BlogsCanada.ca
Top Canadian Blogs and News Sites


 
 

LATEST POSTS !

 

 
0
comments
General

JJ McCullough: Weird National Anthems

Posted  May 22, 2017  by  Kathy Shaidle
JJ McCullough: Weird National Anthems

More from my siteJim Goad: An Evil Virus Called PopulismNEW J.J. McCullough video: 10 Dumb Canadian Foods(VIDEO) JJ McCollough: How To Read a Canadian NewspaperJ.J. McCullough: Boxing Day and 9 Other Dumb Canadian Traditions (video)

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

“The Naked Kiss (1964) may be described as the best movie Douglas Sirk never made”

Posted  May 22, 2017  by  Kathy Shaidle
“The Naked Kiss (1964) may be described as the best movie Douglas Sirk never made”

Samuel Fuller developed a reputation over time of being the tough guy director of movies like Pickup on South Street (1953), The Steel Helmet (1951) and The Big Red One (1980). This is all well and good but his films have a sense of style, and insight at their core, that belies the notion that […]

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

Rover Pipeline Owner Disputing Millions Owed After Razing Historic Ohio Home

Posted  May 21, 2017  by  Steve Horn
Rover pipeline about to be laid underground next to a home in Ohio

After taking heat last fall for destroying sacred sites of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, the owner of the Dakota Access pipeline finds itself embattled anew over the preservation of historic sites, this time in Ohio.

Documents filed with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) show that Energy Transfer Partners is in the midst of a dispute with the Ohio State Historic Preservation Office over a $1.5 million annual payment owed to the state agency as part of a five-year agreement signed in February.

Energy Transfer Partners was set to pay the preservation office in exchange for bulldozing the Stoneman House, a historic home built in 1843 in Dennison, Ohio, whose razing occurred duing construction of the Rover pipeline. Rover is set to carry natural gas obtained via hydraulic fracturing (“fracking”) from the Utica Shale and Marcellus Shale — up to 14 percent of it — through the state of Ohio. The pipeline owner initially bulldozed the historic home, located near a compressor station, without notifying FERC, as the law requires.

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

Atlantic Coast Pipeline Corporate Backers Fund Faulty Pro-Pipeline Poll

Posted  May 20, 2017  by  guest
Pipeline construction sign

This is a guest post by  and originally appeared on LittleSis.org.

On May 9th, 2017, a group called EnergySure tweeted:

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

Back Monday morning-ish…

Posted  May 20, 2017  by  Kathy Shaidle
Back Monday morning-ish…

More from my siteI’ll be back Monday morning…I’ll be back Monday morning…I’ll be back Monday morningStill a work in progress

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

Saturday Stories: Slavery, Young Physicians, and Sexism

Posted  May 20, 2017  by  Yoni Freedhoff

Alex Tizon in The Atlantic with an article on modern day slavery that I can’t imagine you haven’t read, but on the off chance, find some time and do so.

Suzanne Koven in The New England Journal of Medicine with her letter to a young female physician.

Eve Forster in Vox on sexism in science and her telling social experiment.

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

TrailersFromHell: “She Demons” (1958), an early Naziploitation effort

Posted  May 19, 2017  by  Kathy Shaidle
TrailersFromHell: “She Demons” (1958), an early Naziploitation effort

More from my siteDark Corners tackles early Nazisploitation flick ‘She Demons’ (1958) – at my requestHonest Trailers: ‘Forrest Gump’Dear Muslims: This is why people hate you.If you forwarded your email exchange with Khurrum Awan to me in June 2008, please get in touch

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

MOTHERFUCKIN’ NEWS ALERT!!! TABBY’S STAR IS DIPPING!

Posted  May 19, 2017  by  bigcitylib
ALERT:@tsboyajian‘s star is dipping

This is not a drill.

Astro tweeps on telescopes in the next 48 hours: spectra please!

— Jason Wright (@Astro_Wright) May 19, 2017

This is what you should be paying attention to now.  Fuck that bullshit with that Trump asshole.  There is a small but non-zero chance that the dips are being caused by a MOTHERFUCKIN’ ALIEN MEGA-STRUCTURE!!!!   YYYUUUGE, BABY!   The size of JUPITER at least and maybe one of many such structures orbiting  KIC8462852, a star 1,600 light years away, in the direction of Uranus, a really dark and hairy part of the night sky.

