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Buddy Mercury Sings His Ode To Post November 8th, 2016 America

Posted  April 21, 2017  by  Yoni Freedhoff

And I have to say, I’m right there with today’s Funny Friday’s Buddy.

Have a great weekend

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Jane Goodall activist

Posted  April 21, 2017  by  podcasting@cbc.ca

Jane Goodall talks about her decision to embrace activism.

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Global perspective climate change panel

Posted  April 21, 2017  by  podcasting@cbc.ca

Perspective on climate change from the United States, China and Indian in a panel discussion

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Space Advisory Committee Members Announced: Stakeholders Begin Independently Releasing Their Own Views, Just in Case

Posted  April 20, 2017  by  Chuck Black
          By Chuck Black

With almost no fanfare in either the mainstream media or amongst the Federal government, but with a great deal of confusion from the Ministry of Innovation, Science and Economic Development (ISED), the Federal government department tasked with administering its activities. the members of the long awaited space advisory board were finally announced on Tuesday evening.

Industry minister James Moore at the 2014 Canadian Aerospace Summit and his successor, innovation minister NavDeep Bains at the 2016 edition of the same event. As outlined in the November 19th, 2014 post, “Industry Minister Moore Announces Space Advisory Board Members,” the membership of the space advisory board was long-awaited even in 2014, when Moore appointed Colonel Chris Hadfield, retired general and former CSA president Walt Natynczyk and others to the original committee. However, the 2014 board never issued a report and so the search for a new board was announced by innovation minister Bains in November 2016 at the 2016 Aerospace Summit. The creation of a space advisory board was one of the recommendations of the November 2012 Federal Review of Aerospace and Space Programs and Policies (or “Emerson Report“) which was presented to another industry minister, Christian Paradis, in November 2012. Photo’s c/o Chuck Black & Brian Orlotti.
As outlined in the April 18th, 2017 Government of Canada news release, “Government of Canada renews Space Advisory Board,” the new board, chaired by Dr. Marie Lucy Stojak, the Director of the Summer School on Management of Creativity in an Innovation Society at HEC Montréal, will:

… engage with Canadians to develop a new vision for Canada’s space sector and define key elements of a strategy that will be launched this summer. The advisory board’s input will inform the strategy, which will focus on using space to drive broader economic growth and innovation, while inspiring the next generation of space scientists.

The other committee members include:

A reminder that one of the real issues currently preoccupying  the Canadian government is whether it should continue  supporting at least one Canadian based contractor capable of building large, multi-function Canadian military satellites like RADARSAT-2 and the upcoming RADARSAT Constellation or open future competition to lower cost, international bids. The March 29th, 2017 SatCom Frontier post, “Commercial Space Operators to Canada; ‘We’re Here and We can Help,'” argues that large, international satellite providers like Intelsat General Corporation are able to assist with complex military programs like the proposed Enhanced Satellite Communication Project (ESCP). For a contrary view on this issue, its worth taking a look at the April 9th, 2017 post, “Part 4: A History of the Canadian Space Program – Policies & Lessons Learned Coping with Modest Budgets,” which focused on “the 1970’s, “Equal Access” to Communications, “Improved Industrial Capability” and the Hermes Communication Satellite” and was even co-written by one of the new members of the current space advisory board. Graphic c/o Intelsat General Corporation.

The new members replace others appointed by the previous government to the same board in 2014. That board never issued a public report or held any public meetings.
The new board is expected to engage in a process similar to the methodology employed during the “massive” review of Federal science funding which wound up last week.

As outlined in the April 17th, 2017 post, “‘Massive‘ Review of Federal Science Funding Finally Released; Will Likely Soon ‘Drop Down the Memory Hole,’” that review seems to have achieved less than stellar results and might not be a good model to emulate.

The only real surprise expected to come out of this review (and how’s that for irony) could be an acknowledgement that foreign companies like Airbus and Intelsat General Corporation might soon be able to bid on large Canadian space projects.

This is especially likely given the inclusion of Pley and Tovee on the board, although the debate on this particular issue originated in the early days of Canada’s space efforts.

Some organizations are willing to lobby the Federal government even without the bully pulpit provided by the space advisory board. An example would by the 8th Joint Planetary and Terrestrial Mining Sciences Symposium (PTMSS) and Space Resources Roundtable, which will be held in conjunction with the 2017 Canadian Institute of Mining (CIM) Convention in Montreal, PQ and promises “major announcements” from international space mining companies. Event organizers, such as Deltion Innovations CEO Dale Boucher have long advocated the use of tax credit system currently used in the mining, to grow the Canadian space industry. Boucher was last profiled in the April 10th, 2016 post, “Deltion Innovations Receives Gov’t Funding to Develop Multi-Tool for Space Mining; Will Anyone Buy It?” For more on the mining industry and how it could drive space exploration, check out the July 30th, 2012 CSCA submission to the Aerospace Review, “Using Tools from the Mining Industry to Spur Innovation and Grow the Canadian Space Industry.” Graphic c/o Deltion Innovations.

