BlogsCanada.ca
Top Canadian Blogs and News Sites


 
 

LATEST POSTS !

 

 
0
comments
General

No Coca-Cola, Adding Fibre and Pro-Biotics Doesn’t Make Liquid Candy Healthy

Posted  May 25, 2017  by  Yoni Freedhoff

As the liquid candy business falters, Coca-Cola is desperately turning to the addition of pro-biotics and fibre to its juices and sodas in a bid to sustain their sales.

First up is Coca-Cola Plus. Launched in Japan each bottle of the diet soda beverage has 5gr of added insoluble fibre. According to its official press release,

Drinking one Coca-Cola Plus per day with food will help suppress fat absorption and help moderate the levels of triglycerides in the blood after eating

And a statement to that effect will apparently be placed directly on the front of the bottle.

Next up is Coca-Cola’s juice arm’s offering of Tropicana Essentials Probiotics, which along with its 7.25 teaspoons of sugar per glass (which incidentally is more sugar per glass than Coca-Cola), is reported to pack,

more than 1 billion active probiotics in each serving

What will they do for you?

According to Coca-Cola they will,

work to promote gut health

Desperate times call for desperate measures I suppose.

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

Part 10: 150 Years of Canadian Aerospace History

Posted  May 24, 2017  by  Chuck Black

MDA’s Rise, Spar’s Fall, STEM Antenna’s,  the Space Shuttle, the Canadarm, 

COMDEV & Optech 

          By Robert Godwin

Canada’s aerospace raison d’être has always derived from its immense size, its location in the far north as a vast, barely-tracked wilderness of incalculable resources and the logical requirements relating to defence, communications, utilization and exploration which naturally follow from its size and location.

While MacDonald Dettwiler (MDA), Canada’s newest aerospace company, was capitalizing on its first paid work, the well-established SPAR Aerospace suddenly came under attack.

The United States government had determined that the STEM antenna had become a strategic asset and so the Congress ordered American companies to reverse-engineer the device.

This decision came just a few years after the Soviet Union had already done the same thing and had deployed STEMs on many of their own satellites. In fact Soviet-built STEMs were sitting on the surface of Mars aboard the first spacecraft to soft-land on the red planet. In response to this existential threat SPAR purchased Astro Research in California, and the production of STEMs moved south of the border.

STEM had been aboard all three of America’s manned spacecraft and SPAR’s Vice President John Macnaughton was determined to have the company play a role in the next generation too – the Space Shuttle.

Despite the Telesat Canada Act, which was supposed to guarantee that Canadian satellites be built in Canada, the first geosynchronous communications satellite for Canada, the Anik A-1, was built by Hughes Aerospace in California. SPAR and RCA vigorously protested this decision and managed to win back contracts for some of the work. This had the fortunate side-effect of demonstrating to Hughes that the two Canadian companies could perform excellent work which led to many other satellites being built in Canada under contract to Hughes.

However, when the Nixon administration announced that it would be going ahead with the space shuttle program it was the potential to provide NASA with robotics which attracted SPAR to the program.

Then Spar Aerospace chairman Larry Clarke, left, and president John MacNaughton were optimistic about projects such as US Space Station Freedom and its potential for Canadian technology sales when this photo was taken in 1990. Space Station Freedom eventually morphed into the International Space Station (ISS) after funding cutbacks forced the US government to solicit international partners. Photo c/o Virtual Reference Library.

An arm designed to capture incoming spacecraft and bring them in to safely dock with a space station had been discussed at de Havilland for at least a decade. Canada was also leading the world in nuclear reactor design and in handling nuclear fuel rods. This capability would give Canada a head start when it came to robotic manipulators. George Klein had been involved in the first nuclear reactor built in Canada and had gone on to contribute to the world-class CANDU reactor. He had also invented the world’s first electric wheelchair and was an expert on gearing.

In 1969 NASA issued a contract to study potential remote manipulator systems for the upcoming manned orbital workshop (later known as Skylab). The report was filed in July of 1970 and it compared the usefulness of extravehicular mobility unit (or EMU, also known as “backpacks“) to stand-alone service vehicles (also known as “bottle suits“) and gear driven robotic manipulator arms.

One of the candidates put forward was a multiple jointed robotic arm and hand made up of a connected series of STEMs. This system could theoretically reach around the Skylab station and perform useful tasks while being steered by an operator inside the pressurized confines of the Skylab multiple docking adapter module.

Klein’s STEM had already been used throughout the 1950s as a way of deploying beacons. Then in the 1960s it had done sterling service as the antenna of choice on dozens of spacecraft. Now it was being considered as the basis of a space manipulator system.