But seriously.  There’s a real news story about it here.

But that’s the only one.  Everything else is about that orange haired fucktard making an idiot of himself in lands far away.  THIS SHIT IS WAY MORE IMPORTANT!!!!  If it really is aliens, we can pray to them and slaughter people in their name, and then maybe get taken away to some planet on the other side of the galaxy that’s all like California as our reward.

Or it could be a bunch of stupid comets.  But I’m hopin’.

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

Don Blankenship, Fresh Out of Prison, Begs Trump to Have Mercy on Coal Execs

Posted  May 19, 2017  by  Ben Jervey
Stone memorial with the outline of the 29 coal workers killed in the Upper Big Branch explosion

Don Blankenship, who just wrapped up a year in federal prison for criminal conspiracy to violate mine safety and health rules — a coordinated and concealed series of violations that lasted for at least 15 months leading up to the tragic Upper Big Branch mine explosion that killed 29 coal workers — emerged from his incarceration unrepentant, and none the humbler.

On Tuesday, the former CEO of Massey Energy released an open letter to President Trump urging the administration to ignore any legislation that would strengthen punishments for mining company executives and supervisors who knowingly flout safety rules.

Full Story »

 
0
comments
Gardening

Gardening with Kids

Posted  May 19, 2017  by  Anonymous

Gardening with Kids can be fun!  Get them involved in planting seeds, flowers and a fruit and vegetable garden.  It’s so good for kids to get first hand experience with how to grow a garden! – – – – – Can you believe that it’s already time to start planting our gardens?  The start of gardening season sneaks up on me every year, and I think it’s because our transition from winter to spring is not very obvious.  One day it’s spring, the next day it’s winter.  Literally.  But then it happens, all of a sudden it’s May Long weekend, and suddenly we have permission to garden.  Oh the relief!  So I burn off to the garden centre with all the optimism a Canadian feels once winter is truly and finally behind them.  Because if the garden centre is ready and full of plants, it’s time right?!  Yes. So on a sunny and warm morning this week, I ventured off to our local PC® Garden Centre and filled my cart.  It was one of those trips where I told myself that I would only get a few things, but then left with a trunk full of plants…and maybe the front seat too.  But who’s counting?  😉 […]

The post Gardening with Kids appeared first on A Pretty Life In The Suburbs.

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

Mark Steyn remembers Roger Ailes

Posted  May 19, 2017  by  Kathy Shaidle

Mark Steyn writes: He learned a lot from those shows and then brought it to politics, treating his candidates as personalities whose events required creative production. The example he gave that day was from the Nixon campaign: The candidate was risk-averse and preferred the stump speech to go as planned. But Ailes knew his client […]

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

Julie Burchill: When real rock stars roamed the world

Posted  May 19, 2017  by  Kathy Shaidle

Julie Burchill writes: But of course the fall of the rock star is not all gloom and doom: it’s not awfully good for human beings to worship other human beings, either as love objects or love slaves. In such situations, it’s not even clear whether we were actually adoring another person or conducting a scenic-route […]

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

Meanwhile, a timely reminder that ROBERT SPENCER WAS NEARLY POISONED TO DEATH

Posted  May 19, 2017  by  Kathy Shaidle

“So yeah nukem & fuckem” said a friend in an email about this shit. I give zero fucks about you people losing your jobs because you dared to talk like a normal person for once. You are all — and yes, I KNOW THIS — closest conservatives. You are the elites Charles Murray (who is […]

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

“There’s a certain kind of personal essay that, for a long time, everybody seemed to hate”

Posted  May 19, 2017  by  Kathy Shaidle

These essays were mostly written by women. They came off as unseemly, the writer’s judgment as flawed. They were too personal: the topics seemed insignificant, or else too important to be aired for an audience of strangers. The essays that drew the most attention tended to fall within certain categories. There were the one-off body-horror […]

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

Schoolhouse Rock’s “I’m Just a Lie” (Thanks Jimmy Kimmel)

Posted  May 19, 2017  by  Yoni Freedhoff

For those of us old enough to remember, “I’m Just a Bill”, todays’ Funny Friday is sure to bring a smile. A sad one though.

