledging the existence of the NewSpace industry, provides little in the way of exploration of the private-sector funding mechanisms such as the Space Angels Network or Globalive Capital which could enable the Canadian space industry to operate more independently of government.

Globalive Capital, a tech angel investment firm founded in 2013 by Canadian telecom entrepreneur Tony Lacavera, has helped finance at least two Canadian NewSpace companies; Toronto, ON based Kepler Communications and Vancouver, BC based UrtheCast.  

Tony Lacavera at the MaRS Discovery District in January 2017. As outlined in the February 3rd, 2017 Mobile Syrop post, “Tony Lacavera shares the story of building and selling Wind Mobile,” the core concept of entrepreneurship is the understanding and acceptance of risk. Photo c/o Mobile Syrup.  

As stated previously in the January 16th, 2017 post, “Quantum Computing Is Real; A Canadian Company Now Offers Open-Source Tools & the Chinese are Building Spacecraft,” Lacavera has publicly stated his view that Canada has the potential to become a world leader in such fields as artificial intelligence, fintech, machine-learning, autonomous vehicles, and quantum computing, though its institutions must step up their efforts to do so.  

Lacavera also said that Canada’s efforts must go beyond mere presentations and broad allocations of resources; Canada must narrow its actions and focus  specifically on areas where it can win. 

A focus on developing homegrown launch vehicles, for example, would reduce the time-to-market for Canadian space products and services, protect Canada’s space industry from other nations’ punitive trade actions, and place Canada on a more competitive footing vis-a-vis emerging space powers such as China and India.

Canada is viewed as a reliable international partner; re-affirming or affirming international engagement is important for continued long term success. In addition, while collaborating with traditional international partners (NASA, ESA) remains important, there may be greater opportunities with non-traditional and new space faring nations. 

  • This comment, also from the April 21st Ottawa meeting, allows the SAB to reaffirm Canada’s traditional role as a supplier of components and systems for other nations’ space projects. 

Although the rise of new space-faring nations (i.e. China & India) is acknowledged, the SAB avoids mentioning their specific homegrown capabilities, which include domestic launch vehicles. Those indigenous capabilities (rather than the mere ability to manufacture “components“) are what facilitate the independent actions these states currently enjoy.

This lack of interest in expanding Canadian space capability also seems rather myopic in light of the current political upheavals in Europe, rapidly expanding Chinese space efforts and trade-related punitive actions taken (and threatened) against both Canada and Mexico by the US’ ultra-nationalist, protectionist Donald Trump administration. 

Aerospace Industries Association of Canada (AIAC) Executive VP Iain Christie discussing the AIAC’s perception of what a “balanced” space program would be like at the 2016 Space Policy Symposium, which was held in Ottawa on November 8th, 2016. As outlined in the November 22nd, 2016 SpaceQ post, “A Balanced Space Program from the 2016 Space Policy Symposium,” the AIAC presentation focused on complaints about the lack of “a long term plan or vision for what Canada will be doing in space,” plus concern for space companies “that rely in-part on government programs” and are “rapidly running out of short term money with no new significant programs being created.” Evidently, asking for more money for the existing players is “balanced.” Photo c/o SpaceQ.

There is the need for a balanced space program and for a range of activities – flagship programs (e.g. International Space Station), smaller mission activities, science, technology development and capability demonstration – necessary to provide critical flight heritage while sustaining and maintain talent/capabilities in the Canadian space sector. 

Dedicated funding to support new space activities help to grow the sector – many space firms have been created, or established through government programs, which provide important seed money…

This statement, also from the April 21st Ottawa meeting, and apart from the dubiousness of phrases like ‘balanced space program’ (which seems to suggest a hope for continued Canadian Space Agency “dominance” of the domestic space industry and the expectation of the existing players that they will continue to be funded), contains a curious error of omission 

The oversight is NASA’s stated intention to sell the ISS to the private sector by the mid-2020’s. 

As outlined in the March 23rd, 2017 Wired post, ” Somebody Just Buy the ISS Already,” the International Space Station (ISS) is a $70Bln US ($95Bln CDN) engineering marvel that “no one has any idea what to do with.” According to the article, “spending $3 billion to $4 billion annually to keep the ISS running conflicts with NASA’s other ambitions, like visiting Mars.”

Touting the ISS as a “flagship program” in which Canada should continue the status quo when NASA itself is willing to let private industry take control and move on to other challenges would seem a non sequitur at best and deceitful at worst.

There is considerable optimism and excitement regarding plans for a spaceport in the Province of Nova Scotia. 

Developing Canadian launch capabilities may provide new opportunities for economic and regional development (e.g. , jobs creation, skills and talent hub); increased access to space to deploy technologies in space; and public interest and support for the Canadian space program.