Initially the contract pursued was for the proposed space telescope, but Macnaughton wanted SPAR to also bid on a robotic manipulation system for the shuttle. The simple STEM which had started life as a rapidly deployable antenna for trucks and aircraft was to about to give birth to the most sophisticated robotic tool to ever fly in space.

Skylab would fly in 1973 without a remote manipulator system, an oversight which in hindsight almost caused the entire mission to fail. The first crew had to conduct spacewalks to save America’s first space station due to various deployment failures after launch. One of the main solar panels had not extended; an issue which presented STEM with yet another opportunity. STEMs would later be used for solar panel deployment on many spacecraft.

While SPAR investigated the future of space robotics the aircraft industry was still in some chaos. In May of 1974 the Government of Canada purchased de Havilland Canada from Hawker Siddeley for $38.8M. This was the beginning of the government’s attempt to further consolidate and manage the Canadian aerospace sector.

Eighteen months later they purchased Canadair from General Dynamics (for $38Mln CDN) which at that time was manufacturing long-range patrol aircraft for Lockheed. A few months later Canadair announced plans to build a civilian jet designed by William Lear of Learjet. None of this consolidation resolved the still outstanding problem of what kind of fighter interceptors were going to patrol Canada’s home shores. The Voodoo was now considered to be old technology and a whole new generation of fighters were being concocted in the factories south of the border.

Val O’Donovan. Photo c/o Waterloo Region Museum.

Also in 1974 two Canadians working in Quebec both launched new companies with an eye to continuing Canada’s primary leads in communications and atmospheric and resource studies. They were named ComDev and Optech. Both companies came out of the research laboratories at RCA Canada. ComDev became a household name under the leadership of Michael Valentine O’Donovan.

O’Donovan had figured out a new way to multiplex radio transmissions. His device would make satellites more versatile and lighter. In his seminal paper he wrote, “In multi-channel microwave radio relay systems it is sometimes necessary to have a number of transmitters and receivers simultaneously utilizing the same aerial. To achieve this a complex branching system is necessary.”

O’Donovan would take this concept and build one of Canada’s pre-eminent aerospace companies. Over more than three decades Com Dev’s fortunes waxed and waned but their technology remained first class. Like many companies its long history and line of products and patents eventually attracted a foreign takeover.

Optech’s Alan Carswell had created an advanced Lidar with help from York University. It was one of the sensor systems which Lapp had recommended to the Canada Centre for Remote Sensing (CCRS) back in 1969.

Optech adapted Lidar technology to create portable, versatile systems which could map and study the ground and atmosphere in ways never before anticipated and made Optech into a world leader in the field.  

Robert Godwin.
_____________________________________________________________

Robert Godwin is the owner and founder of Apogee Space Books, the Space Curator at the Canadian Air & Space Museum and an American Astronautical Society History Committee Member.

He has written or edited over 100 books including the award winning series “The NASA Mission Reports” and appeared on dozens of radio and television programs in Canada, the USA and England as an expert not only on space exploration but also on music.  

His books have been discussed on CNN, the CBC, the BBC and CBS 60 Minutes. He produced the first ever virtual reality panoramas of the Apollo lunar surface photography and the first multi-camera angle movie of the Apollo 11 moonwalk. His latest book was written with the late Frederick I Ordway III and is called “2001 The Heritage and Legacy of the Space Odyssey” about the history of spaceflight at the movies.

Last Week, “The Canada Centre for Remote Sensing, Synthetic Aperture Radar, SEASAT, John Macdonald and MDA,'” in part nine of “150 Years of Canadian Aerospace History.

Next Week, “Spar, SeaSat and more,” as part eleven of “150 Years of Canadian Aerospace History” continues.

On sale now, at Apogee Books.

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

Trump’s Budget Delivers Big Oil’s Wish: Reducing Strategic Petroleum Reserve

Posted  May 24, 2017  by  Steve Horn
Aerial view of three large crude oil storage tanks as part of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve

President Donald Trump‘s newly proposed budget calls for selling over half of the nation’s Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR), the 687 million barrels of federally owned oil stockpiled in Texas and Louisiana as an emergency energy supply. 

While most observers believe the budget will not pass through Congress in its current form, budgets depict an administration’s priorities and vision for the country. Some within the oil industry have lobbied for years to drain the SPR, created in the aftermath of the 1973 oil crisis.

Leading the way has been ExxonMobil, which lobbied for congressional bills in both 2012 and 2015 calling for SPR oil to be sold on the private sector market. The Trump administration says selling off oil from the national reserve could generate $16.58 billion in revenue for U.S. taxpayers over the next 10 years.

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

Watch Mark Steyn answer my tacky question!

Posted  May 24, 2017  by  Kathy Shaidle
Watch Mark Steyn answer my tacky question!

