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General

Anybody there?

Posted October 11, 2019 by Anonymous

Just wondering if I should start up this blog again?  I have been away from it for more than two years now, and thinking maybe I would like to get it going again.  So maybe I will.  I am doing more on Twitter now, but it can be…

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General

Bayou Bridge Pipeline Construction Mess Poses Major Risk to Atchafalaya Basin

Posted October 11, 2019 by Julie Dermansky

Read time: 6 mins

It is a crime against nature,” Jody Meche, president of the Louisiana Crawfish Producers Association-West, said while scanning the Bayou Bridge pipeline right-of-way on the west side of the Atchafalaya Basin, the country’s largest river swamp in a designated National Heritage Area. 

His voice trembled with rage as he told me that he was speaking for all the animals living in the basin that can’t speak for themselves.

“The Bayou Bridge pipeline has left a dam across the Atchafalaya Basin affecting the fisheries, the birds, the otters, minks, raccoons, and nutria,” Meche said.

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General

#397 Burning your fingers while peeling off the first freshly baked cookie from the oven

Posted October 11, 2019 by Anonymous

It burns. Chocolate chips drip down your fingertips as that softly-crumbling cookie melts into a hot puddle of steamy goodness in the middle of your mouth. Gasp for air, pop your eyes, and suck in some cool breaths as you try to chew without touching that red-hot cookie lava. Part of what makes these cookies […]

The post #397 Burning your fingers while peeling off the first freshly baked cookie from the oven appeared first on 1000 Awesome Things.

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General

Shamans, Spirits, and Faith in the Inuit North

Posted October 10, 2019 by Anonymous

Shamans, Spirits, and Faith in the Inuit North

Kenn Harper’s new book (left) details traditional Inuit mythology such as the central story of Sedna (right) and how those beliefs came to interact with Christianity, which missionaries began introducing into the Arctic in the 19th century. (Left: Courtesy of Inhabit Media; right: Germaine Arnaktauyok: Sedna — The Ruler, 1994/courtesy of Inhabit Media)

In his new book In Those Days: Shamans, Spirits, and Faith in the Inuit North, Kenn Harper shares tales of Inuit and Christian beliefs and how they came to coexist —and sometimes clash — in the 19th and 20th centuries. During this period, Anglican and Catholic missionaries came to the North to proselytize among the Inuit, with often unexpected and sometimes tragic results.

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General

#398 Going to a movie on your own

Posted October 10, 2019 by Anonymous

It happened by accident the first time. Years ago I was staying after school but had late-night plans to meet friends at a downtown movie theater. I was going to catch a lift with my parents, watch the latest Bruce Willis blow-em-up, and then squeeze into my friend Mike’s rusty Saturn for the ride home. […]

The post #398 Going to a movie on your own appeared first on 1000 Awesome Things.

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General

Massachusetts Lawmakers Step Up Pressure on Enbridge to Scrap Controversial Gas Compressor Station

Posted October 9, 2019 by Anonymous

Read time: 4 mins

Lawmakers from Massachusetts urged Canadian energy-giant Enbridge on Wednesday to reconsider the siting of a compressor station in a densely populated area outside of Boston. In a letter to the company’s president and CEO Al Monaco, United States Senator and presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren, together with Senator Ed Markey and Representative Stephen Lynch, asked Enbridge to find an alternative to locating the compressor station in Weymouth.

Compressor stations, which propel natural gas through pipelines, emit a variety of pollutants and are usually built in rural areas.

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General

#399 Discovering a new shortcut on your drive home

Posted October 9, 2019 by Anonymous

Move over, Marco Polo. Columbus, Clark, and Cortes, you got nothing, either. Sure, maybe you sailed over choppy waves, fought with cannibals, and documented distant lands. Maybe you traded silk with kings, discovered precious stones, and toppled terrible empires. Maybe you even found new technologies and trade routes while helping us realize the Earth wasn’t […]

The post #399 Discovering a new shortcut on your drive home appeared first on 1000 Awesome Things.

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General

#400 Putting your own shoes back on after bowling

Posted October 8, 2019 by Anonymous

It’s like rolling a strike for your feet. AWESOME! Photo from: here — Check out my podcast 3 Books with Neil Pasricha —

The post #400 Putting your own shoes back on after bowling appeared first on 1000 Awesome Things.