This statement, from the April 28th, 2017 Halifax meeting, refers to Maritime Launch Services’ (MLS) thus far unfunded effort to construct a commercial launch facility for Ukrainian-built Cyclone-4M rockets in Nova Scotia. MLS is essentially acting as a local agent for Ukraine-based Yuzhnoye Design Office, which had originally designed the Cyclone-4M rocket for Brazil and requires at least $100Mln CDN in cash or credits to fund any NS based facility.  

As outlined most recently in the February 6th, 2017 post, “Europe Will Fund the Prometheus Reusable Engine; Canada Pitched Cyclone-4’s,” the Cyclone rockets use hypergolic engines–a system in which two components (a fuel and an oxidizer) spontaneously ignite when brought into contact with each other, producing thrust. 

Once used extensively in both US and Soviet ICBMs, hypergolic engines were eventually replaced in both nations’ arsenals by solid-fuel systems. Although simple and reliable, hypergolic engines pose difficulties due to the extreme toxicity and corrosive nature of their fuels. 

Because of this, Western rocketry has largely moved away from hypergolic systems and towards higher performance liquid hydrogen/oxygen engines. 

It is a sad state of affairs indeed for Canada’s space efforts when, in an age of $5Mln US ($6.8Mln CDN) 3D-printed rockets (such as those now being made by California based Rocket Lab), hope is being placed in a company of doubtful financing flogging toxic 1970’s Soviet technology. 

Canada, the third nation on Earth to place a satellite in orbit and a pioneer of robotic, radar and lidar technologies, should demand better of itself

The first SAB Roundtable on Canada’s Future in Space, held on April 21st in Ottawa, was hosted by SAB chair Marie Lucy Stojak, William MacDonald ‘Mac‘ Evans, and Michael Pley.

Attendees included Al Conrad (IMP Aerospace), Arthur Ruff (ISRU Tech Inc.), Sarah Goldfeder (Earnscliffe Strategy Group), Chris Kitzan (Canada Aviation and Space Museum), Christopher Dodd (Airbus Defence & Space Canada, Inc.), Daniel Goldberg (Telesat), David McCabe (Honeywell Aerospace), Eric Choi (Magellan Aerospace), Eva-Jane Lark (BMO Nesbitt Burns Midland Doherty Ltd.), Geoffrey Languedoc (Canadian Aeronautics and Space Institute), Iain Christie (AIAC), Ian Scott (Telesat), Jason Palidwar (Iridian Spectral Technologies), Jim Quick (AIAC), John Detombe (ADGA Group), Larisa Beach (Neptec Design Group Ltd.), Leslie Swartman (MacDonald Dettwiler), Lori M. Wickert (Newmont Mining Corporation), Matt Ivis (MacDonald Dettwiler), Rick Pitre (Terizons Consulting Inc.), Robert A. “Bob” Ryerson (Kim Geomatics Corporation), Ryan Alan Anderson (QShift) and Stewart Bain (NorStar Space Data).

The second SAB Roundtable on Canada’s Future in Space, held on April 28th in Halifax, was hosted by Jim Drummond and Gordon Osinski.

Attendees included Bradley Farquhar (Space Generation Advisory Council), Carl Kumpic (IMP Aerospace and Defence), Desmond Power (C-CORE), Duncan McSporran (Consortium for Aerospace Research and Innovation in Canada), Harvey Doane (Nova Scotia Business Inc.), Howard Moyst (AIME Consulting Inc.), Jeff Burlock (Xplornet Communication Inc.), Luigi Gallo (St. Mary’s University, Department of Astronomy and Physics), Monique Arsenault (Nova Scotia Government), Penny Morrill (Memorial University of Newfoundland, Faculty of Sciences—Earth Sciences), Rich Billiard (Atlantic Alliance of Aerospace and Defense Associations), Rob Thacker (St. Mary’s University, Department of Astronomy and Physics) and Stephen Matier (Maritime Launch Services).

The SAB Roundtable is winding up its formal, semi-public meetings over the next few days, but will continue to meet at undisclosed locations and by invitation only, in preparation for the expected release of their proposal for the Canadian space industry sometime this summer.

Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow…

Brian Orlotti.
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Brian Orlotti is a regular contributor to the Commercial Space blog.

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Neil deGrasse Tyson Laments Climate Science Denial but Billionaire Deniers Fund His Museum

Posted  May 15, 2017  by  Graham Readfearn
Neil deGrasse Tyson

There’s no real way to scientifically establish just how cool, adored, or respected a person is among certain groups.

But a good start might include the number of t-shirts with the person’s face on them, the frequency of memes created with their quotes, or the amount of coffee drunk from mugs bearing their likeness.

On all these important and absolutely non-trivial measures, the astrophysicist, author, and educator Neil deGrasse Tyson looks to be winning.

Tyson is an American superstar of science communication. When primetime networks go looking for an articulate and respected scientist who can speak to the masses, Tyson is a go-to guy.

A few days ahead of the historic March for Science, Tyson released a four-minute video he said contained “what may be the most important words I have ever spoken.”

