BlogsCanada.ca
Top Canadian Blogs and News Sites


 
 

LATEST POSTS !

 

 
General

Quirks & Quarks is celebrating the 50th anniversary of Armstrong and Aldrin putting the first human bootprints on the Moon.

Posted  July 19, 2019  by  Anonymous

50 years ago we walked on the moon, and it transformed life on Earth

Full Story »

 
General

Obsession-Worthy Peanut Butter Cookie Ice Cream

Posted  June 29, 2019  by  Angela (Oh She Glows)

Many years ago, I was reading a blog post by a blogger I’d been following for a while. She wrote about a recent struggle with depression and her honest words made such an impact on me. I remember thinking how brave it was for her to tell her story. While I hated that she was […]

Full Story »

 
Christmas

Flourless Peanut Butter Cookies

Posted  June 29, 2019  by  Angela (Oh She Glows)

photo credit: Ashley McLaughlin  Comments (2) | Share on Facebook | Tweet | Pin It | Snapchat | © copyright 2019 Oh She Glows. All Rights Reserved.

Full Story »

 
General

Quirks & Quarks is on hiatus. There will be no more podcasts until the July 20th Apollo 11 anniversary special

Posted  June 28, 2019  by  Anonymous

Podcast placeholder leading up to July 20

Full Story »

 
General

Your Wi-Fi router could be used to watch you breathe and monitor your heartbeat

Posted  June 21, 2019  by  Anonymous

Your Wi-Fi router could be used to watch you in your home

Full Story »

 
General

We’ve bred dogs to have expressive eyebrows that manipulate our emotions

Posted  June 21, 2019  by  Anonymous

Dogs expressive eyebrows make us fall for their cute faces

Full Story »

 
General

Do electric car batteries take more CO2 to make than they save?

Posted  June 21, 2019  by  Anonymous

Do electric car batteries take more CO2 to make than they save?

Full Story »

 
General

A face-eating parasite is devastating Darwin’s famous Galapagos finches

Posted  June 21, 2019  by  Anonymous

Darwin’s finches are being devastated by beak parasites

Full Story »

 
General

AI is now learning to do things it hasn’t been taught

Posted  June 21, 2019  by  Anonymous

An AI learned numeracy while being trained for another task

Full Story »

 
General

Do your genes smell bad? DNA shows what our noses know

Posted  June 21, 2019  by  Anonymous

Honing in on why some people think beets taste and smell like dirt

Full Story »

 
General

A research assistant named Spongebob? Sea sponges collect data for science

Posted  June 21, 2019  by  Anonymous

Sea sponges are better than scientists at DNA collection

Full Story »

 
General

Bonobo mothers act as wing-mums for their sons

Posted  June 21, 2019  by  Anonymous

Bonobo mothers act as matchmakers for their sons

Full Story »

 
General

The Once-Gweat Wabble of Wowdy Webels…

Posted  June 21, 2019  by  Balbulican

It’s been been a while since I checked in on my favourite “fearless source of news, opinion, and activism that you can’t find anywhere else”. I was therefore shocked – shocked! – to discover that the Rebel appears in the…

Full Story »

 
General

Trans Mountain Pipeline Approved

Posted  June 18, 2019  by  bigcitylib

…but far from built. I’ve talked about this  before.  My opinion is that Trudeau did the right thing by approving the pipeline.  You can’t really rule this country if the entire middle bit hates your guts because you took away the…

Full Story »

 
General

Should we have humans in space? A Quirks & Quarks public debate

Posted  June 14, 2019  by  Anonymous

In our first ever Quirks & Quarks public debate, recorded live in Toronto, astronaut Chris Hadfield, cosmologist Renée Hložek, planetary scientist Marianne Mader and space flight historian Amy Shira Teitel weigh in on whether we should leave space to the robots. An extended podcast edition includes Q&A segments not in the radio broadcast.

Full Story »

 
General

“Have I read anything you’ve written?”

Posted  June 10, 2019  by  Marijke Vroomen-Durning

I’ve been asked a few times, “Have I read anything you’ve written?” My first smart-ass instinct is to reply, “I don’t know, what do you read?” But I don’t. Because for some people, meeting a writer is surprising. They don’t know what to say and that’s …

Full Story »

 
General

Mann Wins!!!! Frontier Centre for Public Policy FOLDS!!!!!!!!!!!!