More from my siteRose Parks has a lot to answer forMark Steyn answers your questions about Little Prig Mann’s legal threatsMark Steyn: ‘What makes this case unique is the behavior of Bergdahl’s commander-in-chief’David Crosby — old hippie who couldn’t play an instrument — says punks can’t play their instruments

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

Alex Cuba and Delhi2Dublin to headline at Canada Place’s Canada 150 celebrations

Posted  May 24, 2017  by  Jennie Ramstad

Take in tunes by Alex Cuba, Delhi2Dublin, Sam Roberts, Fefe Dobson, Hey Ocean!, Dragonette, Emerson Drive, Madeline Merlo, and the Matinee.

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

Hordes of parents dejected after Steveston sea lion fails to eat their children

Posted  May 24, 2017  by  Craig Takeuchi

Throngs of forlorn and distraught parents have been streaming out of Steveston.

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

58 things to do in Metro Vancouver on Thursday, May 25

Posted  May 24, 2017  by  Steve Newton

Keep busy with these events.

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

New Game of Thrones trailer whets Westeros appetites

Posted  May 24, 2017  by  Jennie Ramstad

Game of Thrones is trending on Twitter and you know what that means.

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

3 Specialty Bars Every Gym Should Have, and 3 That Are Awesome To Have

Posted  May 24, 2017  by  deansomerset

Barbells are fantastic, and something I strongly feel everyone should become somewhat proficient with. There’s hundreds of exercises you could get from them, and variations of each depending on what you’re working towards, but there are times when a straight bar just doesn’t fit with the person you’re working with, or with your own mechanics…… Read More

The post 3 Specialty Bars Every Gym Should Have, and 3 That Are Awesome To Have appeared first on DeanSomerset.com.

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

King Gizzard and the Lizard Wizard play the Commodore Ballroom on October 9

Posted  May 24, 2017  by  Jennie Ramstad

Tickets go on sale this Friday.

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

Nunavut gets failing grade on food security

Posted  May 24, 2017  by  Anonymous

$8 bread in Iqaluit

Nunavut is affected more than any other province or territory by household food insecurity, and needs remedial action, says a report published by the Conference Board of Canada last week. 

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

Op-Ed: Glacial Progress at Bonn Climate Talks Shows Why we Need to Exclude Big Polluters From Negotiations

Posted  May 24, 2017  by  guest
Bonn climate talks

When it comes to the fossil fuel industry participating in UN climate negotiations, it’s clear there is a conflict of interest – and demands for this to end are nothing new. But after fierce resistance to this idea during talks in Bonn last week from the EU, US and Australia, more needs to be done, argues Pascoe Sabido of Corporate Europe Observatory. With just six months to go before November’s COP23 climate negotiations, calls for big polluters to be excluded from the talks are growing.

Last May at the same ‘intersessional’ climate talks in Bonn, a group of countries representing more than 70 percent of the world’s population insisted on adding a conflict of interest provision in the negotiating text. It almost made it, were it not for an underhand move by the European Union and the USA which saw it removed.

Pulling the strings behind such moves: the world’s largest fossil fuel companies.

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

Ariana Grande x 2

Posted  May 24, 2017  by  Kathy Shaidle

John Paul Meenan in LifeSiteNews: I must confess that I had never heard of Ariana Grande until this morning. In the photo on her Wikipedia page, the 23-year-old singer is dressed in what looks like a naughty nightie, something you would buy in the back of Victoria’s Secret. Not exactly a role model one might […]

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

Gear review: Explorer-in-Residence Jill Heinerth tests the Keen Terradora hiker

Posted  May 24, 2017  by  Anonymous

hiking boots, Keen, flowers, field

Hiking boots are an exploration staple for me, but they aren’t always as functional in the field as I need them to be — and often, I can’t wait to remove my heavy footwear at the end of a long day. The Keen Terradora hiking boot has turned everything I know about hikers on its head. The Canadian footwear brand’s first women-specific hiker is both functional and street-worthy, capable and fashionable.

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

Rick McGinnis on Joseph Epstein and “the cultured life”

Posted  May 24, 2017  by  Kathy Shaidle

Rick McGinnis writes: He begins the essay with a reminiscence of teaching a course called Advanced Prose Style, and a quiz that he gave his students – “15 or so would-be – or as we say today, wannabe – novelists and poets” – to gauge, by his standards, their cultural literacy. The list contained names […]

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

Study shows Antarctic Peninsula is greening at an unprecedented rate

Posted  May 24, 2017  by  Anonymous

Antarctic greening, Antarctic Peninsula, climate change

Changes in the flora and fauna of the Arctic polar region as a result of global warming have been well-documented in recent years, but as a recently published study shows, the Antarctic Peninsula is also showing a greener palette.