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Part 9: A History of the Canadian Space Program – Policies & Lessons Learned Coping with Modest Budgets

Posted  May 15, 2017  by  Chuck Black

The 1990’s, The Second Long-Term Space Plan, SCISAT, RADARSAT-2 & “Competitive Procurement

The John H. Chapman Space Centre, completed in 1992. Photo c/o Treasury Board.

By Graham Gibbs & W. M. (“Mac“) Evans

This paper, first presented at the 65th International Astronautical Congress, which was held in Toronto, Ontario from September 29th – October 3rd, 2014, is a brief history of the Canadian space program, written by two of the major participants.

Recognizing that the Canadian government’s investment in space was going to start dropping rapidly in 1994 with the wind down of three major CSA programs, Mobile Satellite (MSAT), RADARSAT and the International Space Station (ISS), the CSA commenced planning for the next long-term space plan. Extensive consultations were held with interest groups across the country and by 1993 the CSA had developed an aggressive set of program proposals for consideration by the government. 

However, in 1993 a new government was elected that embarked on a comprehensive government wide expenditure reduction program and the CSA’s proposals never reached the Cabinet table. In its first budget in February 1994 the new government announced its intention to develop a new long-term space plan (LTSP II) and allocated $800Mln CDN of new funds for the ten year period from 1994/95 to 2003/04.

The government was extremely concerned about the rising costs for Canada’s participation in the ISS program and decided to “negotiate an orderly reduction in Canada’s current commitments to the International Space Station Program.” The government also stated, that if a satisfactory new role for Canada in the program could be negotiated, it would allocate an additional $200Mln CDN for this purpose.

Then Prime Minister Jean Chrétien with Paul Martin, his long-term Finance Minister in 1997. The 1994 Federal budget wasn’t just important for Canada’s space efforts. As outlined in the November 11th, 2011 Economy Watch post, “How Did Canada Turn Its Debt Crisis Around In 6 Years, 20 Years Ago?,” Canada’s budget had included large annual deficits since the 1960’s and was widely regarded by the early 1990’s as the next nation expected to default on outstanding loans. But quick action, in the form of a multi-year deficit reduction programme initiated by the incoming Chrétien government, balanced the budget and restored Canada’s international credit. Photo c/o Fred Chartrand/Canadian Press.

The 1994 Budget marked a distinct change in the government’s approach to space. Prior to this budget, space program proposals were submitted to the government, and if approved, new funds to implement the program would be made available. With the 1994 budget, the government first established the amount of money that it would make available for space and then asked the CSA to develop a plan within the allocated resources. For the first time, the government established a “space envelope.”

For the next three months, an extensive series of concurrent negotiations took place with NASA regarding the ISS and with the Canadian space community regarding LTSP II. A wide-ranging agreement was reached with NASA for “Enhanced Cooperation in Space Between NASA and CSA” that reduced the final costs of Canada’s space station participation by $759Mln CDN without affecting our commitment to provide ISS robotics. The agreement also provided for one Canadian astronaut launch per year, obtained NASA’s participation in RADARSAT 2, and confirmed NASA’s participation in Canada’s SciSat program.

In June 1994, the Minister of Industry, John Manley announced LTSP II, the most comprehensive space plan in Canadian history with more than $1Bln CDN of new program initiatives.

Included in the plan were: RADARSAT 2, a follow-on to the already approved RADARSAT 1 satellite; an advanced satellite communications program that eventually resulted in an experimental payload for the next generation of Telesat satellites; a substantial increase in the space science program, including SciSat, Canada’s first science satellite since ISIS II in 1972; and augmentation of the CSA’s technology development program.

LTSP II also included a new “Space Policy Framework” approved by the government. The framework instructed the CSA to design programming “to lever the maximum possible funding from other interested parties, including the industry and the provinces.” This requirement formed the underlying principle for the agreements with Telesat on the experimental payload for Anik F2 and the agreement with Macdonald Dettwiler (MDA) for RADARSAT 2.

The current impact of the Canadian space sector in 2013 as per the March 27th, 2015 Euroconsult Report on the “Comprehensive Socio-Economic Impact Assessment of the Canadian Space Sector.” Graphic c/o Euroconsult & CSA. 

The framework directed that the “implementation of the Canadian Space Program seek to foster an internationally competitive, export-oriented Canadian space equipment and services sector, open to a growing number of firms, often small and medium-sized enterprises.” This latter requirement effectively put an end to the Prime Contractor policy adopted in the late 1970’s and paved the way for a competitive procurement process for RADARSAT 2 (the first ever competitive procurement for a major government space program).

The framework also noted that the government deems space to be “essential to protect national security and to enhance Canada’s sovereignty in the new political and economic world order” and indicated its desire to see that “a growing degree of synergy will be promoted between civil and non-aggressive defence space activities with a view to contributing to world peace and security… ”. This requirement led to the establishment of liaison offices at Department of National Defence (DND) and CSA and a memorandum of understanding (MOU) outlining cooperation between the two departments.