Besides, as recently as a few years ago, Canada had two domestic firms capable of building large satellites.

However, as outlined most recently in the April 19th, 2017 post, “American MDA Subsidiary Promotes “DEXTRE” for US as NASA RESTORE-L Satellite Servicing Budget Slashed,” Richmond, BC based MacDonald Dettwiler (MDA) is currently hunting US government and Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) contracts, which subjects the company to many of the same US export licencing regulations that delayed the launch of RADARSAT-2 for almost seven years, and currently causes concern among those responsible for developing Canadian policies relating to northern sovereignty.

Also, in February 2016, common shares of Cambridge, Ontario based COM DEV International were de-listed from the Toronto Stock Exchange (TSX) as the iconic Canadian company finished up its final task of becoming a subsidiary of US conglomerate Honeywell.

However, nothing is ever certain in politics or in political committees. Board member Evans has often argued publicly for a policy of “capacity building” which would favor specific Canadian companies with additional funds and tax benefits to allow them to compete with large foreign multinational competitors, who typically also receive subsidiaries from their national governments.

Evans argues that the creation of a domestic space industry outweighs the up-front costs associated with “capacity building,” and supports the growth of domestic expertise and industry.

The Canadian Senate isn’t waiting for the space advisory committee to issue a report when it can issue its own. As outlined in the April 19th, 2017 Space News post, “Report: Canada should work with U.S. to protect satellites as “critical infrastructure,” a report from the Senate’s Standing Committee on National Security and Defence and Security advocates the designation of “satellites and radar installations as critical infrastructure and seek ways to secure the full spectrum of all critical infrastructure assets against significant threats, including electromagnetic pulse, by 2020 in partnership with the United States and other countries.” The article notes that the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) has long been advocating this approach. Screenshot c/o Space News.

Support for the new space advisory board, at least among the Federal government departments likely to be the most affected by any final report, seems tentative at best.

For example, the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) is in the midst of a series of announcements related to the development of technologies they expect to utilize over the coming years and have been doing this without any guidance from the space advisory board.

As outlined most recently in the April 3rd, 2017 post, “The Canadian Space Agency is “Very” Cautious About Its Post ISS Role,” and the April 19th, 2017 More Space News post, “The Canadian Space Agency has just announced 15 more “priority technologies” it wants to develop,” the CSA already has a strong, if also strongly conservative, sense of where it wants to go over the next decade.

There is also some question about whether the Department of National Defense (DND) is on-board with the new board.

As outlined in the April 17th, 2017 post, “An Update on NS Rockets, Intelsat Hunting for Canadian Gov’t Satellite Contracts & More Ukrainian Lybid News,” DND is pushing its own military space program, the proposed Enhanced Satellite Communication Project (ESCP), and the new project is likely out of the scope of the space advisory board mandate.

Professor Ram Jakhu, the associate director of the Centre for Research of Air and Space Law at McGill University, was one of two authors of the February 17th, 2017 “Independent Review of the Remote Sensing Space Systems Act.” The report makes a number of recommendations directly relevant to the mandate of the new space advisory board but there was no plans from the Federal government to release the report for public comment. Fortunately, and as outlined in the April 20th, 2017 SpaceQ post, “Exclusive: A Review of Canada’s Remote Sensing Law Recommends Creating a New General Outer Space Act,” that review is now open to public perusal. The report and other issues relating to it, will be the topics of discussion when Jakhu and the Centre hold the 5th Annual Manfred Lachs International Conference on Global Space Governance, which will be held in Montreal, PQ from May 5th – 6th. Hopefully, someone from the space advisory board will also be there. Photo c/o McGill University.

It’s also worth noting that, while the space advisory board members are expecting to hold a series of town halls across the country to solicit feedback and assist with the development of useful policy, the secretariat supporting the space advisory board has so far refused to confirm or deny any activities the committee could possibly be conducting, except for one meeting taking place in Ottawa on Friday, April, 21st.

Here’s hoping that they organize a few more meetings after that first one. There’s a lot of data to collect and some actual activities culminating in a proper, publicly available report would certainly be an improvement over the last time.

Chuck Black.
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Chuck Black is the editor of the Commercial Space blog.

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On Ann Coulter And Free Speech: She Ain’t Always Been For It

Posted  April 20, 2017  by  bigcitylib

From 2005:”They’re always accusing us of repressing their speech,” she said. “I say let’s do it. Let’s repress them.”She later added, “Frankly, I’m not a big fan of the First Amendment.”Read through the link.  There’s more there.  Worth notin…

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New Lawsuit Filed in Next Chapter of Dimock, Pennsylvania, Fracking Water Pollution Saga

Posted  April 20, 2017  by  Steve Horn
Ray Kemble

On April 12, Dimock, Pennsylvania resident Ray Kemble filed a nuisance and negligence lawsuit against Marcellus Shale drilling company Cabot Oil and Gas for alleged contamination of his groundwater and air. Kemble lives around the corner from the embattled Carter Road, where his neighbors have been struggling for years with a similar water pollution suit against Cabot.