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General

Celebrating 25 years of the Canadian Geographic Challenge with Alex Trebek

Posted October 7, 2019 by Anonymous

Alex Trebek and John Geiger at the 25th anniversary of the Canadian Geographic Challenge

Alex Trebek addresses guests at 50 Sussex during the launch of the 25th Canadian Geographic Challenge. (Photo: Ben Powless/Canadian Geographic)

On Saturday, October 5, Alex Trebek joined The Royal Canadian Geographical Society (RCGS) to launch the 25th annual Canadian Geographic Challenge at 50 Sussex, the RCGS’ headquarters in Ottawa.

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Children

Dear @BowlCanada, Selling Chocolate Should Not Be A Prerequisite For A Child To Play In Your Leagues

Posted October 7, 2019 by Yoni Freedhoff

This is not the first time someone has shared the story of a kids’ sports league that requires junk food fundraising, but it may be the first time that the league’s program coordinator explicitly stated that the child of a parent willing to pay a bit more instead of being stuck selling $50 of chocolate wouldn’t be welcome.

I’ve said it before and will say it again, our food culture is broken and junk food fundraising is just one small aspect of that, and when you question social norms, no matter how broken they might be, don’t be surprised when you get pushback. But damn, it’s depressing.

Here is the redacted email exchange I was forwarded

Parent:

Hello,

My kids’ dad signed our child up for bowling and is telling me I have to sell half of these chocolates.

I asked for information and the lane said that Bowl Canada mandates this.

So I have a few things to ask.

I’ve noticed that General Mills is a sponsor. Do they make the chocolates and are they the party that is behind this arrangement?

Why chocolate when we are in the midst of an obesity epidemic? Especially for an organization encouraging health? There are all sorts of fundraisers. If given the chance I would gladly purchase fresh vegetables through Peak of the Market, for example.

Also, why not give parents the option of giving a donation for tax deductible purposes rather than making them buy a bunch of poor quality chocolate that is probably connected to child labour? You’d still cover the costs you are hoping for.

Bowl Canada Program Coordinator

Dear [Redacted],

We are happy to hear that your child will be registering for bowling this season! Yes, Youth Bowl Canada has one official fundraiser each year and our tried and true method of raising funds, to help keep costs down for families, is the sale of chocolates.

Every two years, Youth Bowl Canada considers proposals from many companies offering an array of products, with various levels of monetary return which benefits all levels of bowling in Canada. Chocolate companies can repeatedly offered the best deal to not only bowling, but to schools, community clubs, etc.

General Mills was a sponsor of Bowl Canada last year, however it was simply a free game of bowling offer on select food products in stores. They have not wished to quote on our fundraisers in the past.

I hope I have addressed your concerns. Please feel free to reply should you have any further questions.

Parent

Hi [Redacted].

Thanks for your quick response. My understanding is, then, that these chocolate sales are mandatory if we want our kids in bowling. Is that correct?

If not correct, if this fundraiser is optional, no big deal; I don’t have to take part in something I find morally objectionable in order for my kid to have this opportunity.

If correct, that you require these chocolate sales, I would urge Bowl Canada to reconsider this policy, for 3 reasons.

1. It is objectionable to force fundraising on families. Some people are very good at this kind of stuff. Others have anxiety or lack the connections to have people to sell to. Sometimes the families least able to support a fundraiser are the ones whose kids most need this kind of programming.

2. This does not support physical health. As I mentioned, obesity is a major issue in society. I can appreciate that you are looking for good money makers but I think non-profits should be mindful of other considerations.

3. Why not give parents the option of something else? I am not going to sell these chocolates. If I end up buying half from my kids’ dad I will end up with chocolate I don’t want in my house and maybe end up throwing it out. I will have spent what? $50 on chocolate so Bowl Canada can get $20? I’d much rather just give you the $20 profit you are looking for. Why not just give me that option rather than making me spend more money than is necessary?

4. Chocolate is ethically problematic. Most chocolate manufacturers have child labour and harsh conditions as part of the production process. This is wrong and I believe what we support with our money should not hurt other people.