Finally, the framework indicated the government’s expectation that Federal Departments will “take advantage of the opportunities provided by space- based technology and services to improve their short and long-term efficiency and effectiveness in meeting their mission objectives and will work with the CSA to maximize the degree to which these needs can be met from cost-competitive domestic sources.” 
This requirement provided the underlying policy for the program initiatives that the CSA was then promoting.
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Graham Gibbs & Mac Evans. Photos c/o MyCanada & CSA.
Graham Gibbs represented the Canadian space program for twenty-two years, the final seven as Canada’s first counselor for (US) space affairs based at the Canadian Embassy in Washington, DC. 

He is the author of “Five Ages of Canada – A HISTORY from Our First Peoples to Confederation.”

William MacDonald “Mac” Evans served as the president of the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) from November 1991 to November 2001, where he led the development of the Canadian astronaut and RADARSAT programs, negotiated Canada’s role in the International Space Station (ISS) and contributed to various international agreements that serve as the foundation of Canada’s current international space partnerships.

He currently serves on the board of directors of Vancouver, BC based UrtheCast and as a member of the Federal government Space Advisory Board.

Last Week: Long-Term Space Plan I, a National Space Agency, RADARSAT, Centralization and the Dramatic Increase in Government Space Expenditures,” in part eight of “A History of the Canadian Space Program: Policies & Lessons Learned Coping with Modest Budgets.”

Next Week: “More on the 1990’s, the CSA, “On-Going Budgets,” a 3rd “Long-Term Space Plan,” 
New Astronauts, More Satellites but Never Enough Funding,” as part ten of “A History of the Canadian Space Program: Policies & Lessons Learned Coping with Modest Budgets,” continues.

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“My community has been without drinking water for 15 years”

Posted  May 15, 2017  by  Kathy Shaidle

And yet, we can still hear you bitching. And you always have big screen tvs. And wheels. Which you “appropriated” from us. Like booze. And what would those “senior indigenous journalists” you want up there drink, anyhow? (Besides booze, I mean?) Just move, dumbass. Oh, wait, you did, cuz you’re in a CBC studio and […]

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Review of “The Origins of Cool in Postwar America”

Posted  May 15, 2017  by  Kathy Shaidle

Joseph Epstein isn’t impressed: Simone de Beauvoir is the woman who gets more attention than any other. She and Jean-Paul Sartre were, of course, in Dinerstein’s phrase, “existentialism’s first couple.” But the closer the camera bears in on their lives, the less cool they seem. Dinerstein neglects to mention that Sartre was one of the […]

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JJ McCullough: 5 Sad Facts About Canada (video)

Posted  May 15, 2017  by  Kathy Shaidle
JJ McCullough: 5 Sad Facts About Canada (video)

More from my siteEzra Levant: Time to halt Muslim immigration to Canada (#video)J.J. McCullough: Boxing Day and 9 Other Dumb Canadian Traditions (video)(VIDEO) JJ McCollough: How To Read a Canadian NewspaperNEW J.J. McCullough video: 10 Dumb Canadian Foods

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Guest Post: Local Teacher’s Tips For Cultivating Healthy Classrooms

Posted  May 15, 2017  by  Yoni Freedhoff

One of this blog’s long time readers is a local teacher, Heather Crysdale. On Facebook she regularly adds thoughtful comments to my posts around kids and school – so much so that I asked her if she’d be interested in writing a guest post with some of her ideas on how to make a classroom a healthy place. Happily she agreed! Here are her thoughts – proving that yes, you can cultivate healthy classrooms, it just takes some thought and creativity:

Modelling Healthy Living in a Primary Classroom:

It can be a challenge to create a classroom where healthy activity levels and food choices are promoted. Here are some of the ways I try to promote healthy lifestyles in my classroom.

Modelling Health Activity Levels:

Being an active Role Model:

The students know that I am an older teacher (e.g., 55 plus) and that I make a conscious effort to stay active. They see me walk to school daily with my husband and little dog, rain or shine, in all seasons. I share with them when I plan to go skate skiing, kayaking, cycling or to go to the yoga studio. I think it is important for them to see people of all ages, and genders, being active.

On May 7th (2017) the families in my class raised $500, to support my CN Cycle for CHEO (Ericsson 70 km) ride.

Physical Fitness Embedded in Daily Physical Activities (DPA), Gym and Special Event Days:

During the autumn and the spring, students do a morning run three times a week, and a group dance (Dancemania) twice a week before heading up to class. In the winter, students do body break dances on Go Noodle (https://www.gonoodle.com) or stair climbing in school for their DPA. We also have special fitness based days (e.g., a Winter Walk to School Day, a Bike Day, five days of Skating at Dulude Arena, etc.) With staff and students taking part in these activities, fitness and fun is the goal for everyone!