Have a great weekend!

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

Some common errors you may encounter in Thunderbird

Posted  May 19, 2017  by  Anonymous

Mozilla’s Thunderbird is a popular desktop-based email client that offers a bundle of facilities like email, newsfeed, chat, newsgroup, etc. It is designed to manage multiple accounts, and is available for Windows, Linux, and OS X platforms, Moreover, it is free (Thunderbirds uses MBOX format, a free open source format, for storing its emails and … Continue reading Some common errors you may encounter in Thunderbird

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

Quirks Question of the Week

Posted  May 19, 2017  by  podcasting@cbc.ca

If the Sun is burning its fuel up, is it getting lighter, and will the Earth’s orbit change as a result?

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

Diving deep for glass sponges

Posted  May 19, 2017  by  podcasting@cbc.ca

A mission to explore a unique ecosystem off the B.C. coast.

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

NASA’s big rocket is going nowhere

Posted  May 19, 2017  by  podcasting@cbc.ca

NASA’s big new rocket, won’t make a first flight with astronauts, despite the Trump administration’s request.

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

The Puzzle of Pain

Posted  May 19, 2017  by  podcasting@cbc.ca

Pain is incredibly complex to understand and to treat.

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

The late birds are missing the worm

Posted  May 19, 2017  by  podcasting@cbc.ca

Climate change is shifting the times when songbirds should fly north.

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

Orangutans babies know breast is best

Posted  May 19, 2017  by  podcasting@cbc.ca

Orangutan teeth indicate a nursing period of eight or nine years.

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

Part 9: 150 Years of Canadian Aerospace History

Posted  May 18, 2017  by  Chuck Black

The Canada Centre for Remote Sensing, Synthetic Aperture Radar, 

SEASAT, John Macdonald and MDA

John MacDonald in 2008. Photo AM Jackson/Globe and Mail.

          By Robert Godwin

Canada’s aerospace raison d’être has always derived from its immense size, its location in the far north as a vast, barely-tracked wilderness of incalculable resources and the logical requirements relating to defence, communications, utilization and exploration which naturally follow from its size and location.


In 1966 the first really sophisticated earth observation satellite, called the Earth Resources Observation Satellite (EROS) had been announced by the US Geological Survey (USGS). The USGS sent a delegate to Ottawa where he was officially offered the use of the massive antenna in Prince Albert Saskatchewan which was no longer being used for ISIS or Alouette. In exchange for this valuable asset Canada would be allowed to read the downlink from EROS. However, EROS was cancelled due to some political machinations and replaced by NASA’s ERTS (later renamed Landsat).

It subsequently took until 1969 before NASA agreed to let Canada “read” data from ERTS. John Macdonald and his team at MDA convinced Morley and other key actors in the government that they could set up a ground station for a tenth of what the US was paying for similar facilities. They didn’t get the contract, but they did get to install what they called QuickLook; a system which generated an image from the ERTS data in minutes, while NASA’s best efforts took four days to get the full data stream converted. On the strength of this amazing achievement MDA was hired to provide a ground station at Shoe Cove, Newfoundland in time for the next generation of advanced remote sensing.

Two photo’s showing all that remains of Canada’s first satellite tracking station, in Shoe Cove, Newfoundland today, and how it looked in the late 1970’s. As outlined in the December 16th, 2015 Hidden Newfoundland post, “Satellite Tracking Station in Shoe Cove,” the station was one of twelve originally built under an international agreement created by the NASA in the early 1960’s. As outlined in the article, “this network of stations were part of the newly formed Satellite Tracking and Data Acquisition Network (STADAN). Based out of Goddard Space Flight Centre in Greenbelt, Maryland, STADAN was made up a number of sites that were located in places such as Alaska, Great Britain, Australia and Africa. Each site had the capabilities to track and acquire location data from a number of satellites that were orbiting the earth.” In 1977 a second facility, was constructed at this location by the CCRS to collect recorded data from three specific satellites; Landsat II, Landsat III, and a National Oceanographic and Atmosphere Administration (NOAA) monitor satellite. Photo’s c/o Hidden Newfoundland.