Filed in U.S. District Court, Kemble’s case is somewhat of a companion to the civil lawsuit brought by the Ely and Hubert families living on Carter Road. Their case began in 2009 and in March 2016, a jury awarded them a $4.24 million unanimous verdict for damages. However, the judge in their case recently overturned the verdict amid an ongoing dispute over the legality of evidence the families’ attorney referenced during the trial.

Kemble, who has lived in his home since 1992, said in his complaint that he noticed “a change in his drinking water, including but not limited to discoloration and sediment build up” soon after Cabot began drilling near his property in 2008.

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We’re off to bear-flag republic, to study the natives after 3 months of puzzling and mercurial new president

Posted  April 20, 2017  by  Counterweights Editors

This coming Saturday morning the entire staff here (except for Dominic Berry, who has a big date with his current squeeze at a local sporting event) will be boarding an airplane at YYZ, bound for our regular seminar with technical support staff currently residing in the land of the Golden State Warriors. (They are now, […]

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Contractor Erases Suspicious Ties as FERC Denies Conflict in Atlantic Coast Pipeline Review

Posted  April 20, 2017  by  Anonymous
FERC headquarters building

A contractor assisting the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) in its review of the proposed Atlantic Coast pipeline has removed mention of its link to the project’s main contractor from its website. The move came after DeSmog reported on the links between the two contractors.

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Ottawa Police intimidate abortion clinic [updated]

Posted  April 20, 2017  by  Dr.Dawg

A recent column by the Toronto Star’s Heather Mallick indicates that the pro-choice struggle is far from over. It’s not the law getting in the way at this point, although in New Brunswick that has been the case until recently,…

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(VIDEO) Camille Paglia: Trump Already Headed Towards Reelection, Democrats Have Overplayed Their Hand

Posted  April 20, 2017  by  Kathy Shaidle

Via RealClearPolitics. More from my site‘The woman is a disaster!’: Camille Paglia on Hillary ClintonGavin McInnes: A Future Letter From a Socialist to President TrumpJim Goad: An Evil Virus Called PopulismNaomi Klein isn’t 100% wrong, but there’s an accidental punchline

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Reminder: School shootings started in Canada, not Columbine. And schools are the problem, not guns.

Posted  April 20, 2017  by  Kathy Shaidle
Reminder: School shootings started in Canada, not Columbine. And schools are the problem, not guns.

As I was saying: You won’t hear this from Michael Moore, but modern school shootings are a Canadian invention, too, and I don’t just mean 1989’s “Montreal Massacre.” Despite the absence of a so-called “gun culture,” we spawned the first Adam Lanzas back in the mid-1970s, getting a twenty-plus-year head start on Columbine. Don’t be […]

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Four Good Reasons to March for Science this Weekend (and One Bad Reason for Going)

Posted  April 20, 2017  by  guest
Scientists march

On Saturday, thousands of people in over 500 hundred marches will take to the streets to call for governments to support and fund scientific enquiry. Dr Alice Bell — campaigner, writer and researcher in the public engagement with science and technology — outlines why it’s important for people to support the global March for Science.

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I could watch Corman’s “The Wasp Woman” (1959) every day. Now it’s on Blu-Ray.

Posted  April 20, 2017  by  Kathy Shaidle
I could watch Corman’s “The Wasp Woman” (1959) every day. Now it’s on Blu-Ray.

Once again we see that, in the tradition of Carrie, Repulsion, The Brain That Wouldn’t Die and Rosemary’s Baby, men make the best “feminist” art: First up is THE WASP WOMAN, a Corman-directed/Leo Gordon-scripted effort presumably inspired by the-then success of THE FLY. Susan Cabot (WAR OF THE SATELLITES) stars as Janice Starlin, the 40-something owner […]

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Gavin McInnes: Proud Boys Declare Victory in Berkeley

Posted  April 20, 2017  by  Kathy Shaidle

Gavin McInnes writes: After we were disarmed, the police must have had orders to stand down because they completely vanished. Soon after, the protesters surrounded the event and formed a moat of human filth around us so we could not get out. The speeches went on despite M-80s and rocks being thrown at the crowd. […]

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“Some of the best GOP stumbles in recent memory have involved (…) Hitler or rape”

Posted  April 20, 2017  by  Kathy Shaidle
“Some of the best GOP stumbles in recent memory have involved (…) Hitler or rape”

David Cole writes: But here’s the thing: With most incoherent GOPs, there is, at least, an underlying set of ideological principles behind the gaffes and solecisms. With someone like Sarah Palin, for example, we had a pretty good idea what her beliefs were, so when she’d serve up another plate of shredded word salad, we’d still […]

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Are you a Millennial? Consider living in one of these four Canadian cities

Posted  April 20, 2017  by  Anonymous

Vancouver

Are you a Canadian between the ages of 20 and 36 and therefore a member of the so-called Millennial generation? If so, then you might be happiest calling Vancouver, Montreal, Toronto or Ottawa home, at least according to a new ranking of the best cities in the world for young people to live. 