Researchers from the University of Exeter in the U.K., continuing work begun in 2013 to examine the growth rates of 150-year-old mosses and microbes in the Antarctic Peninsula, found that the last 50 years in particular have seen a rapid change in these organisms. 

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

“You cannot read the stories of those killed or missing without choking, without tears…”

Posted  May 24, 2017  by  Kathy Shaidle

…without appreciating that even by the standards of contemporary terrorism there was something especially vile about this latest atrocity. This column is idiotic and infuriating even by Alex Massie’s “standards.” Better to read the comments instead. However, I break with him even in that statement, which means I suppose that he is a better person […]

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

Steve Sailer on “colour-blind” casting and “-face”

Posted  May 24, 2017  by  Kathy Shaidle
Steve Sailer on “colour-blind” casting and “-face”

Steve Sailer writes: [B]lacks tend to be talented, resonant singers, perhaps due to craniological differences. But the increasing levels of politicization and virtue signaling in our culture make us dumber about pragmatic differences among art forms. Thus, in the current year we’re discussing whether opera productions should refuse to hire a superior soprano to sing […]

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

How to outsmart WannaCry ransomware without paying Bitcoins?

Posted  May 24, 2017  by  Data Recovery Blog

Last few days were terrible for most of the Windows users, especially for those were running the older versions like Windows XP and Windows Server 2003. Many of them were greeted by a message “Ooops, your important files are encrypted,” following which their systems became completely inaccessible. Victims were not able to restart the computer … Continue reading How to outsmart WannaCry ransomware without paying Bitcoins?

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

Massachusetts Admits to ‘Regularly’ Allowing Companies to Edit Draft Pollution Permits

Posted  May 23, 2017  by  Anonymous
Protesters hold signs in the parking lot outside the Massachusetts DEP office

Officials from the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) acknowledged they regularly allow energy companies to exclusively preview and revise draft permits as a matter of common practice.

This admission follows DeSmog’s reporting on emails showing the state had quietly provided Spectra Energy (now Enbridge) several opportunities to edit a draft pollution approval permit for a compressor station in the town of Weymouth as part of its Atlantic Bridge gas project.

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

Chocolate Peanut Butter Marshmallow Squares

Posted  May 23, 2017  by  Julie

I realize I’ve been dishing up a lot of sweet stuff lately – I promise we do eat real food too on occasion. You know what a fan I am of those rainbow peanut butter marshmallow squares – last time I made a batch W loudly wished they had been chocolate peanut butter, only the very best flavour combination ever, and so of course I obliged. It’s easy – just swap the butterscotch chips for chocolate, which I’m far more likely to have around anyway. And ever since a friend singed hers on the stovetop last Christmas, creating these irresistibly tasty crispy bits, I’ve imagined them with a slight crunch from a handful of cereal. Which turned out to be a Very Good Idea. I realize in mid (late!) May, recipes should be full of asparagus and rhubarb, and all things that are currently poking their way through the freshly thawed ground. I’d apologize, but I’m sure you understand. As far as recipes go, theseContinue reading

The post Chocolate Peanut Butter Marshmallow Squares appeared first on Dinner With Julie.

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

Homeless people were some of the heroes after Manchester Arena bombing

Posted  May 23, 2017  by  Charlie Smith

One man talked about rushing inside the stadium and pulling nails out of children’s arms.

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

National Association of Manufacturers Attempts 11th Hour Escape from Our Children’s Trust Climate Lawsuit

Posted  May 23, 2017  by  guest

By Dan Zegart, originally published at Climate Investigations Center 

In a last-minute legal maneuver, the National Association of Manufacturers is trying to extricate itself from a closely-watched federal climate lawsuit 18 months after it won a legal battle allowing it to intervene in the case.

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

25 years ago today: Metallica plays the Pacific Coliseum, asses are kicked

Posted  May 23, 2017  by  Steve Newton

The metal legends were touring behind The Black Album.

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

Future Islands plays the Vogue Theatre on September 25

Posted  May 23, 2017  by  Jennie Ramstad

Tickets go on sale this Friday.

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

American record executive says he’s “coming” for those responsible for the cancelled Pemberton Music Festival

Posted  May 23, 2017  by  Travis Lupick

An L.A. music promoter has blasted the Pemberton Music Festival in an interview with Billboard magazine.

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

10 iconic images of Canada from Canadian Geographic's Instagram community

Posted  May 23, 2017  by  Anonymous

Cover of 150 ultimate canadian instagram photos

When Canadian Geographic editor Aaron Kylie came to me last year with the idea of creating a special issue of Instagram images of Canada, I jokingly suggested we call it “Canada Squared,” in homage to Instagram’s humble beginnings. The photo-sharing platform has long since expanded on its square roots, allowing vertical or horizontal images and video.