So I find myself between a rock and a hard place: I love my kid in bowling, it has been great for him. But I don’t think it’s right to force me to take part in something I find morally objectionable.

Please reconsider your policy.

Bowl Canada Program Coordinator

Hi [Redacted].

Yes, chocolate sales are required for the YBC program to participate in all YBC programs and events.

I will, however forward your concerns on to those that review YBC policies for future consideration.

Regards

Ugh.

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General

Geography teacher of the month: Alana Sawatsky

Posted October 7, 2019 by Anonymous

Burnaby teacher encourages her students to get outdoors

Alana Sawatsky loves to explore places like Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve and Haida Heritage Site, in British Columbia. (Photo: Alana Sawatsky)

Alana Sawatsky takes a climate justice approach to teaching, emphasizing what students can do to make a difference in the world and how geography is relavant to just about any subject. She encourages her students in Grade 10 social studies and Grade 12 geography at Moscrop Secondary in Burnaby, B.C., to get closer to nature to cultivate a sense of wonder and an emotional connection to the planet. She also teaches geography methods at the University of British Columbia. Here, she talks about inspiring her students and why geography is so important.

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General

#401 The sound of dry crispy leaves blowing across an empty parking lot

Posted October 7, 2019 by Anonymous

Orange skies burn as winds whisper for your chilly walk home. The sun dips down in the distance and dogs bark behind backyard fences as your hair blows wildly in the cool and crisp breeze. You squint into the wind and stuff your hands in your thin pockets as you sniff up that smoky sweet […]

The post #401 The sound of dry crispy leaves blowing across an empty parking lot appeared first on 1000 Awesome Things.

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General

Dominion Buys Pipeline Support at Supreme Court Through GOP Attorneys General

Posted October 5, 2019 by guest

Read time: 3 mins

By Kelly Roache, crossposted with permission from Energy and Policy Institute

With the US Supreme Court poised to decide this month whether it will review a ruling key to the Atlantic Coast Pipeline’s future, majority-owner of the project Dominion Energy has received support in its case from Republican state Attorneys General and the US Department of Justice. Both US Attorney General William Barr and the state Attorneys General have close financial ties to the utility – including through a GOP group that funneled millions to one key proponent.

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General

Already Burning for a Month, Fracked Gas Blowout in Louisiana Could Last Two More Months

Posted October 4, 2019 by Julie Dermansky
Gas well blowout burning in Louisiana on October 1

Read time: 7 mins

For the fifth week since the blowout began, a large flare is still burning at the site of GEP Haynesville, LLC’s blown out fracked gas wells in northwestern Louisiana. The blowout occurred on August 30, shortly after the company began a frack job, igniting two adjacent wells. A state official estimated that efforts to contain the blowout could take another two months, or more.

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General

Washington Petrochemical Plant Subsidies Would Violate Federal ‘Double Dipping’ Rules Say Environmental Groups

Posted October 4, 2019 by Sharon Kelly
Kalama methanol plant site

Read time: 7 mins

A plan to build a natural gas–fueled petrochemical plant in Kalama, Washington, ran into a new legal hurdle last week, as a coalition of environmental groups raised new objections to its construction.

The Port of Kalama methanol plant, if built on the Columbia River between Washington and Oregon, would expand North America’s capacity to export products produced by fracked shale gas wells, and is part of a $5.2 billion plan to develop methanol plants in this corner of the Pacific Northwest. It has applied for funding from a controversial Department of Energy “Advanced Fossil Energy Projects” program — an $8.5 billion fund offering taxpayer subsidies to the fossil fuel industry.

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General

Red meat might not be bad, deflecting asteroids, politics making us sick, growing human brains in the lab, evolution and orgasms and animals in the midnight sun.

Posted October 4, 2019 by Anonymous

Hear from the scientist who says red might not be so bad for us after all; NASA is testing a plan to deflect killer asteroids — by crashing into one; Could modern political strife be making us sick?; We’re making tiny brains in the lab — should we be worried for them?; Hear from a researcher who’s investigating how evolution explains the female orgasm; How does 24 hour daylight impact animals in the far North?

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General

Will the Fracking Revolution Peak Before Ever Making Money?