In February 1971 Morley had finally gained approval to establish a Federal remote sensing group which became known as the Canada Centre for Remote Sensing (CCRS). This group issued a string of reports including a revolutionary one by Phil Lapp entitled “Observables and Parameters of Remote Sensing.” In three dozen pages Lapp spelled out how remote sensing could be efficiently applied to daily life in Canada.

But remote sensing was still primarily a process carried out by aircraft. The Canadian Air Force had willingly offered up several aircraft, including CF-100 fighters and DC-3s, to be used for aerial remote sensing. It was important to test experimental sensors in aircraft before even contemplating the huge expense of sending them into space.

Around this time Kurt Stehling wrote an article in Space/Aeronautics magazine entitled “Spotting Pollution from Space.” In his usually adept way Stehling spelled out the problem in plain language:

The answer lies in larger aircraft, capable of flying at higher altitudes, or…in spacecraft complemented by aircraft. For not only would aircraft supplement satellite observations and aid in photo interpretation—always a difficult problem—but they would be used whenever clouds obscured the earth’s surface or whenever sudden, highly localized pollution required immediate observation. In addition, they would serve as flying test beds in the development of new and improved spacecraft sensors.

The payload capacity of the planes available to Morley through normal channels was insufficient and so through some hard bargaining CCRS purchased a Convair 580. This purchase then opened the door to some cross-border cooperation.

The technique which was about to change everything was synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and if deployed on-board a satellite it promised to completely revolutionize the art of map-making and resource prospecting. It would overcome all of the issues with simple microwave radar in space which Stehling had outlined years earlier. Most importantly it would allow the government to understand the true geophysical and geopolitical nature of the under-populated and vast country named Canada. A company in Michigan which had been involved in early development of the technology owned an SAR system but they didn’t have an aircraft large enough to use it. They made a deal with the CCRS to share their resources.

By this time Stehling had moved over to the American National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). He had now fully refined his original idea from 1953 and through his role advising Vice President Hubert Humphrey he had proposed putting SAR on a science satellite and using it to map the world’s oceans and coastlines. If this could be accomplished the whole problem of using only aircraft to monitor Canada’s remote coastlines would be solved. This would have repercussions across all aspects of Canadian aerospace including the huge problem of which aircraft the country needed for defence. The first SAR science satellite was to be called Seasat and it would carry all of the instruments Stehling had proposed in 1968.

Meanwhile, since the early moon landings had been so successful, it was time to do some science aboard more sophisticated versions of Apollo, and that meant not wasting a single opportunity. The same kind of data that Phil Lapp had been seeking 20 years earlier while flying over northern Ontario was now going to be gathered from lunar orbit.

 The Lunar Mapping and Panoramic Cameras were mounted in the forward portion of the Apollo Scientific Instrument Module (SIM) in bay 1 of the Service Module on Apollo ‘J’ missions on Apollo 15 to 17. Graphic c/o Apollo Flight Journal

The so-called “J” Missions would include an experiments payload bay in the Apollo Service Module.

At the very base of this bay two STEM were installed; one to carry a Gamma-Ray Spectrometer and the other for a Mass Spectrometer. Each would be extended more than 20 feet out into space and the data they would record would be synchronized with a panoramic camera, a mapping camera and a laser altimeter. The resulting data would forever alter our understanding of the moon.

In 1971, while the first J Mission was flying over the lunar surface, MDA was given its first contract to install electronics at the space ground station in Prince Albert Saskatchewan. The Prince Albert Facility had originally been set up in 1959 as a joint project of the United States and Canada. The 84 foot diameter radar dish had been installed because it was believed that the aurora could mask the approach of incoming warheads. It was also believed that the aurora could interfere with communications with any ABM system.

The location of the $10Mln CDN facility about 15km west of Prince Albert had been a boon for the district, which perhaps not entirely coincidentally happened to be the home riding of then Prime Minister Diefenbaker.

When MDA were invited to install their first system it was to coincide with the data coming down from the first ERTS (Landsat) satellite. Prince Albert had evolved from an experimental ABM facility to a satellite down-link, and was now to become an integral part of Canada’s resource monitoring.

Robert Godwin.
_____________________________________________________________

Robert Godwin is the owner and founder of Apogee Space Books, the Space Curator at the Canadian Air & Space Museum and an American Astronautical Society History Committee Member.