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

Homeless in Vancouver: Bugs—we know them when we see them, right?

Posted  May 23, 2017  by  Charlie Smith

Ladybugs—despite their name—are not bugs at all; they’re beetles. And while beetles are insects they are not bugs.

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

Bombardier’s Challenges

Posted  May 23, 2017  by  Chuck Black
          By Brian Orlotti

Over the past few weeks, tottering plane and train maker Bombardier has faced a series of upheavals that have put its already shaky future on even even more unstable ground. Those upheavals, reminiscent of an earlier age of confusion and cancelled Canadian built planes, suggest lessons for both the Canadian aviation and space industries. 

A Bombardier C100 in Delta Airlines livery.  As outlined in the May 23rd, 2017 Leeham News and Comment post, “Delta shoots down Boeing’s CSeries dumping claim,” not all US corporations are onside with the Boeing claim that Bombardier is “dumping” aircraft into international markets. Photo c/o Bombardier.
As outlined in the May 11th, 2017 CBC post, “Bombardier’s Pierre Beaudoin to quit executive role,” just hours before the company’s annual meeting in Dorval, QC, it was announced that Pierre Beaudoin, scion of the Bombardier family, was stepping down as Executive Chairman as of June 30th.

The news came amid a wave of public and shareholder outrage over board-proposed executive pay hikes of nearly 50%, despite massive employee layoffs, billions in debt still on its books and hefty bailouts from both the Quebec and Federal governments. Beaudoin later renounced the pay hikes and executives postponed their compensation plan to 2020. 

Prior to the annual meeting, five of Canada’s largest pension fund managers along with several large American institutional investors had stated that they no longer supported Beaudoin’s re-election as Executive Chairman, opposed Bombardier’s executive compensation plan and withdrew support for several director nominees. Beaudoin remains non-executive chairman of the company’s board of directors while Alain Bellemare, who replaced Beaudoin as CEO in 2015, remains in place as Chief Executive Officer.

Beaudin in the National Post. As outlined in the May 10th, 2017 Canadian Press article, “Canada’s largest pension fund manager and Alberta fund oppose Bombardier pay policy,” the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board and Alberta Investment Management Corp. “joined several large institutional investors in withholding support for the re-election of Bombardier’s executive chairman and opposing the company’s executive compensation plan.” Two days later, and as outlined in the May 11th, 2017 National Post article, “Bombardier chairman re-elected to the board amid public uproar over pay, steps back from executive role,” Beaudin was re-elected as Bombardier chairman but promised to reduce his role in the company. Photo c/o National Post.

In an effort to bolster its dwindling cash reserves, and as outlined in the May 18th, 2017 Financial Post article, “Bombardier in talks with Chinese aircraft manufacturer for potential investment: report,” Bombardier is allegedly in talks with the Commercial Aircraft Corporation of China, Ltd. (Comac), a state-owned aircraft maker considering either an investment in Bombardier’s aerospace division or the taking a stake in the CSeries aircraft program itself.

Comac and Bombardier’s relationship goes back some years. In 2012, the two firms signed an agreement to find commonalities between the Comac C919 and Bombardier Cseries jets to reduce training and maintenance costs. Bombardier has also advised Comac on its ARJ-21 regional jet, which went into commercial operation in 2016 after years of delays. The two companies have also considered joining forces to compete against aerospace behemoths Boeing and Airbus.

Perhaps by no coincidence, on May 18th, Boeing petitioned the US Commerce Department and the US International Trade Commission (ITC) to investigate subsidies (such as the $ 3Bln CDN bailout money from the Quebec and Federal governments) of Bombardier’s CSeries aircraft that it says have allowed the company to export planes at well below cost.

As outlined in the May 18th, 2017 CBC News post, “Cross-border aircraft rivals Bombardier, Boeing clash in trade hearing,” preliminary meetings on the issue are ongoing and a determination on the petition is expected by June 12th. 

Bombardier also builds trains, and as outlined in the May 13th, 2017 Toronto Star post, “How do Toronto’s light rail vehicles compare? It’s Bombardier versus Alstom,” Bombardier is also having difficulties in this area as well. As outlined in the post, “after a protracted dispute with Bombardier about delays to its light rail vehicle order for the Eglinton Crosstown LRT, Metrolinx has taken the drastic step of placing an order for cars with another company.” Photo c/o Randy Risling/ Toronto Star File Photo.

If the ITC determines there is a threat of injury to the US industry, preliminary countervailing duties could be announced in July, followed in October by preliminary anti-dumping duties, unless the deadlines are extended. Final determinations are scheduled for October and December. Boeing is calling for countervailing duties of 79.41% and anti-dumping charges of 79.82%.
Quebec Premier Couillard gesturing. Photo c/o Clement Allard / CP.