Posted October 3, 2019 by Anonymous
Fracking sites at night in Colorado

Read time: 7 mins

This week, the Wall Street Journal highlighted that the U.S. oil and gas shale industry, already struggling financially, is now facing “core operational issues.” That should be a truly frightening prospect for investors in American fracking operations, but one which DeSmog has long been warning of.

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General

Big Oil Pushes Back Against Minnesota Clean Car Announcement

Posted October 3, 2019 by Anonymous
Governor Tim Walz of Minnesota

Read time: 10 mins

Minnesota Governor Tim Walz announced last week that the state would be adopting a pair of clean car standards following California’s lead, even as the Trump administration tries to revoke California’s authority to set stricter standards under federal law. But Minnesota’s move is already prompting pushback from oil industry defenders and organizations tied to the Koch network, which is unsurprising given that fuel-efficient and electric vehicles are a clear threat to the profits of petroleum producers and refiners.

It’s a fight that is playing out across the country — including in the Land of 10,000 Lakes. 

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General

Oil Companies Sued by Baltimore Face Discovery in State Court

Posted October 2, 2019 by guest
Tropical Storm Isabel flooding in Maryland

Read time: 3 mins

By Karen Savage, Climate Liability News. Originally published on Climate Liability News.

A federal appellate judge ruled that Baltimore’s climate liability suit will proceed in state court, rejecting a motion by more than two dozen fossil fuel defendants to halt the suit while they try to convince the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals that the case belongs in federal court.

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General

Will Rail Be Key to Exporting Canada’s Tar Sands Oil to the World?

Posted October 2, 2019 by Anonymous
Fort McMurry, Alberta, tar sand mining

Read time: 6 mins

While Canadians turned out en masse for large climate protests last week, the country’s oil and gas industry continued its plans to ramp up and export its massive and polluting reserves of tar sands oil, also known as bitumen, to the rest of the world. 

Several recent developments in the rail arena are setting up the tar sands industry to realize those plans in a major way.

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General

The explorer versus the ice labyrinth

Posted October 1, 2019 by Anonymous

Adam Shoalts paddles across Great Bear Lake

Royal Canadian Geographical Society Explorer-in-Residence Adam Shoalts paddles through an ice-strewn Great Bear Lake, N.W.T., during his 2017 Trans-Canada Arctic Expedition. (Photo: Adam Shoalts)

The island’s shore was made up of fist-sized rocks that made land­ing somewhat difficult, especially now that I was more conscious than ever of the need to minimize wear and tear on the canoe. Smashing through ice had been a necessity, but I knew what ice could do to a boat, as I’d seen Titanic — twice … 

I sprawled out comfortably beneath a spruce tree in the middle of the island and dozed off. The cool breeze kept the mosquitoes to a tolerable amount. An hour passed before I stirred to check on the conditions.

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General

Whistle-blower Reveals Flawed Construction at North Dakota Gas Plants Where Massive Spill Was Downplayed

Posted October 1, 2019 by Anonymous
Paul Lehto

Read time: 11 mins

Two North Dakota gas processing plants in the heart of the Bakken oil fields have shown signs of an eroded safety culture and startling construction problems, according to Paul Lehto, a 54-year-old former gas plant operator who has come out as a whistle-blower. He described worrisome conditions at the Lonesome Creek plant, in Alexander, and the Garden Creek plant, in Watford City, where DeSmog recently revealed one of the largest oil and gas industry spills in U.S. history had occurred. Both plants process natural gas brought via pipeline from Bakken wells and are run by the Oklahoma-based oil and gas service company, ONEOK Partners.

The safety culture is embarrassing,” said Lehto, who has described to DeSmog the discovery of dozens of loose bolts along critical sections of piping, and other improperly set equipment, deficiencies he attributes to the frenzied rush of the oil boom that has dominated the state’s landscape and economy. “North Dakota is basically a Petrostate,” said Lehto, who worked at the two plants between 2015 and 2016. “There is regulatory capture, and sure that happens in other areas, but nowhere is it more extreme than in North Dakota.”