He has written or edited over 100 books including the award winning series “The NASA Mission Reports” and appeared on dozens of radio and television programs in Canada, the USA and England as an expert not only on space exploration but also on music.  

His books have been discussed on CNN, the CBC, the BBC and CBS 60 Minutes. He produced the first ever virtual reality panoramas of the Apollo lunar surface photography and the first multi-camera angle movie of the Apollo 11 moonwalk. His latest book was written with the late Frederick I Ordway III and is called “2001 The Heritage and Legacy of the Space Odyssey” about the history of spaceflight at the movies.

Last Week, “Stehling, Maynard, the Lunar Excursion Module, Gerald Bull, James Chamberlin & Phil Lapp,'” in part eight of “150 Years of Canadian Aerospace History.

Next Week, “MDA’s Rise, Spar’s Fall, STEM Antenna’s, the Space Shuttle, the Canadarm, 
COMDEV & Optech,” as part ten of “150 Years of Canadian Aerospace History” continues.

On sale now, at Apogee Books.

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

Surprising Our Kids with a Springfree Trampoline! And How To Win One of Your Own!

Posted  May 18, 2017  by  Anonymous

Disclosure:  I am working with Springfree Trampoline as a brand ambassador, and I am excited to share my experiences with you!  As part of this partnership, I have been compensated, but as always, all pictures, views and opinions are my own.  We reaaaaally LOVE our new trampoline!  I even jump on it…shhhh don’t tell anyone.  😉  Trampolines have been a HUGE part of life over here…my parents bought a trampoline for my sister and I when we were very young and we jumped on it until I moved out to go to university.  True story.  I remember getting up really early in the morning and using the trampoline as a way to exercise.  I have always loved trampolines.  So as soon as our kids were old enough to jump on trampolines we bought one for our backyard.  Even at that time, which was over 10 years ago, trampolines had come a long way from the ones we had as kids.  There were nets and pads so we were good to go, haha!  But it didn’t take long for the nets to disintegrate and the pads fall apart.  In no time we were left with quite a rusty trampoline skeleton.  See below… […]

The post Surprising Our Kids with a Springfree Trampoline! And How To Win One of Your Own! appeared first on A Pretty Life In The Suburbs.

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

Deadlift Grip Considerations

Posted  May 18, 2017  by  deansomerset

Everyone loves a good deadlift. Your grandma phones on Sundays to ask how your deadlift is progressing. Your dog/cat cuddles up to you harder if you have a solid pull that day. They can sense it. And really, who doesn’t want to make grandma and your pets proud of you on a daily basis? Psychopaths.…… Read More

The post Deadlift Grip Considerations appeared first on DeanSomerset.com.

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

Mark Steyn: The Poisoning of Robert Spencer

Posted  May 18, 2017  by  Kathy Shaidle

Mark Steyn writes: For those in Robert Spencer’s line of work, these events are undeniably stressful. There are security precautions, of course, but you never know, from the Vilks event in Copenhagen to Robert’s in Garland, Texas, whether some jihadist will succeed in breaking through. There’s a sense of relief when you exit the stage […]

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

Dark Corners: “Blood Orgy of the She Devils” (1973)

Posted  May 18, 2017  by  Kathy Shaidle
Dark Corners: “Blood Orgy of the She Devils” (1973)

More from my siteDark Corners: ‘Invasion of the Bee Girls’ (1973)Dark Corners: ‘Flesh For Frankenstein’ (1973)Dark Corners: ‘Devil Girl From Mars’ (1954)Dark Corners tackles ‘Race With the Devil’ (1975)

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

Justin Trudeau makes remarks to supporters in Vancouver

Posted  May 18, 2017  by  Liberal Party of Canada

Justin Trudeau, Leader of the Liberal Party of Canada, will deliver remarks to supporters at a Liberal fundraising event in Vancouver on May 18th, 2017.

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

Gavin McInnes: Urinating on the Taliban — Where Are They Now?

Posted  May 18, 2017  by  Kathy Shaidle
Gavin McInnes: Urinating on the Taliban — Where Are They Now?