The US government’s investigation of Bombardier is the latest shot in the US’s escalating trade disputes with Canada and an ill portent for the NAFTA renegotiation triggered by US President Trump on May 18th and expected this summer.

In retaliation, and as discussed in the May 19th, 2017 St. Louis Post Dispatch post, “Boeing scrambles to save deal to sell St. Louis-made F/A-18s to Canada,” the Canadian Government has announced that it will review its planned $2Bln CDN purchase of 18 Boeing Super Hornet fighters as a stop-gap measure before running a full competition to replace Canada’s aging fleet of CF-18s.

Amidst the frustration and anxiety over Bombardier’s present and future came a counterpoint from Quebec’s premier.

As outlined in the May 22nd, 2017 Presse Canadienne post, “Québec needs to take care of Bombardier, says Couillard,” after visiting a Bombardier plant in Haifa, Israel, Premier Philippe Couillard stated that Quebec needs to take care of Bombardier because of its unique importance to the province.

But Boeing, as outlined in the May 23rd, 2017 post BNN post, “In Bombardier fight, Boeing sees ghost of Airbus ascent,” remembers the growth of another direct competitor and is not likely to give up this time without a fight.

Will Bombardier suffer the same fate as Nortel and RIM or, like the auto industry, be deemed “to big to fail?” Stay tuned.
Brian Orlotti.
  ______________________________________________________________
Brian Orlotti is a regular contributor to the Commercial Space blog.

Full Story »

 
0
comments
Bible

polaris

Posted  May 23, 2017  by  Anonymous

photo © tim marshall

The post polaris appeared first on Just a Smidgen.

{ This is a content exerpt only.. Please click on the Blog Title to continue reading this post, share your love, browse Just a Smidgen and more.. }

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

The surprising links between people and plants in the North

Posted  May 23, 2017  by  Anonymous

Purple-stemmed Angelica growing near Makkovik, in Labrador

A visitor to an isolated spot on the coast of Nunatsiavut, the Inuit region of Labrador, might be surprised to discover a patch of rhubarb growing there, but she’d be looking at evidence of a generations-old relationship between people and plants in the North. 

“A lot of people think that plants aren’t important in the circumpolar North,” says Erica Oberndorfer, a plant ecologist with Memorial University’s Labrador Institute. “But people there have a lot to say about them, and likewise plants have a lot to say about people, if you know where to look.”

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

Les liens surprenants entre les gens et les plantes dans le Nord

Posted  May 23, 2017  by  Anonymous

De l’angélique pourpre pousse à côté d’une vieille hutte de terre inuite sur East Turnavik Island, près de Makkovik (Labrador)

Un visiteur dans un lieu isolé sur la côte du Nunatsiavut, la région inuite du Labrador, pourrait s’étonner de découvrir une talle de rhubarbe, mais il verrait là le signe d’une relation multigénérationnelle entre les gens et les plantes dans le Nord. 

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

My NEW Taki’s column, inspired by the book “Tough Enough” and “heartlessness as an intellectual style”

Posted  May 23, 2017  by  Kathy Shaidle
My NEW Taki’s column, inspired by the book “Tough Enough” and “heartlessness as an intellectual style”

I’m not satisfied with this at all. I struggled to make myself clear. I knew exactly what I wanted to say, or thought I did, but got bogged down by mot juste matters: which “connective tissue” words to use (“to” or “towards;” etc.) And there is a lot I left out (maybe for the better.) It became […]

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

An Incredibly Belated Review of James Hamblin’s Terrific New(ish) Book

Posted  May 23, 2017  by  Yoni Freedhoff

Full disclosure: I received an e-copy of Hamblin’s If Our Bodies Could Talk: A Guide to Operating and Maintaining a Human Body for review from James’ publisher Doubleday. I should also disclose, I was likely predisposed to enjoying this book as I’ve long been incredibly fond of Hamblin’s Twitter feed and Atlantic pieces. I’d have written this sooner, but I have this rule of not writing about things I haven’t actually read myself and it took me longer than I expected – not because I didn’t enjoy it, but more because I fall asleep in about two seconds flat every night. Also, if you use the Amazon links I provide, Amazon will send me a tiny commission.

James Hamblin is a medical doctor. But he doesn’t practice medicine in its traditional seeing his own patients sense, instead his practice involves the translation of health into words for whoever wants to read them as he decided to pursue journalism and writing rather than the much safer path of radiology. Hamblin’s main platform is his work with The Atlantic where he’s a senior editor, and he’s also a must-follow (if you like wonderfully dry humour) on Twitter.