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For Beginners, Maybe Cooking Shouldn’t Be “Healthy”

Posted  April 20, 2017  by  Yoni Freedhoff
Serious Eats’ 3 Ingredient Stovetop Mac & Cheese

Having worked with literally thousands of patients on improving the quality of their diets I can tell you that the most common barrier I hear to their adoption of more regular home cooked meals is a real or perceived lack of skill or talent at it.

Sometimes their beliefs stem from personal experiences and experiments. Other times they come from one or more family members who have complained about a particular dish (rather than be thankful that someone took the time to cook for them).

I can also tell you that many of the folks who don’t cook regularly believe that if they were to start doing so, they’d need to be cooking “healthy” foods.

Why sure, cooking especially healthy meals is a nice aspiration, but if you’re a beginner in the kitchen, why not instead focus on cooking meals that while perhaps not incredibly healthy, are meals that you’re confident that you or your family will enjoy?

The goal really is to gain comfort in the kitchen and/or to gain the trust of your family members that you can cook yummy things.

So if you’re a beginner in the kitchen, maybe cutting your cooking teeth on less healthy meals will encourage you to gain the skills and comfort you’ll need to slowly improve your repertoire, and in so doing make the kitchen a room in which you actually enjoy spending time.

        
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Bill Nye on Marching for Science: ‘Science is political!’

Posted  April 20, 2017  by  podcasting@cbc.ca

Bill Nye says the thing to keep in mind when it comes to climate change is that ‘we’re all in this together.’

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On Keeping Ms. Wynne As OLP Leader

Posted  April 19, 2017  by  bigcitylib

This is from an email from Ontario Proud, who may be a PCPO front group:And it’s true.  I cannot see a party led by some coup leader doing better than the current leader. As for recent polls, McGuinty was down 15% back in 2011, which is similar to…

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Dominion Bets Big on Establishment Candidates Northam, Gillespie in Virginia Governor’s Race

Posted  April 19, 2017  by  guest

This is a guest post by David Pomerantz, crossposted from Energy and Policy Institute

Virginia’s monopoly electric utility, Dominion Energy, has thrown its chips behind two establishment candidates for governor, Democrat Ralph Northam and Republican Ed Gillespie, in hopes that they can fend off populist primary opponents in both parties who have turned the utility into a campaign punching bag.

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One Community’s Fight for Clean Air in Louisiana’s Cancer Alley

Posted  April 19, 2017  by  Julie Dermansky
Denka's chloroprene plant in Louisiana

It doesn’t take carefully calibrated measurements to realize there is something wrong with the air around the Denka Performance Elastomer plant in St. John the Baptist Parish, Louisiana. 

From a small plane, I photographed the petrochemical manufacturing facility, until recently owned by DuPont, noting its proximity to the community around its fence line. The emissions were horrible. Breathing them while circling the plant twice left me with a headache that lingered for hours.

The surrounding communities and I were inhaling emissions of chloroprene and 28 other chemicals, which the plant uses to make the synthetic rubber commonly known as Neoprene.

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Fossil Fuel Industry Steps in to Help Save Paris Climate Deal for All the Wrong Reasons

Posted  April 19, 2017  by  Farron Cousins
Money clenched in a person's hand

In May of 2016, six months before the U.S. presidential election, then-candidate Donald Trump said that he would “cancel” the United States’ involvement in the Paris climate accord. Immediately following his election, however, Trump appeared to back-track slightly, saying he had “an open mind” about the agreement. And just this week, his administration canceled a much-hyped meeting to discuss the deal’s future in the U.S.

The back and forth from the administration likely stems from the fact that officials within it are split, with people like senior adviser Stephen Bannon and Environmental Protection Agency administrator Scott Pruitt urging the president to withdraw from the deal, and people like Secretary of State Rex Tillerson saying that the U.S. should remain in it.

Pressure to stay in the Paris agreement isn’t just coming from members of the White House, either. Polls show that 71 percent of the American public supports the deal, so pulling out would prove to be highly unpopular with American voters. But another faction is begging the president to keep the deal in place: American businesses and fossil fuel companies.