Modelling Healthy Eating Habits:

Setting an Example with Nutritious Lunches:

When the students see me eating a healthy lunch (e.g., a sandwich, soup, salad and/or leftovers from home), I am modelling good choices for them. When I see students enjoying a healthy food item during a Nutrition Break, I might comment on how tasty the food looks. If a child has a less healthy food item in their lunch bag, it is not up to me to critique the food choice. Food shaming is disrespectful, unhealthy and poor behaviour modelling for a teacher. Packed lunches from home reflect a family’s food culture, food prep skills and/or budget.

Mindful Eating:

At our school, we make a real effort to encourage the students to eat mindfully. At the beginning of the year, I bring in a basket of apples from the Parkdale Market. Each child gets to hold an apple, while listening to the story No Ordinary Apple. A Story About Eating Mindfully. Students are reminded to eat their food slowly and quietly, using all five senses to truly enjoy their food. Students show more gratitude for their food, when they learn how it got to their plate (from seed to platter)!

Food-Free Birthdays Celebrations:

If every birthday in class was celebrated with Pinterest worthy treats, the students would have cupcakes and candies at least 20 times in the school year. In my classroom, I encourage parents to provide food- free birthday treats to celebrate student birthdays. I heard about this idea at an OPHEA (Ontario Physical Health and Education Association) conference. Parents have followed through by sending in dollar store bouncy balls that each child used in the gym, by sending in Perler beads for the students to make Melty bead creations and by donating games and puzzles for the students to enjoy on the birthday, and afterwards too. The students enjoy these birthday games, crafts and puzzles!

Activity Based Holiday Treats:

Special holidays, like Halloween and Valentine’s Day, can mean overindulging in candy corn, caramels, cinnamon hearts and chocolate kisses. Instead, the students might have roasted Pumpkin seeds or fruit skewers as a treat. On these special days, the students in my class usually get a little gift bag from me. Instead of giving them food items, I always make them a handmade, handwritten card. Gift ideas might include themed pencils, erasers, notebooks, books and passes to skate or swim at City of Ottawa pools and arenas. The students enjoy the writing, reading and sporting activities!

Sugar and Salt Free Math Activities:

Instead of using food items for graphing and sorting, the students in my class use Legos, plastic counters and other reusable manipulatives. Or, they use seasonal materials found in nature (e.g., leaves, pine cones and oak keys). They still enjoy sorting and graphing, without having to eat unhealthy foods in the process.

A Focus on Intrinsic vs. Extrinsic Rewards:

One of the tenets of our Alternative school is that we do not give out rewards for good behaviour, effort or work. The goal is to have students behave well, make an effort and work hard, and then experience the intrinsic satisfaction of a job well done. That means no stickers or other extrinsic rewards…and therefore no candies or other sugary treats!

Tower Gardening:

One of my teaching colleagues, Tiiu Tsao, is growing greens in her classroom (e.g., Leaf lettuce, Yau Choy and Basil). She has borrowed the Tower Garden from the Parkdale Food market. The students had an opportunity to taste the produce that they grew. Pure Kitchen is purchasing the produce for its restaurant. Profits from the sale of these greens to Pure Kitchen are then returned to the Parkdale Food Market. What a great way to learn about fresh food growing, harvesting and eating!

On these special days, the students in my class usually get a little gift bag from me. Instead of giving them food items, I always make them a handmade, handwritten card. Gift ideas might include themed pencils, erasers, notebooks, books and passes to skate or swim at City of Ottawa pools and arenas. The students enjoy the writing, reading and sporting activities!

Growing Up Organic:

Several other colleagues are working toward creating an on-site school garden. Growing Up Organic (a garden and farm based educational program for children) is providing startup workshops for students. The workshops include the following topics: soil exploration, seed saving, planning a garden, planting a salad garden, seed starting and transplanting. The goal is to teach students greater food literacy and food skills. Ideally, they hope to create a sustainable garden that produces produce that can be shared amongst community members, including the Parkdale Food Centre.

Conclusion:

It takes a community to create an environment where children can learn, by example and through practice, to develop life-long fitness and nutritional habits. Together, we can make a difference!

Heather Crysdale is a teacher at Churchill Alternative Public School. She has been teaching in the Public School system for over 30 years. In 2014, Heather was awarded the Ottawa Carleton District School Board (OCDSB) Staff Health and Safety Award, for making an outstanding and significant contribution, over an extended period of time, to Health and Safety. Heather has been married to Douglas Abraham for 25 years. She is the mother of two twenty-something young men. Heather enjoys paddling her sprint kayak on the Rideau River. She likes to swim, cycle and skate ski in the Gatineau Park, and practice yoga at Pure Yoga. She is constantly seeking ways to move and eat well as well as to promote healthy lifestyles. In her spare time she likes to make cards and to knit!

The opinions expressed in this post are the author’s own and do not necessarily reflect the ideas of the Ottawa Carleton District School Board.

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Quirks & Question

Posted  May 15, 2017  by  podcasting@cbc.ca

Why Don’t we harvest cadaver blood?

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Money-puck

Posted  May 15, 2017  by  podcasting@cbc.ca

Analytics in hockey is the focus of a conference in Ottawa.