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General

Oil Industry Set Agenda During Climate Summit Meeting with Big Greens

Posted September 30, 2019 by Sharon Kelly
Pratima Rangarajan, CEO of OGCI Climate Investments

Read time: 9 mins

Last week, as climate activist Greta Thunberg addressed the United Nations Climate Action Summit, invited leaders from major environmental groups spent their day listening to the leaders of fossil fuel companies discuss how they want to respond to the climate crisis.

Depending on which room you were in, you would have heard two very different messages.

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General

California Polluters May Soon Buy Carbon ‘Offsets’ From the Amazon — Is That Ethical?

Posted September 29, 2019 by guest
Tropical rainforest and oil refinery

Read time: 6 mins

By Maron Greenleaf, Dartmouth College

Fires in the Brazilian Amazon have outraged the world. But what can people living far from the world’s largest rainforest do to save it?

California thinks it has an answer.

On September 19, the California Air Resources Board endorsed the Tropical Forest Standard, which sets the groundwork for electric utilities, oil refineries and other California polluters to “offset” their greenhouse gas emissions by paying governments in tropical forest areas not to cut down trees.

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General

Could Climate Change Fuel the Rise of Right-wing Nationalism?

Posted September 28, 2019 by guest
Flaming fist

Read time: 6 mins

By Joshua Conrad Jackson, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Michele Gelfand, University of Maryland

Two trends have defined the past decade and both have been on display at this year’s session of the United Nations General Assembly.

One has been the escalating effects of climate change, which were the focus of the United Nations’ Climate Action Summit. Forest fires, floods and hurricanes are all rising in their frequency and severity. Eight of the last 10 years have been the warmest on record. Marine biologists warned that coral reefs in the U.S. could disappear entirely by the 2040s.

The other trend has been the surge of right-wing nationalist politics across Western nations, which includes Donald Trump’s election in the U.S., and the rise of nationalist political parties around the world.

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General

Is Natural Gas the New Coal?

Posted September 27, 2019 by Anonymous
Greenhouse gas emissions from flaring and venting a fracked gas well

Read time: 7 mins

At a recent natural gas industry conference in Houston, Woodside Petroleum CEO Peter Coleman warned his colleagues to avoid the fate of another fossil fuel, according to trade publication Natural Gas Intelligence.

The industry really is at a critical juncture,” Coleman said. “We run the risk of being demonized like that other fossil fuel out there called coal.”

Oil and gas companies have been feeling mounting pressure, as signs emerge that oil is losing favor, both with the public amid climate concerns and with some investors.

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General

Plastic tea-bag particles, Venus was habitable, driver memory fail, earliest North American migrants, Plants ‘terraformed’ the Earth

Posted September 27, 2019 by Anonymous

New plastic tea-bags shed billions of tiny particles into the cup; Venus is a hellscape now, but might once have been blue like Earth; Lethal memory fail: why drivers see, and then forget motorcyclists; Ever older remains of early migrants rewrite the …

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General

Another Virtual Pipeline Truck Carrying Fracked Gas Crashes in New York. Local Climate Advocates Demand Urgent Action

Posted September 25, 2019 by Anonymous
XNG virtual pipeline truck crash in New York

Read time: 6 mins

On Monday around 1:00 a.m., a “Virtual Pipeline” truck carrying compressed natural gas mined from the Marcellus Shale crashed on Interstate 88 near Binghamton, New York, after the vehicle swerved to avoid deer, flipped over, and fatally ejected 52-year-old driver Jeffrey Lind. The truck’s container system began leaking compressed methane gas, a potent greenhouse gas, into the atmosphere. Governor Andrew Cuomo declared a state of emergency in Broome County, where the crash occurred.

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General

Greta’s UN Climate Summit Speech Successfully Predicted More Business as Usual From World Leaders

Posted September 24, 2019 by Julie Dermansky
Greta Thunberg at the UN Climate Action Summit

Read time: 7 mins

On Monday, the United Nations Climate Action Summit opened with a glossy video projected around the room. It hawked a hopeful message that climate catastrophe can be averted. With the lights turned down and music turned up, for a few minutes the summit felt like an IMAX movie experience. 

Unfortunately, the video is symbolic of the summit itself — all talk, little action,” Jesse Bragg, media director at Corporate Accountability, said via email.