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Roasted Tomato Soup with Open-faced Grilled Cheese

Posted  April 19, 2017  by  Julie

Even though buds are popping out in the back yard as we speak, I’m in a comfort food state of mind – and really, for many of us grilled cheese and tomato soup are about as nostalgic as it gets. I got it in mind awhile ago to take the gooey toasted bread that typically lids a baked French onion soup and apply it to tomato soup using cheddar, and save us all the trouble of dunking our grilled cheese sandwich into our soup. I mean, look at it. Although it’s not exactly tomato season, I like to pull out a good can of tomatoes for soup – and it can rely just on canned, if that’s what you have. I happen to be clearing all the rogue tomatoes out of my freezer – when they start getting wrinkly, I toss them in whole, and then drop them straight from the freezer into soups, stews, chilis, whatever benefits from a little tomato. If you’re someoneContinue reading

The post Roasted Tomato Soup with Open-faced Grilled Cheese appeared first on Dinner With Julie.

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“Creative women with less attractive faces seem to be perhaps penalised in some way”

Posted  April 19, 2017  by  Kathy Shaidle
“Creative women with less attractive faces seem to be perhaps penalised in some way”

What did we do before “studies”? In one test, there was a 100-word text based on “The Lovers,” a surrealist painting by Rene Magritte in which two lovers kiss, their heads strangely covered in white cloths. Half of these texts, attributed to the persons pictured, were dull or factual (“Are they being held hostage?”), and […]

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“Who on earth wants to live forever with the people who want to live forever?”

Posted  April 19, 2017  by  Kathy Shaidle
“Who on earth wants to live forever with the people who want to live forever?”

I met my first transhumanist around 1986, and assure you that Steven Poole is absolutely right: The apparent paradox, then, is that so many transhumanists, while bent on defeating or ‘solving’ death, also seem rather, well, misanthropic. To be transhumanist is on some level also to be anti-humanist: people tell O’Connell what contemptible ‘monkeys’ current […]

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How we chose the cover: May/June 2017 Canadian Geographic

Posted  April 19, 2017  by  Anonymous

It’s a tale of three cities, so to speak.

When we pitted Calgary, Toronto and Vancouver cityscapes against one another for our May/June 2017 issue cover vote — held each issue to solicit feedback from our followers — we didn’t know what to expect. People are passionate about their cities, and each of these busy centres is home to a large percentage of our readers. Nevertheless, after thousands of Canadians had clicked for their favourite, nearly half (48 per cent) preferred the Pacific Coast’s City of Glass.

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Steve Sailer: “Since the downfall of the Gestapo, nobody has treasured the verb ‘interrogate’ as much as postmodern academics”

Posted  April 19, 2017  by  Kathy Shaidle
Steve Sailer: “Since the downfall of the Gestapo, nobody has treasured the verb ‘interrogate’ as much as postmodern academics”

Steve Sailer writes: The Hitlerian vocabulary of Studies professors suggests that although we hear so much about the dangers of the “alt-right,” we ought to learn more about the “ctrl-left.” The counterpart to all this policing of others’ expressions for the crime of offending one’s amour propre is self-obsession. The deadpan Twitter account New Real […]

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Penelope Trunk: “Silicon Valley is a perfect storm for middle-class domestic abuse”

Posted  April 19, 2017  by  Kathy Shaidle

Meet your OTHER moral and intellectual superiors, ev’buddy! Silicon Valley is full of shit. The feminist narrative of Silicon Valley makes me want to stab my eyes out. Sheryl Sandberg spent years convincing women that they should idolize her and try to emulate her by “leaning in.” She has since backtracked on her Lean In […]

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Destroying EPA Protections Will Disproportionately Hurt Children

Posted  April 18, 2017  by  Farron Cousins

President Donald Trump’s proposed 31% budget cut for the Environmental Protection Agency is devastating for anyone who isn’t financially connected to the fossil fuel industry. Reversing the course on projects that include reducing carbon emissions, protecting rivers and streams from industrial pollutants, and investments in renewable energy is not only bad for the planet, but it is a disaster for human health. And those most at risk of a potentially more toxic environment are children.

There are several reasons why children are more susceptible to pollution than adults, with the most obvious being that they spend more time outdoors and are more likely to come in direct contact with dirt, water, and plant life.

But the real danger to children lies in their biology.

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“The Battle(s) Of Berkeley–Someone Is Going To Get Killed. Where Is Trump?”

Posted  April 18, 2017  by  Kathy Shaidle
“The Battle(s) Of Berkeley–Someone Is Going To Get Killed. Where Is Trump?”

James Kirkpatrick writes: Regardless of what happens in Alabama, it is also all but certain there will be another Battle of Berkeley in two weeks, when Ann Coulter is scheduled to speak in California on April 27. (…) Of course, the “whole Trump administration” doesn’t seem to care too much about what is happening one […]

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“Norman Podhoretz’s War on the Haters and the Losers”

Posted  April 18, 2017  by  Kathy Shaidle

Written by Jeet Heer tho: While Podhoretz would’ve called himself a liberal in 1967, all the traits that led to his shift to the right in the early 1970s were already present in Making It. In the sharpest review of Making It, Wilfrid Sheed accurately describes it as having a “Ayn-Rand-and-water” program. Podhoretz’s hatred of […]