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Re-evaluating the origins of life

Posted  May 15, 2017  by  podcasting@cbc.ca

Life likely existed in Australia three and one-half billion years ago.

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Neuro-privacy

Posted  May 15, 2017  by  podcasting@cbc.ca

Protecting our neuro-privacy in a future of brain computer interfaces.

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A dinosaur goes Hollywood

Posted  May 15, 2017  by  podcasting@cbc.ca

The Royal Ontario Museum unveiled anklyosaur, nicknamed zuul from Ghostbusters.

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Human’s Smell

Posted  May 15, 2017  by  podcasting@cbc.ca

Human sense of smell is better than we think.

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Vandalize it. It isn’t private property, so I have no principled objection.

Posted  May 14, 2017  by  Kathy Shaidle

You think I’m kidding. More from my siteSavagesPlease sign this petition supporting property rights and libertyThe human right to work as an old stripper, whether the club owner wants you or not‘Rothbard was an anarchist, but also a capitalist’

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“How the right’s think tanks stopped thinking”

Posted  May 14, 2017  by  Kathy Shaidle

F.H. Buckley writes: You’ll find the same kind of creative destruction in the idea factories on the right, in their think tanks and little magazines. The Heritage Foundation lost its president last week, but had lost its intellectual edge years before. Its moment, and that of the other great conservative think tanks, had passed. They […]

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Are Solar and Wind Really Killing Coal, Nuclear, and Grid Reliability?

Posted  May 14, 2017  by  guest
Rick Perry and the Texas power grid

By Joshua D. RhodesMichael E. WebberThomas Deetjen, and Todd Davidson, University of Texas at Austin

U.S. Secretary of Energy Rick Perry in April requested a study to assess the effect of renewable energy policies on nuclear and coal-fired power plants. The Conversation

Some energy analysts responded with confusion, as the subject has been extensively studied by grid operators and the Department of Energy’s own national labs. Others were more critical, saying the intent of the review is to favor the use of nuclear and coal over renewable sources.

So, are wind and solar killing coal and nuclear? Yes, but not by themselves and not for the reasons most people think.

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Crêpes

Posted  May 13, 2017  by  Julie

This is just a recipe for crêpes – I promise you don’t have to stack them, smeared with lemon curd and cream (above) or Nutella and stacked into a cake unless you want to. I consider crêpes an essential thing to know how to make – there is nothing like standing at the stove, rhythmically pouring and tilting batter in the bottom of a hot pan, then spreading hot crêpes with butter, sprinkling them with brown sugar and a shake of cinnamon, rolling them up and doling them out, to make everything feel right in the world on a weekend morning. (Lately I’ve been eating mine with large spoonfuls of cold stewed rhubarb and a blop of plain yogurt.) Everyone should know how to make a batch of crêpes, and not be intimidated by the process – the best way to learn is to practice, to get a feel for quickly tilting the pan to cover the bottom with batter as it cooks. And evenContinue reading

The post Crêpes appeared first on Dinner With Julie.

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Maybe I should just leave this picture up forever…

Posted  May 13, 2017  by  Kathy Shaidle
Maybe I should just leave this picture up forever…

More from my site‘What he’s saying is merely that Hitler’s after us and we must all get together and have a good hate’Rick McGinnis had a personal brush with “fake news” that stuck with him forever“Who on earth wants to live forever with the people who want to live forever?”“Creative women with less attractive faces […]

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Jordan Cove LNG Backers Spend Huge Money to Sway Tiny Oregon County Election

Posted  May 13, 2017  by  Anonymous
No LNG signs, opposing Jordan Cove LNG project

Two weeks ahead of an Oregon county special election, backers of the multi-billion dollar Jordan Cove Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) project are spending an additional $236,500 to prevent that vote from halting the proposed fossil fuel project.

That’s on top of the $359,000 the LNG project’s proponents had previously spent in an attempt to defeat the ballot measure, 6-162, in Coos County, Oregon, which reportedly has roughly 41,000 registered voters. 

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Saturday Stories: Sewer Viruses, Nuremberg, and Stillborn Photography

Posted  May 13, 2017  by  Yoni Freedhoff

Azeen Ghorayshi on Buzzfeed on life saving sewer viruses.

Lesley Stahls’ interview for 60 minutes on what the last surviving Nuremberg prosecutor wants the world to know.

Seema Marwaha in Macleans on photography and stillborns.

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People Don’t Trust Scientific Research When Companies Are Involved

Posted  May 12, 2017  by  guest
lab coats

By John C. Besley, Aaron M. McCright, Kevin Elliott, and Nagwan Zahry of Michigan State University and Joseph D. Martin of University of Leeds

A soda company sponsoring nutrition research. An oil conglomerate helping fund a climate-related research meeting. Does the public care who’s paying for science? The Conversation

In a word, yes. When industry funds science, credibility suffers. And this does not bode well for the types of public-private research partnerships that appear to be becoming more prevalent as government funding for research and development lags.