Hamblin’s book, If Our Bodies Could Talk: A Guide to Operating and Maintaining a Human Body, was published back in December. Simply, it’s a collection of questions spanning various topics about health, the human body, followed of course by Hamblin’s science-informed answers. It’s also a lot of fun.

From questions like,

Why don’t eyelashes keep growing

(and answers that include, “For three months, then, the hair is called a “club hair”. It is, like so many people in clubs, outwardly fin-looking but actually dead at the roots“), to

Does the G-spot exist?

(and Hamblin’s admonishment, “never liken it to a bike tire“), to

What about Smartwater?

(where Hamblin helps you to learn that “electrolyte enhanced” means “bullshit”), the book covers a lot of ground.

Because each question and answer are fairly short, the book makes for excellent bed time reading (in that sense it reminded me some of another book I loved – Bill Bryson’s A Short History of Nearly Everything). And along with the humour and pith, comes a great deal that’s both fascinating and informative (did you know that the hyperbole of carrot eating leading to better night vision arose in part as an attempt to conceal Britain’s discovery of radar in World War II, or that Ben Carson (yes, that Ben Carson), played an important role in the treatment of an exceedingly rare and devastating brain disease?).

So why do you need this book when you can simply Google those very same questions? I think Hamblin covers this aptly by noting that

Googling health information is roughly as reliable for finding objective answers as picking up a pamphlet on the subway floor

The book is a delight. Suitable too for those parents like me who want to find ways to teach their children in ways that don’t involve lecturing, that critical appraisal is sadly necessary in this day and age (another recommendation here is to listen to the podcast Science Vs. with them).

If you’re looking for a book that entertains while it educates and you’d like to purchase a copy for yourself, here’s an Amazon link to it for my American readers. And if you’re living here in Canada – this one’s for you (though at least when I was typing this, it would still be cheaper to use the American link).

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

What’s For Dinner? Homemade Burgers and Fries

Posted  May 22, 2017  by  Anonymous

A delicious dinner of Homemade Burgers and Fries!  Includes burgers, home fries, a tomato salad and brownies for dessert! – – – – – It’s time again for What’s For Dinner!  Every time I write one of these menu plans, I get reallllly hungry.  This week especially because it features my favourite home made burgers!  Burgers are the best.  And with home fries, it’s like summer on a plate! This menu is great for any time you are craving burgers, but it’s especially perfect for weekend BBQ’s, and gatherings with friends and family. Homemade Burgers and Fries Menu Main Dish:  Best Beef Burgers Side Salad:  Fresh Tomato Salad Side Dish:  Home Fries Dessert:  Chocolate Cream Cheese Swirl Brownies These really are the Best Beef Burgers!  I have been making burgers with this recipe for over 10 years and we just love them.  They’re juicy and so flavourful! This easy to make Home Fries recipe is the perfect side to burgers!  Just bake them in the oven until they’re nice and crispy…so good. Add a nice Fresh Tomato Salad, and your burger dinner is complete!  This salad adds just the right amount of crunch and sweet to accompany burgers and fries! And if you can fit it all in after all […]

The post What’s For Dinner? Homemade Burgers and Fries appeared first on A Pretty Life In The Suburbs.

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

Front Group Paid by Dominion Releases Shady Poll Showing Support for Dominion’s Atlantic Coast Pipeline

Posted  May 22, 2017  by  guest

This is a guest post by David Pomerantz crossposted from Energy and Policy Institute

The Consumer Energy Alliance, a front group for oil and gas interests and utilities including Dominion Energy Inc, has released a poll which it claims shows support for the Atlantic Coast Pipeline, a gas pipeline co-owned by Dominion.

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

The Progressive Conservative Association of Alberta Is Recruiting Its Own Troll Army!

Posted  May 22, 2017  by  bigcitylib

Talk shit on the Internet for Jason Kenney! Fat shame the socialist hordes!  Threaten the cucks and the squishes with death!  Most interesting bit is if you AREN’T a Conservative supporter but are willing to talk shit strictly for money, the …

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

Part 10: A History of the Canadian Space Program – Policies & Lessons Learned Coping with Modest Budgets

Posted  May 22, 2017  by  Chuck Black

More on the 1990’s, the CSA, “On-Going Budgets,” a 3rd “Long-Term Space Plan,” 

New Astronauts, More Satellites but Never Enough Funding

The 1999 Federal Budget. C/o fin.gc.ca.

By Graham Gibbs & W. M. (“Mac“) Evans

This paper, first presented at the 65th International Astronautical Congress, which was held in Toronto, Ontario from September 29th – October 3rd, 2014, is a brief history of the Canadian space program, written by two of the major participants.