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Dark Corners: “She Shoulda Said No” (1949) and “The Devil’s Weed” (1936)

Posted  April 18, 2017  by  Kathy Shaidle
Dark Corners: “She Shoulda Said No” (1949) and “The Devil’s Weed” (1936)

Although I don’t find anti-marijuana “mental hygiene” films as self-evidently amusing as most people… More from my siteDark Corners: ‘Devil Girl From Mars’ (1954)Dark Corners: ‘The Devil’s Hand’ (1961)Dark Corners tackles ‘Race With the Devil’ (1975)Dark Corners reviews ‘Don’t Open ‘Til Christmas’ (1984)

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My NEW Taki’s column: Ayn Rand’s Laxative Diet, or: The Menopause Theory of “Atlas Shrugged”

Posted  April 18, 2017  by  Kathy Shaidle
My NEW Taki’s column: Ayn Rand’s Laxative Diet, or: The Menopause Theory of “Atlas Shrugged”

(I like my title better!) Yet the sprinklings of patriotic, almost Capra-esque populism that softened The Fountainhead’s unavoidable elitism are absent entirely in her follow-up, Atlas Shrugged, replaced by an almost hallucinatory misanthropy. What happened, Burns wonders, in the intervening thirteen years? The answer seems obvious to me now, rereading her book in my 50s: […]

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Troubleshoot Paused State of Virtual Machines

Posted  April 18, 2017  by  Anonymous

Stability of virtual machine is extremely necessary for the maintenance of VHD files. If we ignore the early signs of virtual machine failure, we may consequently lose our critical VHD files. One of the most commonly observed errors is the paused state of the virtual machines. User must take immediate action against this issue in … Continue reading Troubleshoot Paused State of Virtual Machines

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Google launches new and improved Google Earth, with more ways to explore the world

Posted  April 18, 2017  by  Anonymous

Screenshot of the new Google Earth

Four-and-a-half billion years ago, the Earth formed. Around 1.9 million years ago, homo erectus began exploring outwards from Africa. In 1991, the Internet provided a new way for modern humans to explore the world. Now, as of April 18, we can explore anywhere in the world from any device, anytime, anywhere with the new Google Earth.

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An Update on NS Rockets, Intelsat Hunting for Canadian Gov’t Satellite Contracts & More Ukrainian Lybid News

Posted  April 17, 2017  by  Chuck Black
          By Henry Stewart

For the week of April 17th, 2017, here are a few of the stories we’re currently tracking for the Commercial Space blog:

  • The CBC seems to be fascinated by Maritime Launch Services (MLS) and it’s so far unfunded effort to place a Ukrainian built Cyclone-4M commercial rocket launching facility in Nova Scotia.

As outlined in the April 11th, 2017 CBC News post, “It is rocket science: New details revealed about proposed space port in Nova Scotia,” the company “with plans to launch rockets from Nova Scotia has applied to lease 15 hectares of provincially owned land outside Canso, according to documents obtained by CBC News.”

Evidently, the “272-tonne rockets will be constructed in Ukraine,” then “loaded aboard a RoRo (Roll-On, Roll-Off) vessel and carried across the North Atlantic for delivery to the Port of Mulgrave and then barged to the Port of Canso as regulated by Transport Canada marine security requirement.”

Others have reacted more cautiously. 

As outlined in the April 17th, 2017 Herald chronicle post, “Spaceport project hinges on moose count,” the project still needs to show it can be built in compliance with local laws and requirements. 

An MLS Industry Day Meeting is planned for April 27th, 2017 in Antigonish, NS and will include a presentation by MLS president Steve Matier plus “invitation-only, one-on-one meetings.”

According to the article: 

MLS is continuing to develop relationships with local and regional companies to support their construction and operations plans for the facility with the intention to hire locally as much as possible.

As outlined in the September 11th, 2016 post, February 6th, 2017 post, “Europe Will Fund the Prometheus Reusable Engine; Canada Pitched Cyclone-4’s,” MLS is essentially acting as a local agent for Ukrainian based Yuzhnoye, which designed the rocket originally for Brazil and needs at least $100Mln CDN to fund any NS based facility. 

MLS CEO John Isella even continues to work out of the Washington, DC Yuzhnoye office, where he also acts as the North American representative for Yuzhnoye business development.

It’s worth noting that some space focused sites, like the Canadian based SpaceRef.com and the international focused Space Daily, pass off press releases as original news. An example would be the March 29th, 2017 Intelsat General promotional post, “Commercial Space Operators To Canada: “We’re Here, and We can Help,” seen here beside the identical April 13th, 2017 Space Daily editorial post, “Commercial Space Operators To Canada: “We’re Here, and We can Help.”” Graphic c/o Satcom Frontier & Space Daily. 

The new project is a replacement for the Canadian civilian/military hybrid Polar Communications & Weather (PCW) satellite constellation which, as outlined in the July 17,th 2016 post, “The Polar Communications & Weather Satellite (PCW) Mission is Dead; To Revive it, our Military Wants More Money,” was cancelled last year and replaced with a international, military focused program.