A scathing speech by Swedish youth activist Greta Thunberg and the passing presence of President Trump upstaged presentations from world leaders, who in some cases did announce pledges to reach net-zero emissions by 2050 but overall failed to offer visionary solutions for the rapid transition away from fossil fuels.

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General

The US Is Exporting a Fracked Climate Catastrophe

Posted September 23, 2019 by Anonymous
Roughnecks on a drilling rig

Read time: 6 mins

This story is part of Covering Climate Now, a global collaboration of more than 250 news outlets to strengthen coverage of the climate story.  

According to climate scientists, limiting the worst impacts of climate change means weaning the world off of fossil fuels, not ramping it up. But two factors, the U.S. “fracking revolution” that helped boost domestic oil and gas production to record levels combined with lifting the 40-year-long ban on exporting crude oil in 2015, are complicating that vision.

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General

US Lobby Groups Most Effective at Blocking Climate Action – Report

Posted September 23, 2019 by Anonymous

Read time: 3 mins

US lobby groups representing the fossil fuel and automotive industries are world leaders when it comes to stalling government action on climate change, new research shows.

Of the top 10 trade associations considered to be the most effective at opposing climate-friendly policies globally, seven are based in Washington DC, according to a report published this week by lobbying watchdog InfluenceMap.

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Children

Weekly Elementary School Pizza Sales Nets Just $8.57 Per Student Per Year

Posted September 23, 2019 by Yoni Freedhoff

Last week I gave a talk to some parents at my youngest daughter’s elementary school.

The talk was about our ridiculous food environment where we are all the proverbial frogs in pots of water that have slowly been heated to a boil, where food, especially junk food, is constantly used to reward, pacify, and entertain our children as well as to fundraise for every cause.

Ironically, the day before the talk I received an email from the school’s parent council extolling me to sign my daughter up for weekly pizza days. In it I was told,

The most valuable fundraiser is Pizza Mondays. $0.50 of every order, every week goes to the [redacted]. It’s a win/win/win! One less lunch for you to make, a delicious (and nutritious) slice of pizza for your child and $16.50 to the [redacted]!”

Looking past the wisdom (or lack thereof) of children been taught by their school week in and week out, from Kindergarten to Grade 7, that fast food pizza is a normal, weekly, “nutritious“, meal, I couldn’t help but wonder just how valuable it really was in terms of fundraising, and so I asked principal.

She told me that the school’s Pizza Mondays cut raises $6,000 per year (12,000 slices served).

There are 700 students in the school.

$6,000/700 students/year = $8.57/student/year

And if Pizza Mondays are the most valuable fundraiser, then perhaps it’d be fair to assume that in total, the school raises $10,000/year in food sale initiatives. That would be $14.30 per kid per year.

Is there really no other way to raise $14.30 per kid than selling them, and normalizing, weekly (or multiple times per week) junk food?

I think there probably is, and here are 3 suggestions each of which by itself might do the job, let alone together (and these are just 3 ideas, there are so many more out there as well).

Fundscrip
Fundscrip is simple to describe. Parents buy gift cards from Fundscrip for stores they already shop at (supermarkets, gas stations, hardware stores, clothing stores, business and school supply stores, toy stores, book stores, electronic stores, restaurants etc.). The gift cards work just like regular gift cards (meaning they work just like cash) and are mailed directly to parents’ homes, and the school receives 2-5% (depending on the store) of the value of the gift cards. Given the average family of 4 in Canada’s weekly grocery bill runs in at a reported $220, if even only 10% of the school’s parents got involved, and if they only used the cards to cover half of their grocery costs, the 3% kickback to the schools would raise $12,000. And that’s just by way of groceries!

Grandparents’ Day
Many schools run grandparents’ days. Simply put they involve inviting all the kids’ grandparents to school, putting on some sort of song and dance production, giving the proud grandparents a tour, and either charging them a nominal fee for tickets ($5), or simply soliciting donations during the event (and perhaps annually having a singular cause which then gets branded for that year’s grandparents if monies raised). 700 elementary students should conservatively mean at least 1400 grandparents. If only half of them attended, and an average of $5/grandparent was raised, that would bring in $3,500.