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Ready to Share – May 2017

Posted  May 12, 2017  by  Liberal Party of Canada

#RealChange, Ready to Share is a regular publication from the Liberal Party of Canada showcasing the latest and greatest news in a convenient format! Check out the latest stories from the party and then share, share, share!

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I’m Not Sure My Mom Knows How To Text

Posted  May 12, 2017  by  Yoni Freedhoff

But Jimmy Kimmel’s staffs’ moms sure do, and here they are for your Mother’s Day Funny Friday

Have a great weekend!

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CATAAlliance Calls for Adaption of the US Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program

Posted  May 11, 2017  by  Chuck Black
          By Chuck Black

The Canadian Advanced Technology Alliance (CATAAlliance), has called for the adaption of the US developed Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant program, often used to fund small space focused start-ups, as a way to encourage and grow Canadian innovation.

To see the complete video, please click on the graphic above. Graphic c/o CATAAlliance.

As outlined in the May 8th, 2017 CATAAlliance press release, “A proven model for the creation of Innovative Solutions Canada,” the organization cited the intent of the Federal government under Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to “provide up to $50 million, starting in 2017–18, to launch a new procurement program, Innovative Solutions Canada, modeled on the very successful US Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program.”

But the press release also noted that the SBIR program, as structured in the US, is funded through mandatory set-asides of departmental funds. As outlined in the press release, the US Small Business Administration (SBA) ensures that participants in the program dedicate 3.2% of their total budgets towards the SBIR program, plus an additional “set- aside” (approximately 23% in the US) for use to procure any developed goods and services from the SBIR small businesses, as required.

As outlined in the CATAAlliance press release, “the intent now is to ensure our government incorporates BOTH of these into the final legislation,” to insure appropriate funding.” The press release noted that the Ontario provincial Health Technologies Fund, is also based on the US SBIR model.

As outlined on the Federal Government Buy and Sell procurement website under the title, “Decision to Set Aside a Procurement under the Procurement Strategy for Aboriginal Business,” this is a process fully understood by the Federal government, at least within Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC), where INAC frequently acts as the first customer and reference site for new products.

NASA Hallmark videos feature companies and successful technologies developed through NASA’s SBIR and small business technology transfer (STTR) programs. To see a sampling of the videos, simply click on the links. Image c/o NASA.  


The Canadian Space Agency (CSA) has always had difficulties wrapping its head around the concept of SBIR programs and the idea of assisting small business to grow and compete with larger, more established firms.

As outlined as far back as the July 19th, 2009 post, “Canadian Space Agency Provides “No Dedicated Programs” to Support Small Aerospace Firms,” it was noted that “when compared to organizations like the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the European Space Agency (ESA) and others, the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) has ‘no dedicated programs for small business.’
Instead, and as outlined in a variety of historical articles on this blog, the Canadian government has focused on “capacity building” or building up one or two large domestic firms like Spar Aerospace, Bombardier, Nortel or MacDonald Dettwiler (MDA) into powerhouses capable of competing against large foreign firms in international markets.

Of course, mostly that doesn’t work. It’s hard to pick winners at the best of times. Spar and Nortel are dead and Bombardier and MDA are undergoing their own challenges.

Perhaps the Federal government will try something a little more inclusive this time. Something like the SBIR program.

Chuck Black.
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Chuck Black is the editor of the Commercial Space blog.

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Trump’s New Era of Industry Self-Regulation Begins for Oil by Rail

Posted  May 11, 2017  by  Anonymous
Crossing train tracks

In case you were wondering how industry-friendly the federal government is becoming, look no futher than Representative Jeff Denham (R-CA), chair of the Congressional Subcommittee on Railroads, Pipelines, and Hazardous Materials. He recently opened a hearing on pipeline and rail regulations with the following sentiment: 

Regulation has grown significantly in recent years and so we are here to ask stakeholders about the impact and burden of regulation on their businesses and ways to ease the burden without compromising safety.” 

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“American Jewish humor, born of the ultimate border-crossing culture, has become the comedy of the global elite”

Posted  May 11, 2017  by  Kathy Shaidle

Peter Berger writes: I had encountered this before. My first full-time teaching job was at the Woman’s College of the University of North Carolina. Residents of the state paid little tuition, so most of the students came from small towns in North Carolina. (At the time there was nothing that could be called a metropolitan […]

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“When I got into it on Twitter with (…) Howard Dean, I could have stopped at just calling him a moron…”

Posted  May 11, 2017  by  Kathy Shaidle

David Cole writes: In reality, Governor Slaton acted well within his proper legal authority when he commuted Leo Frank’s death sentence, and SCOTUS acted well within its proper legal authority when it issued a stay of Ed Johnson’s execution. But the mob didn’t care, because the mob—encouraged by local politicians and community leaders—managed to convince […]

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Gavin McInnes on the new “Battle of New Orleans”: A “civil war over the Civil War”

Posted  May 11, 2017  by  Kathy Shaidle

Gavin McInnes writes: One of the reasons the politicians and their anarchist lackeys failed is they are terrible at their jobs. The word got out that local white guilt peddler John Cummings was paying for the destruction of these monuments so he could put them in his slavery museum. The Whitney Plantation is a bizarre […]

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How Employee Monitoring Tool Helps in Boosting Employees’ Productivity?