The budget for the ESC program is estimated at up to $2.4Bln CDN.

As outlined in the March 14th 2017 Defense Watch post, “Canada talking to US, Norway and Denmark about footing bill for new Arctic military satellite,” a contract is currently scheduled to be awarded in 2020 and the spacecraft could be launched as early as 2024.

The core of the Intesat strategy is outlined in the March 29th, 2017 SATCOM Frontier post, “Commercial Space Operators To Canada: “We’re Here, and We can Help.” SATCOM Frontier is part of the marketing arm of the US subsidiary of Intelsat. 

The potential for large, foreign firms to bid on large Canadian government satellite contracts was first raised in the January 31st, 2017 post, “Satellite Servicing, Orbital ATK, MDA, “Security Control Agreements,” CETA, Minister Duncan’s Science Adviser & Nova Scotia Spaceports.”

The 1845 kg Lybid-1 communications satellite. Graphic c/o Kyiv Post.
  • The Ukrainian state news agency Interfax-Ukraine is again reporting that the “first Ukrainian telecommunications satellite,” could finally be placed into orbit in the fourth quarter of 2017.

The Lybid-1 was built by Richmond, BC based Macdonald Dettwiler (MDA) under contract to the State Space Agency of the Ukraine (SSAU) using an ISS-Reshetnev developed Ekspress-1000 bus and an MDA developed communications payload.

As outlined in the December 9th, 2016 Interfax Ukraine post, “SSAU seeks to prepare for launch of first Ukrainian satellite Lybid in 2017,” the Canadian Export Development Canada (EDC), provided a $254.6Mln CDN loan under “Ukrainian government guarantees to finance the project in the summer of 2009. Initially it was planned to put the Ukrainian satellite into orbit in 2012, later it was postponed to 2013 and then to April 2014,” when the November 2013 Ukrainian crisis erupted and launch plans were shelved. 

As outlined in the April 12th, 2017 Interfax-Ukraine post, “Ukrainian satellite Lybid could be launched by late 2017 – acting SSAU head,” the latest report originates with the “acting head” of the State Space Agency of Ukraine (SSAU), Yuriy Radchenko, who said that an additional $17Mln US ($23Mln CDN) had been committed by Ukraine in order to complete the project.

As outlined originally in the December 12th, 2016 post, “exactEarth, Lybid-1, the CSA (which Needs more Committees) and the Upcoming 2017 Earth Observation Summit,” the completed Lybid-1 satellite is still being stored at Reshetnev in Krasnoyarsk (Russia), while the “Canadian partner is holding talks with Russia to get guarantees to launch the satellite” sometime in 2017.” 

For more, check out our upcoming stories in the Commercial Space blog.

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Henry Stewart is the pseudonym of a Toronto based aerospace writer.

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How Climate Change Ensures Hotter Weather as New Normal for Boston Marathon

Posted  April 17, 2017  by  Steve Horn
Crowd watching runners pass during the 2010 Boston Marathon

The 121st Boston Marathon has come and gone, and once again temperatures rose above normal, a perennial concern for runners hoping to hit fast times in this historic Patriot’s Day race.

When the gun went off for the elite women’s race at 9:30 a.m. ET, it was 70 degrees Fahrenheit, and by the time the winner crossed the finish line on Boylston Street 2 hours 21 minutes and 52 seconds later, the mercury had creeped into the low 70’s. The average high for Boston in April is 56 degrees F.

Scientific studies have shown that ideal marathon racing conditions range between roughly 40 and 45 degrees F. Warmer weather and higher humidity makes it more physiologically difficult to maintain a consistent pace.

But this year was not an aberration. Last year’s starting temperature was also high, hitting 71 degrees F. The 2012 race began at 65 degrees and 2015 at 61. And as scientists have pointed out, high temperatures could be the new normal for this famous race, meaning its days of breaking running records could become much rarer.

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Chemical Security: Protecting Syrians, But Leaving Americans Exposed

Posted  April 17, 2017  by  guest
Aerial view of destruction of West, Texas, chemical plant after 2013 explosion

This is a guest op-ed by Russel Honoré, Randy Manner, and David Halperin

In the torrent of Trump administration actions to void Obama-era regulations, one such move stands out right now as particularly disturbing.

For decades, our country has failed to squarely address the dangers of hazardous chemical facilities — from oil refineries to water treatment plants. An accident, natural disaster, or deliberate attack could trigger an explosion or chemical release that could kill thousands of people. Millions of our citizens live and work near these dangerous facilities.

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"Massive" Review of Federal Science Funding Finally Released; Will Likely Soon "Drop Down the Memory Hole"

Posted  April 17, 2017  by  Chuck Black
          By Chuck Black

The “massive” review of Federal science funding, announced in June, 2016 by the Justin Trudeau Liberal government, finally released its report on April 10th.