Gavin McInnes writes: Justin Ropke is dead. He was an Afghanistan war vet who got addicted to heroin and—like pretty much everyone who enjoys that drug—he OD’d. I know of him because he was allegedly involved in the “urinating on the Taliban” incident from five years ago, and I think his death is a good […]

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

Massachusetts Let Spectra Energy Secretly Edit its Pollution Permit in Atlantic Bridge Gas Project

Posted  May 18, 2017  by  Anonymous
Open house poster showing a Spectra Energy map of its Atlantic Bridge and other pipeline projects

Massachusetts environmental officials allowed Spectra Energy to quietly review and edit a draft approval of an air pollution permit the state plans to grant the company for its Atlantic Bridge gas project. 

According to emails obtained by DeSmog through an open records request, this privilege of reviewing and editing the draft approval was granted exclusively to Spectra and not to the general public.   

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

David Cole: “I’ve always believed it’s racism that’s the last refuge of a scoundrel”

Posted  May 18, 2017  by  Kathy Shaidle
David Cole: “I’ve always believed it’s racism that’s the last refuge of a scoundrel”

David Cole writes: Jogging, jogging paths, cycling, bike lanes, not running over cyclists, hiking, the ethical treatment of animals, food appreciation, veganism, health food, herbal tea, nutritional guidelines, vitamins for health, solar power, legalized weed. All racist, because they’re the product of white culture and “privilege.” See the problem, though? These are all things that […]

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

Famous Canadian Ice Road Melts for the Last Time

Posted  May 17, 2017  by  Anonymous
Northwest Territories Inuvik to Tuktoyaktuk Ice Road, Matt Jacques|DeSmog Canada

Each winter in Canada’s far north, a series of ice roads take form, providing people and supply trucks temporary access to the region’s otherwise isolated towns. But rapid changes to Canada’s north means this spring marks the final melt of one of the north’s famed ice highways, the ‘Road to the Top of the World,’ stretching across 187 kilometres of frozen Mackenzie Delta and Arctic Ocean in the Northwest Territories, linking Inuvik to Tuktoyaktuk.

It’s taking longer for everything to freeze up, and the ice isn’t as thick,” Wally Schumann, the minister of infrastructure for the Northwest Territories, told the New York Times in April. The Northwest Territories is warming at four to five times the global rate.

Under construction right now is a new permanent $300-million all-weather road — but its long-term stability is also challenged by the unpredictable, warming landscape says Phil Marsh, professor and Canada Research Chair in Cold Regions Water Science at Wilfred Laurier University.

This area is continuous permafrost with massive amounts of ground ice,” Marsh explained.

In the spring, melting water can carve sizeable channels through the ground ice, “which can rapidly drain a lake in less than twenty four hours.”

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

Trump Admin Proposes 70% Cut To Renewable Energy And Efficiency Programs at Energy Dept

Posted  May 17, 2017  by  Farron Cousins

According to Axios.com, the Trump Administration is proposing a 70% reduction in funding for the Department of Energy’s renewable and energy efficiency programs, a move that could severely dampen the recent surge in renewable energy production and job growth.

As Axios points out, a cut this steep will have trouble making its way through Congress, but it sets the bar incredibly low from a negotiation standpoint, meaning that the overall funding for the department will still fall significantly from previous years. Funding for the renewable energy programs dropped from $478 million in 2015 to $451 million in 2016, while energy efficiency programs increased from $721 million to $762 million in the same period.

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

Pennsylvania School Now Doing Emergency Drills in Case of Pipeline Explosion

Posted  May 17, 2017  by  Sharon Kelly
Gas pipeline warning sign

At the Glenwood Elementary School in Media, Pennsylvania, roughly 450 students interrupted their regular schedules one day this month for an unusual emergency drill.

Just after 1:30 p.m. on May 3, the entire student body practiced sheltering in place in the school’s gymnasium, then prepared to evacuate the campus by bus, under the watchful eye of the school’s superintendent, state police, and local first responders.

Everyone took this seriously and it was reflected in how quickly they moved through the drill — two minutes to be sheltered in place and three minutes to be completely evacuated from the building,” Principal Eric Bucci told local reporters.

It wasn’t fears of natural disaster or terror attack that prompted the emergency drill. Instead, worries about a fossil fuel pipeline construction project nearby left the school district drafting emergency response plans and practicing safety protocols.