Posted  May 11, 2017  by  Anonymous

As an employer, it is very obvious that you will think about employees’ productivity. Also, you may be deliberating on ways to monitor the employee desktop activities. As the debate will always be there on whether to opt for employee monitoring tool or not, there are various reasons that very well support employee desktop monitoring, … Continue reading How Employee Monitoring Tool Helps in Boosting Employees’ Productivity?

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If You Serve It, We Will Eat It (Ontario Medical Association Edition)

Posted  May 11, 2017  by  Yoni Freedhoff

For the past 4 years or so (not sure exactly), I’ve been a delegate to the Ontario Medical Association and as such, along with a few hundred of my MD peers, attend their biannual council meetings.

The councils are each a terrific opportunity to see the passion and energy of my colleagues, and also a great opportunity to see how strongly our food environment impacts upon our freedom of choice.

22g of sugar (4.5tsp) per bar (more than in a Snickers)

Short version? Because all of the MDs here are human, when faced with indulgent dietary choices, they choose them.

Soft drinks, potato chips, pastries, and candy bars (Clif bars with as much sugar as a Snickers) – all of these are offered to us during our meals and snacks.

Offered at lunchtime. By afternoon break, 2 bags remained

And guess what? Once offered, away they go.

And yet I’d be willing to wager that were these options not provided by the council organizers, not a single physician would have walked over to the hotel’s variety shop to buy them.

If even the Ontario Medical Association enables and encourages terrible dietary choices at physician events, why would anyone expect better from others?

Until we stop leaning on the theoretical ability of people “just saying no” as the sole means to address a food environment that offers and pushes nutritional chaff at every turn, we’re not likely to ever see change.

        
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Secretly Approved in Alaska, Will LNG Trains Soon Appear in Rest of US?

Posted  May 10, 2017  by  Anonymous
Alaska Railroad train crossing a bridge in Alaska

In 2015, a federal rail agency authorized the Alaska Railroad Corporation to ship its first batch of liquefied natural gas (LNG) by rail in Alaska, but granted this permission behind closed doors, according to documents obtained by the Center for Biological Diversity (CBD) and provided to DeSmog.

The documents, a series of letters and legal memoranda obtained through the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), show that the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) may have violated the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) by permitting the shipping of LNG, a highly combustible and flammable material, via rail without any public notification or comment period. The agency granted the Alaska Railroad Corporation a legal exemption under 49 C.F.R. § 174.63(a).

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Mark Steyn: “I have disliked James Comey ever since discovering he was the fellow who sent Martha Stewart to jail…”

Posted  May 10, 2017  by  Kathy Shaidle

…for supposedly lying to the FBI in a matter for which there was no underlying crime. Comey, whatever one feels about him, is no liar: He’s been entirely upfront about his bizarre trashing of procedural norms. The only mystery is why he chose to do it, other than for some freaky narcissistic need to make […]

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Hey, who’s up for a 3+ hour conversation about “Mommy Dearest

Posted  May 10, 2017  by  Kathy Shaidle

More from my siteHey, who’s up for a 2+ hour conversation about ‘In a Lonely Place’ (1950)Hey, who’s up for a 4+ hour conversation about “They Live” (1988)?Hey, who’s up for a 2+ hour conversation about ‘Detour’?Hey, who’s up for a two and a half hour long conversation about ‘Faster, Pussycat! Kill! Kill!’ (1965)?

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Conservative Groups Pushing Trump To Exit Paris Climate Deal Have Taken Millions From Koch Brothers, Exxon

Posted  May 10, 2017  by  Graham Readfearn

The “conservative groups” urging President Donald Trump to withdraw from the Paris climate change agreement have accepted tens of millions of dollars from groups linked to the billionaire petrochemical brothers Charles and David Koch, ExxonMobil and the Mercer family.

More than 40 groups have co-signed an open letter urging Trump to keep his campaign promise and “withdraw fully from the Paris Climate Treaty”.

The groups, including the Competitive Enterprise Institute (CEI), The Heartland Institute and the Heritage Foundation, claim failing to withdraw from the treaty could put Trump’s policy agenda of promoting fossil fuels at risk.

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Emails Show Spectra Lobbyists Cozy With Top Massachusetts Environmental Officials

Posted  May 9, 2017  by  Anonymous
Massachusetts Secretary of Energy and Environmental Affairs Matthew Beaton speaking

As Spectra Energy was seeking state permits for its natural gas projects running though Massachusetts, company lobbyists maintained a close and ongoing relationship with top state environmental officials, according to emails obtained exclusively by DeSmog through an open records request. 

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