When the government established the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) in 1989 the only budget it provided was for specific programs. The second Long-Term Space Plan (LTSP II) did the same.

The CSA did not have an “on-going” budget like all other government departments and this created significant long term planning problems. This was rectified in Budget 1999 when the government provided an on-going budget of $300Mln CDN per year (approximately the level of funding for the Canadian space program in 1990).

Associated with this new method of funding was the injection of $430Mln CDN of new funding over three years to finance several new space initiatives. These initiatives were the result of the government’s approval of LTSP III which included a re-balancing of the Canadian space program.

For the first time, the earth observation activities of the CSA received the largest portion of the space budget (almost 30%) while the remaining major activity areas (human presence in space, science, satellite communications, and technology development) each received about 15%.

The 1990’s saw a flurry of activity in Canada’s space program.

The 1992 crop of Canadian astronauts included (clockwise from top left) Marc Garneau, Chris Hadfield, Bjarni Tryggvason, Steve MacLean, Mike McKay, Dave Williams, Julie Payette and Robert Thirsk. Only McKay never reached space. As outlined on his CSA bio, “he resigned as an astronaut in 1995, but remained active in the program until 1997 working on projects such as the space vision system and the robotic arms for the International Space Station. After leaving the military in 2001, McKay joined the private sector.” Photo c/o CSA.

Three new astronauts were selected (Chris Hadfield, Dave Williams, and Julie Payette). There were more astronaut flights (eight) in the 1990’s than ever before or since, including Chris Hadfield’s flight to the Russian Mir space station in November 1995.

RADARSAT 1 was launched in 1995, propelling Canada into the select list of nations to have its own earth observation satellite and immediately capturing more than 15% of the world market for remote sensing data.

Mobile Satellite (MSAT) was launched providing mobile communications services across Canada and the US. Canadian scientific experiments flew on the shuttle and on the Russian space station Mir. Canada’s first instrument for interplanetary exploration was launched aboard a Japanese satellite (which unfortunately in 2003 missed Mars). Telesat (which in 1992 had become totally privatized when the government sold its shares in the company) launched two new satellites (Anik E1 and E2) and the nation’s first direct broadcast satellite (Nimiq).

To close the decade, in 1999, Canada’s Measurement of Pollution in The Troposphere (MOPPIT) science satellite was launched.

A new Space Policy Framework was adopted giving new policy direction to the Canadian space program. Canada’s participation in the International Space Station (ISS) program was re-confirmed after coming close to termination. And finally, the CSA was put on a stable, long-term (but insufficient, according to the space community) funding basis.

________________________________________________________________________
Graham Gibbs & Mac Evans. Photos c/o MyCanada & CSA.
Graham Gibbs represented the Canadian space program for twenty-two years, the final seven as Canada’s first counselor for (US) space affairs based at the Canadian Embassy in Washington, DC. 

He is the author of “Five Ages of Canada – A HISTORY from Our First Peoples to Confederation.”

William MacDonald “Mac” Evans served as the president of the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) from November 1991 to November 2001, where he led the development of the Canadian astronaut and RADARSAT programs, negotiated Canada’s role in the International Space Station (ISS) and contributed to various international agreements that serve as the foundation of Canada’s current international space partnerships.

He currently serves on the board of directors of Vancouver, BC based UrtheCast and as a member of the Federal government Space Advisory Board.

Last Week: The 1990’s, The Second Long-Term Space Plan, SCISAT, RADARSAT-2 & ‘Competitive Procurement’” in part nine of “A History of the Canadian Space Program: Policies & Lessons Learned Coping with Modest Budgets.”

Next Week: “The 2000’s and Beyond” as part eleven of “A History of the Canadian Space Program: Policies & Lessons Learned Coping with Modest Budgets,” continues.

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

Hour long conversation ranking Nicholas Cage performances!

Posted  May 22, 2017  by  Kathy Shaidle
Hour long conversation ranking Nicholas Cage performances!

More from my siteHey, who’s up for a two and a half hour long conversation about ‘Faster, Pussycat! Kill! Kill!’ (1965)?Nicholas Pell’s obit for LemmyStan Getz: ‘I think what we did was in spite of the drugs’When Nicholas Cage puts on that squeaky, nasal voice, that’s always a bad sign

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

Jim Goad: 1 + 1 = You’re Racist

Posted  May 22, 2017  by  Kathy Shaidle
Jim Goad: 1 + 1 = You’re Racist

Jim Goad writes: Short version: Blacks and Latinos score much lower than whites on math tests because they’ve internalized the false stereotype that they score lower than whites on math tests, a racist fiction that couldn’t possibly have originated from the quantifiable fact that blacks and Latinos scored lower than whites on math tests in […]

Full Story »