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

Fajita Chicken Sheet Pan Dinner

Posted  May 17, 2017  by  Anonymous

Make this Fajita Chicken Sheet Pan Dinner in less than 1 hour!  One dish means dinner prep and clean up is easier than ever!  Serve with all your favourite fajita toppings! – – – – – – This is such a fun way to serve a fajita dinner without all of the work!  Just line a pan with chicken, peppers and onions then season generously with taco seasoning, and you’ve got a Fajita Chicken Sheet Pan Dinner…so easy and delicious. This time of year we are SO busy…I mean really, who isn’t?  Soccer, baseball, rugby…whichever sport you family is involved in, is in full force right now.  We have kids in sports 4 days out of the week right now, so for me, menu planning is at the upmost of importance.  And not only meal planning, but quick and healthy ideas.  I need dinner ready in less than one hour, and I need it to be healthy. That’s why I love sheet pan dinners so much.  You can add so many fresh and delicious ingredients to a pan, and have it all ready in less than an hour.  So during the time it takes for dinner to cook, I have time to […]

The post Fajita Chicken Sheet Pan Dinner appeared first on A Pretty Life In The Suburbs.

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

Watch It Again! “Psycho” (Alfred Hitchcock, 1960)

Posted  May 17, 2017  by  Kathy Shaidle
Watch It Again! “Psycho” (Alfred Hitchcock, 1960)

Via BrightLightsFilm: What’s more, the money goes down with her into the swamp and with it, all that we had held as important in the intrigue, all of our expectations for a resolution. Suddenly, the typical Hitchcock protagonist’s plea for a romantic ending becomes, not just in Psycho but for all of his films, its […]

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

Mark Steyn: “‘We’re not allowed to talk about this,’ as Sullivan says”

Posted  May 17, 2017  by  Kathy Shaidle

Mark Steyn writes: As Jorge Ramos lectured Tucker Carlson on Fox the other night, Carlson has no standing to object to illegal immigrants because they turn down the bed in his hotel room. When they’re serving you your Egg McMuffin, none dare call it treason. As for Sullivan’s statement that “this is going to be […]

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

I’d never read this book, but the review is good

Posted  May 17, 2017  by  Kathy Shaidle

There is just way too much Driving in Cars with Boys sluttiness in the actual book, but this review gets to something important: Life is lived forward, but can only be understood backward, said Kierkegaard. To put it another way, midlife reckonings revise the events of the past to make the present comprehensible. But Dederer, […]

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

Guest Post: Public Health RD Questions Ontario’s Calorie Labelling Rollout

Posted  May 17, 2017  by  Yoni Freedhoff

Last week an RD who’d prefer to remain anonymous asked me if they could share their thoughts on Ontario’s new calorie labelling initiative with my readers. I readily agreed, and I agree with much of this post. I’m strongly supportive of calorie labelling, but the rollout certainly could have been more thoughtful. And while I agree with all of this RD’s closing points, I don’t see calorie labelling vs. other changes as being either or – I’d like to see them all.

On January 1st of this year it became mandatory for restaurants with at least 20 locations in Ontario to post the calories on their menus. Many dietitians and other healthcare professionals rejoiced as this information would help people to make better, or at least more informed choices when eating out. Personally, I was a little more skeptical. From what I had seen from other places implementing similar legislation resulted in little if any change in eating habits. We are always talking about evidence-informed decision making in healthcare, yet this legislation from the Ministry of Health and Long-term Care seemed to be based more on appearances than on evidence.

There were problems from the start. Training for public health inspectors (who are responsible for enforcing the legislation) didn’t take place until just over a month before the legislation took effect. It was made very clear to the PHIs that they were to only ensure that eating establishments adhere to the legislation; i.e. that calories were posted in the appropriate places in large enough font and that the contextual statement was posted. They were not to question the calorie counts posted. Some of you might remember the time everyone got upset about Chipotles posting the calories for just the chorizo in a wrap, rather than for the entire wrap. Well, if something like this were to happen in Ontario, unless a complaint came from the public, the PHIs have no recourse. They might see calories posted that seem blatantly incorrect but they have been instructed not to question them. Restaurant owners and operators need only use means that they “reasonably believe” to determine the calorie counts. That means that calorie counts could be determined by a bomb calorimeter (accurate) or by myfitnesspal (questionable) as long as the owner believes it to be accurate. The Ministry declined to provide PHIs with any guidance as to what methods and tools would be appropriate so they are left to take restaurant owners at their word.