School Parents’ Goods and Services Auction
With 700 families in our child’s school, there are clearly a great many different professions represented among the parents. Creating a night whereby parents can donate goods or services (with a cut to the school) is a great way to both raise money, and raise interest and awareness of the parent body’s businesses. Lawyers might donate a discounted will consultations, I could donate work with one of our RDs, or with our personal trainers, artists could donate their art, restauranteurs could donate meals, etc. Done right, and certainly once established as a valuable annual event, there’s no reason why this couldn’t raise $3,000-$10,000.

The bottom line is that schools truly don’t need to sell junk food to children to raise money as there are plenty of other means to do so. Yes, school sold junk food is convenient for parents who aren’t keen on making lunches every day, but given we are literally building our children out of what we feed them, and that weekly (daily in some cases) school junk food sales teaches kids, even those who don’t order them, that daily junk food is a normal, healthy part of life, taking the time to pack those lunches (or to teach our kids how to pack lunches themselves) is well worth it.

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General

Q&A: Michael Mann on Coverage Since ‘Climategate’

Posted September 21, 2019 by guest
Michael Mann

Read time: 9 mins

By Brendan Fitzgerald, CJRThis story originally appeared in Columbia Journalism Review (CJR). It is republished here as part of DeSmog’s partnership with Covering Climate Now, a global collaboration of more than 250 news outlets to strengthen coverage of the climate story.

Michael Mann’s work as a press critic began in earnest a decade ago. Ahead of the 2009 international climate-change summit in Copenhagen, hackers stole email correspondence between Mann and other climate scientists from a computer server at the University of East Anglia. Climate-change deniers used portions of the emails, freed from context, to attack the credibility of Mann, whose “hockey stick” graph charting the rapid rise of the Earth’s temperature since industrialization would become an emblem of the climate fight. Coverage of what news outlets called “Climategate” saved space for Mann’s critics; such choices emphasized conflict out of all proportion with the scientific consensus on a warming planet. In The Hockey Stick and the Climate Wars, his 2012 book, Mann called such false balance and sympathetic framing “a sweet victory for climate change deniers.” 

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General

New York City Climate Strike in Photos

Posted September 21, 2019 by Julie Dermansky

Read time: 3 mins

Greta Thunberg, the 16-year-old Swedish climate activist, inspired millions of students worldwide to take park in climate strikes on Friday, Sept. 20 to demand politicians take urgent steps to stop climate change. An estimated 250,000 strikers marched in New York City from Foley Square to Battery Park. 

The global climate strikes took place before the United Nations Climate Summit in New York City. The opening session of the summit is on Sept. 21, with the fitting kickoff: Young People at the Frontlines. Greta Thunberg will be addressing the assembly on Sept. 23.

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General

Quirks & Quarks women in science special — How science has done women wrong

Posted September 20, 2019 by Anonymous

The glass obstacle course: Why so few women hold the top spots in STEM disciplines; Women’s brains ARE built for science. Modern neuroscience explodes an old myth; Women and science suffer when medical research doesn’t study females.

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General

Climate Strikers Demand Climate Justice On ‘Historic’ Day Of Protest

Posted September 20, 2019 by Anonymous

Read time: 5 mins

Millions of children and adults are expected to strike across the globe today, inspired by Swedish activist Greta Thunberg’s call for climate action. 

The strikes are happening ahead of the UN Climate Summit, which is taking place in New York on 23 September. 

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General

How the Koch Network’s ‘Social Change’ Strategy Is Built to Kill the Electric Car

Posted September 18, 2019 by Ben Jervey
David Koch at an Americans for Prosperity event

Read time: 17 mins

This story is part of Covering Climate Now, a global collaboration of more than 250 news outlets to strengthen coverage of the climate story.  

If it feels like the oil industry’s attacks on the burgeoning electric car market are well coordinated, that’s because they are. The industry is following a blueprint laid out decades ago, and refined ever since, by Koch network insiders.

In a revelatory article, published in Philanthropy Magazine in 1996, an executive vice president of Koch Industries named Richard Fink laid out a three-tiered integrated strategy for promoting libertarian ideals and free-market principles, and, in doing so, protecting the Kochs’ sprawling petrochemical refining and shipping businesses. 

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