Posted  June 7, 2019  by  bigcitylib

Congratulations to Dr. Michael Mann for successfully putting the boots to Winnipeg’s Frontier Centre for Public Policy.  They defamed him; he fought back and won.  See their grovelling apology below.  Bask in their tears.  &nbs…

Full Story »

 
General

We’re consuming a lot of plastic and have no idea of the risks

Posted  June 7, 2019  by  Anonymous

Microplastics are everywhere – including in your food and drink

Full Story »

 
General

The elephant’s mathematical trunk can smell numbers

Posted  June 7, 2019  by  Anonymous

Elephants can smell numbers – sort of

Full Story »

 
General

Depressing conclusion as new research reverses 25 years of research

Posted  June 7, 2019  by  Anonymous

25 years of research on the genetics of depression is wrong

Full Story »

 
General

Concussion symptoms reversed in mice using magnetic therapy

Posted  June 7, 2019  by  Anonymous

Magnetic stimulation may reverse concussion symptoms in the future

Full Story »

 
General

Do auroras occur on other planets and moons?

Posted  June 7, 2019  by  Anonymous

They occur on Mars and other planets, not on the moon

Full Story »

 
General

Canada is using science to lay claim to the North Pole

Posted  June 7, 2019  by  Anonymous

How we’re trying to prove we own the North Pole

Full Story »

 
General

Infection Following Natural Disasters – Take Care

Posted  June 2, 2019  by  Marijke Vroomen-Durning

Following every natural disaster, we see television news and online videos of destruction. Images of destroyed homes, cars and trucks flipped over, and boats well inland instead of in the water, show us the massive damage nature can cause. But for the thousands who are living through the seemingly unprecedented number of tornadoes, serious storms, and flooding, it’s not a video. It’s very real. The disasters are leaving thousands of families uprooted, with some losing loved ones.

But after the storms have passed over and the waters have receded, after the news cameras leave and people stop taking videos, the residents are left with not only putting their lives back together, but with the potential of serious illness or injury, after the fact.


While the emergency is occurring, the most important issue is survival. This means taking cover or evacuating. But once the imminent threat has left, other dangers may lurk. From broken water and sewage systems to terrified wild animals, survivors may be exposed to dangers they’ve never faced before.


Infection following a natural disaster is common in many areas. Infections can spread quickly in crowded shelters. People who walk around the disaster area can injure themselves by tripping on debris. They can cut themselves while trying to move things or be hit by material that may still be falling. Frightened pets and wild animals may be driven into unfamiliar territory and may bite.


With so many tornadoes touching down in North America this spring, I thought it would be a good idea to discuss the topic. A while ago, I wrote about the connection between national disasters for Sepsis Alliance, an organization I work with. If you would like to read more about the types of infections that could follow a natural disaster, visit Sepsis and Natural Disasters, found on the Sepsis Alliance website.


Full Story »

 
General

Video games aren’t corrupting young minds – they may be building them

Posted  May 31, 2019  by  Anonymous

Video games might be just the homework your kids need this summer

Full Story »

 
General

Don’t bury or cremate – soon you may compost your corpse

Posted  May 31, 2019  by  Anonymous

People in Washington will soon be able to turn their loved ones into soil

Full Story »

 
General

Drink like an Egyptian – 5000 year old yeast is resurrected to brew ancient beer

Posted  May 31, 2019  by  Anonymous

Ancient beer comes back to life using 5,000 year old yeast

Full Story »

 
General

Did our ancestors evolve to walk upright because of supernovae?

Posted  May 31, 2019  by  Anonymous

Supernovae might have been the trigger for our ancestors to descend from the trees

Full Story »

 
General

Right whales were in the wrong place because of the wrong climate

Posted  May 31, 2019  by  Anonymous

Right whales are dying from ship strikes thanks to climate change

Full Story »

 
General

Flying food for fish? Tiger sharks are somehow eating songbirds

Posted  May 24, 2019  by  Anonymous

How have sharks developed a taste for twittering songbirds?

Full Story »

 
General

Fungus fossils shows the complexity of Earth’s life a billion-years-ago

Posted  May 24, 2019  by  Anonymous

Billion-year-old fungus fossils shed light into ancient evolutionary history

Full Story »

 
General

Scientists create robot-like biomaterial with key traits of life

Posted  May 24, 2019  by  Anonymous

Building machine-like biomaterial with key traits of life

Full Story »

 
General

What happens to oil spills after dispersant is used?

Posted  May 24, 2019  by  Anonymous

Dispersant breaks oil down into droplets, where bacteria break them down further,

Full Story »

 
General

Ancient beavers as big as bears died out because of their woodless diet

Posted  May 24, 2019  by  Anonymous

The giant beaver did not eat wood, which led to its extinction

Full Story »

 
General

No, really, calculus can be beautiful and this mathematician will tell us why

Posted  May 24, 2019  by  Anonymous

Finding the beauty in a dreaded subject: calculus

Full Story »

 
General

Erin Weir Debacle Will Haunt Jagmeet Singh

Posted  May 24, 2019  by  leftdog

The Erin Weir debacle continues to haunt the federal New Democrats. It underscores party leader Jagmeet Singh’s seeming policy confusion and calls into question his political judgment.