Framing this as an initiative to decrease childhood obesity was a huge mistake in my mind. Teaching children to calorie count is not healthy or helpful. Nor is simply providing calorie amounts to parents when caloric needs vary so much among children. Sometimes providing just a little information can be dangerous. I’m sure that the government meant well and they thought this would be a great visible way to show that they’re tackling childhood obesity while downloading the cost onto restaurant owners, win-win. However, this legislation should have been targeted toward adults only. Children should never be counting calories.

The point of this legislation is ostensibly to help the public make informed choices. To that end, you would think that there would have been a public education campaign launched well in advance of the implementation of the legislation. You would be wrong. Despite numerous requests from public health dietitians, and assurances that public education was coming, it wasn’t until over a month after the legislation came into effect that any “education” was undertaken. As a dietitian, I was expecting information on how to use the newly available calorie postings to make better choices. Boy was I wrong. Instead, the Ministry released a series of ads that read more like fast food advertisements and essentially just say “calories are now on menus”.

Let’s fill our kids with ideas about eating right.

A post shared by Ontario Government (@ongov) on Mar 8, 2017 at 11:36am PST

I see these and I think, “wow! Poutine and hash browns are so low in calories. They’re not as bad a choice as I thought.” Not at all the message that I think should be coming through this campaign. It’s embarrassing that the government used our tax dollars to pay people to come up with these terrible ads. Apparently they focus group tested them and the teens thought they were hilarious. Perhaps they can’t tell the difference between laughing with you and laughing at you? Regardless, there should have been someone working on this campaign who saw that it wasn’t sending the intended message (check out the comments). They should also realize that simply telling people that calories are posted on menus isn’t sufficient to aid them in appropriately using this information. As it stands, it only serves to help those who are already health conscious and who know roughly how many calories per day they should be consuming. They should have been giving people the information and tools to better understand and use the calorie counts.

Does putting calories on menus even work? There was a recent webinar by Health Evidence on this and they said that on average, it led to reductions of about 70 calories per day. Which sounds great except that the average caloric intake of people in the studies was about 3000 calories a day, about 1000 calories more than the recommended daily calories for an average adult. So, yes, putting calories on menus may lead some people to choose items with fewer calories but if they’re still consuming about 900 more calories than they need I’m not sure that’s anything to write home about.

Calories are only one piece of information and I worry about putting too much emphasis on it. Restaurant meals tend to be obscenely high in sodium but the calories won’t tell us anything about this. Calories also don’t tell us if a menu item is nutrient dense or nutrient void. It can make it appear that deep-fried foods are equal to salads.

Something else to consider, beyond the concerns I mentioned above about the accuracy of the methods used to determine the calorie counts, is the human factor. Even if the calories are accurately measured, that’s based on the sample as provided by the restaurant which you can bet is going to put that food in the best light possible. Do you really think that line cooks in a restaurant, or teenagers at Five Guys are concerned about portioning things so that meals contain the same number of calories as is posted on the menus? I doubt it. they’re probably using more oil on that stir-fry or scooping extra fries onto that plate. It’s pretty safe to assume that the actual number of calories in any given menu item is going to be higher than the number posted on the menu so take the number on the menu with a grain of salt.

I’m sure that there are people reading this thinking “but at least they’re doing something. What would you do?” I would bring back mandatory home ec in schools. I would help to ensure better access to and affordability of nutritious foods across the province. I would provide more support and funding for healthy eating and food literacy initiatives for all ages. Instead of accepting that people are going to eat out regularly, and assuming that providing calories on menus is going to make people healthier, we should be encouraging people to get in the kitchen.

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

Monarchism’s last gasp as protest against decline of old WASP hegemony in Canada (and Australia etc)

Posted  May 17, 2017  by  Randall White

WEDNESDAY, MAY 17, 2017. Toronto, Ontario.  This coming Monday we will celebrate locally what is known here in Ontario (and other Canadian provinces) as Victoria Day.  (In Quebec the same holiday is now more sensibly called  Journée nationale des patriotes.) The holiday is nowadays defined as “the last Monday preceding May 25.” And this entrenches […]

Full Story »