But the review is expected to quickly slide into irrelevance because of its first recommendation for additional funding to assist “younger researchers” attempting to establish their careers through government funded research and its second recommendation, to form yet another committee tasked with further assessing the situation.

Federal science minister Kirsty Duncan commenting on the report by a federal panel looking at scientific research funding in Canada, in Ottawa on April 10th, 2017. As outlined in the April 11th, 2017 National Observer post, “Canada trails 11 countries in clean tech research, report finds,” the “overall conclusion” of the report was that “independent science and scholarly inquiry have been underfunded for much of the last decade.” For those of us who prefer to peruse the primary source materials before drawing conclusions, the complete report, under the title “Investing in Canada’s Future; Strengthening the Foundation of Canada’s Research,” is available online on the Science Review website. Photo c/o Alex Tétreault.
A reasonable person might ask why this will happen? That answer is revealingly obvious. 
The government simply doesn’t expect many of the already established scientists who currently receive the overwhelming majority of federal grants under programs administered through the National Research Council (NRC), the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC), the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC), and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), as well as programs like the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI), the various Canada Research Chairs, Genome Canada and others to give up their existing funds without a fight.

So the only real option to assist young researchers is to allocate more funds, which will be difficult to do if the ruling Liberals want to cut into Canada’s growing federal deficit. As outlined in the Jan 5th, 2017 CBC News post, “Decades of deficits could be ahead for Canada, federal analysis warns,” the existing deficit will be very difficult to tackle. 

So the report may never be acted upon, which is as good a reason as any to form another committee and study the situation some more.

Maybe someone on the next committee will even come up with a better idea.

Fortunately, many university students are picked up by the private sector after getting their BA. To celebrate, here’s a cartoon from the undated, and terribly pessimistic, College Express post, “The 20 Steps of Graduate Research…Told in Cartoons.”

As outlined in the April 10th, 2017 Globe and Mail post, “Massive review of federal science funding reveals risks to younger researchers,” the federal government spends more than $10Bln CDN on science and technology annually and: 

About half that amount is directed toward so-called intramural research and regulatory science conducted in federal labs that fall under the purview of various ministries, including more than $1-billion a year for the National Research Council of Canada, and was not considered by the review panel.

The review called for an increase of “base-level spending” by “core funding agencies” to $4.8Bln a year from the current $3.5Bln CDN  after a four year “ramp up period.”

It also criticized an overly siloed research system that the panel called “weakly co-ordinated” and “inconsistently evaluated,” often to the detriment of younger researchers who are trying to establish their careers in a fast moving and competitive landscape.

The report recommends the creation of more structure, including a senior-level advisory council that would ride herd over the entire funding framework. As outlined in the post: 

…the proposed National Advisory Council on Research and Innovation would be composed of 12 to 15 members, including prominent scientists and scholars. The new council would be given the task of reviewing and assessing all components of the funding system and weighing in before the government launches any new funding organizations and initiatives.

In essence, the review has recommended the creation of another committee, which will further “assess” and “review.”

It’s often surprising to note the items which fall down the memory hole. Take, for example, the April 12th, 2016 post, “The National Research Council Doesn’t Fit Within the Current Innovation Agenda,” which discussed the underlying reasons leading up to the June 2016 announcement that the Federal government would conduct a review of the machinery in place to support science and scientists in Canada. Graphic c/o The Commercial Space blog

As outlined in the June 13th, 2016 post, “Government Announces Comprehensive Review of Canadian Science,” the independent panel, which reported to Science Minister Kirsty Duncan, was tasked with reviewing the program machinery currently in place to support science and scientists in Canada.

The panel was originally expected to issue a public report before the end of 2016.

Chuck Black.
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Chuck Black is the editor of the Commercial Space blog.

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What’s For Dinner? Chicken Dinner Menu

Posted  April 17, 2017  by  Anonymous

Easy recipe ideas for a Chicken Dinner, complete with a salad and dessert option! – – – – – – Sometimes the hardest part of making dinner is actually deciding what to have.  Meal planning is hard.  I mean, when you’re making meals 3 times a day, 7 days a week, it can be very easy to find ourselves in a food rut.  So in an effort to help all of us with meal planning, I’ve decided to put together some complete meal menus and share them with you!  Simple, uncomplicated meals that can be made for any day of the week…busy weeknights or even Sunday dinner. It is my goal to try to have a new menu posted here every Sunday morning so you can have some ideas for your menu planning for the week. I’m going to make menus mainly for dinner, but every once in a while I’m also going to post menu ideas for breakfast and lunches.  I hope you will find this helpful in your own home menu planning! The first menu I’m going to share is this Chicken Dinner Menu.  This is a simple chicken dinner complete with a side salad and chocolate pudding for dessert. […]

The post What’s For Dinner? Chicken Dinner Menu appeared first on A Pretty Life In The Suburbs.

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