It just won’t go away.

Weir is the Regina MP who was expelled from the NDP caucus last year and barred from running again for the party. His sin? He had dared to defend himself against charges of sexual harassment.

This week, the 37-year-old, lifelong New Democrat conceded that he won’t run under his party’s banner in the fall election. Nor will he run as an independent. He will sit this one out.

The Weir saga began with a 2018 email from NDP MP Christine Moore to fellow caucus members claiming that he had harassed not her but other, unnamed women. Singh almost immediately suspended Weir from caucus, while his office began a search for women willing to complain. Eventually, four were found. Three said Weir stood too close to them when talking and didn’t know when to shut up. The fourth said he had twice yelled at her over the issue of carbon tariffs — once during a policy debate and again later in an elevator.

At another time, these complaints might have been kept in perspective. But in the #MeToo frenzy of 2018, they were viewed as unforgivable political crimes. Weir was ordered to apologize to the “survivors” and take sensitivity training. He readily agreed, but with one exception. He didn’t see why he should apologize to someone for having heated words over a policy issue — even if that someone were female.

When his accuser was quoted anonymously on CBC, Weir responded to media requests for his side of the story. That, it seemed, was truly unpardonable. Singh expelled him from caucus and barred him from running for the NDP in the fall federal election.

In particular, Singh faulted him “for diminishing the finding of harassment by claiming that this was in fact a policy disagreement.” “It’s a bit Orwellian,” Weir told me in telephone interview this week. “If you try to defend yourself, it only proves that you’re guilty.”

In January, the Regina-Lewvan NDP constituency association asked Singh to reconsider and let Weir contest the nomination. Singh refused. Earlier, 68 prominent Saskatchewan New Democrats, including 13 former MPs, made a similar pitch. Singh dismissed that plea as coming from “people in a position of privilege.”

It was a comment that didn’t go over well in Saskatchewan.

The NDP will rue its treatment of Weir. It has been not only unfair but unproductive. A former economist for the Steelworkers Union, Weir has a keen understanding of the political economy of his home province.

On the issue of energy pipelines, for instance, he understands both the need to combat global warming and the dollars-and-cents reality of his constituents.

He favours construction of the controversial Trans Mountain pipeline expansion from Alberta’s tarsands to the Pacific Coast. In part that’s because the pipes for such a project are manufactured in Regina. In part, it’s because “to the extent that we continue to use oil,” pipelines are the safest way to move petroleum.

He says he is baffled that “the current leadership” of his party has taken no position on carbon pricing, given that this issue promises to be central to the October election.

He’s equally baffled that Singh opposes all oil pipelines but appears to favour building new natural gas pipelines in British Columbia. (In fact, the NDP leader has suggested, at different times, that he both supports and opposes a plan to pipe B.C. natural gas to the Pacific Coast for liquefaction and export to Asia.)

Many New Democrats will disagree with Weir on the pipeline question. But he’s right that the party needs to clarify its muddled position.

He’s also right that vigorous debate between those who happen to be men and those who happen to be women shouldn’t automatically be treated as sexual harassment. Such an approach does no sex any favours.

Thomas Walkom is a Toronto-based columnist covering politics. Follow him on Twitter: @tomwalkom

The  Star

Full Story »

 
General

Just a Coincidence the Final Episode Airs This Weekend?

Posted  May 18, 2019  by  Balbulican
Full Story »

 
General

Dementia: It’s More Than Alzheimer’s Disease

Posted  May 13, 2019  by  Marijke Vroomen-Durning

Say the word “dementia,” and most people think about Alzheimer’s disease. We can’t blame them; Alzheimer’s disease affects almost 6 million Americans and many millions more across the world. It is the most common cause of dementia. But d…

Full Story »

 
General

Do Celebrities Owe Us Health Information? Prince Harry & Meghan Markle, for example

Posted  May 6, 2019  by  Marijke Vroomen-Durning

It’s all over the news – a new royal has been born. Prince Harry’s glowing announcement of his son’s birth was delightful. He was awed and in love. But how much does he owe the public about the details and photos, and everything else people want to kno…

Full Story »

 
General

The Impenetrable Genius of Donald J. Trump

Posted  May 2, 2019  by  Anonymous

[(A guest blogpost by my slightly right-of-centre friend Peter. Enjoy. Discuss. ~DD)] Nobody really likes him. At least, nobody will publicly defend his character and integrity. He has no discernible political principles. He is a vainglorious boaster and moral alley-cat…

Full Story »