BlogsCanada.ca
"The Pulse of Canada "


 
Posts Tagged ‘harper’
 

 
0
comments
General

The end of “progressive” soft power

Posted September 30, 2014 by JR

A modified version of this column by Kelly McParland appeared in today’s Post as an editorial entiled “The end of ‘soft power'”:

U.S. President Barack Obama’s sudden about-face on the Middle East has exacerbated the difficulty that self-styled progressives face in sorting out how to deal with the world’s many emerging threats. Mr. Obama came to office preaching a highly progressive approach to confronting rogue, terror-supporting states: dialogue, diplomacy, co-operation and brotherhood, along with a pronounced reluctance to commit U.S. military forces on any fresh foreign entanglement. But it didn’t work. Now he’s trying bombs. He has come to realize that the most problematic actors on the world stage don’t share his enthusiasm for reason, negotiation and peace….

Having contributed military advisors to the effort against ISIS, Canada has a direct stake in this battle. The campaign should be of interest to Canadians for another reason, too. With Mr. Obama’s renunciation of his touchy-feely approach to international relations, it makes it difficult to argue that “soft power” and “honest brokerage,” two of our own foreign-policy establishment’s favourite catchphrases during the Liberal years, ever had much value on the world stage.  

Since Stephen Harper came to power, his opponents have crafted the notion that Canada once was a widely respect middle power that now has squandered its reputation thanks to the Conservatives’ renunciation of soft-power shibboleths. …

People who cut off aid workers’ heads don’t call out for “honest brokers.” They call out for bombs and bullets.

From the comments behind the pay-wall, Stephen Boyling wrote:

 This Editorial, although significantly watered down from what most of us have been saying for years, will do, especially after the immoral mea culpa Obama splashed us with during his UN pirouette.  The prime minister of Israel gave the speech the president of the United States of America should have given.  That, tied to the speech of prime minister Harper and his focus on what it takes, what is needed to suffocate the madness that is born in backwater dictatorships and 5-star sand lots made for a more than compelling argument when it comes to standing up to Islamic madness.

Next year in Canada, God save us from Obama-lite.  A man trying to run a race without first learning how to walk.

Amen.

Full Story »

 
0
comments
Canada

You’re Paying for Those Pot Holes Whether They’re Fixed or Not

Posted September 25, 2014 by The Mound of Sound

It’s no secret that essential infrastructure in North America is in a bad way. Neglect driven by tax cutting has led to deterioration in everything from roadways to overpasses, bridges, sewers and water mains.  The end result is essential infrastructure in immediate need of repair and replacement.

An illustration of the problem comes from a forced retreat of the “just in time” manufacturing sector.

Companies like Whirlpool and Caterpillar are making costly additions to their otherwise sinewy supply chains to compensate for aging U.S. roads that are too potholed and congested for “just in time” delivery.
Some opt to keep more trucks and inventory on the road. Others are leasing huge “just in case” warehouses and guarded parking lots on the edges of big cities. All that activity raises costs, which are expected to increase even more if roads are allowed to deteriorate further and an improving economy boosts traffic.
Whirlpool, for instance, has set up a network of secure drop lots outside Chicago, Milwaukee and Minneapolis. A washing machine that used to go from regional distribution center to local distribution center to customer in one day now sits overnight in a parking lot.
It “adds an extra day of lead time, which means extra inventory,” said Whirlpool Corp logistics chief Michelle VanderMeer.

Then there are the parking lots and the guards. “That’s real physical infrastructure and security that we have to pay for,” she said. “We’d rather be investing our money elsewhere,” she added, declining to estimate Whirlpool’s expenses.
Last summer, as Calgary flooded, the World Council on Disaster Management held its annual conference in Toronto.
Dr. Saeed Mirza, emeritus professor at Montreal’s McGill University specializing in structural engineering, added that the monumental infrastructure costs accumulated over decades of negligence have left Canada particularly vulnerable to catastrophic events.
“The frequency and intensity of these events has been increasing at an escalating rate and what was a one-in-100-year event at one time may become the norm,” he said.
Mirza estimated that Canada’s infrastructure requirements have reached a cost of about $1-trillion, while a recent survey by the McKinsey Global Institute earlier this year stated that worldwide infrastructure needs are about $57 trillion.
Canada needs a major infrastructure overhaul.  The premiers are trying to engage the federal government but Harper thinks a $50 billion programme spread out over ten years should suffice.  
 Welcome to Third World Canada.
Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

Speakers in Houses

Posted September 24, 2014 by Boris

Well, we’ve always suspected The Mouthpiece takes his orders from the Great Grey Glans. Mr. Mulcair finally called him out on it, and duly punished. On Iraq no less, where the Harper Regime has deployed Canadian troops but won’t tell us anything else a…

Full Story »

 
0
comments
Canada

Baubles, RCAF edition

Posted September 22, 2014 by Boris

The news yesterday was about the RCAF (officers, mostly, save for ‘aviators’) joining the RCN and the Army (officers, entirely) in the back to the future schtick of reverting to pre-Trudeau unification ranks and symbolism.

Judging by the RCAF Faceb…

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

Will Mike Duffy Call the Next Election?

Posted September 16, 2014 by The Mound of Sound

Sure, it sounds far fetched, but the opposition parties had better be prepared for Harper to call a snap election.Word I’m getting from Ottawa is that the evidence in the Duffy trial will directly implicate the prime minister in the under-the-table pay…

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

FIPA 2025

Posted September 15, 2014 by Boris

14 January 2026
In retrospect, the US military occupation of the Tar Sands and northwest BC coast to Kitimat and Prince Rupert in 2025 was a little predictable. The confrontation with China over energy resources had been brewing for years.

The 2014 …

Full Story »

 
0
comments
Federal Politics

This weeks column for 24Hrs Vancouver: Who’s Harper working for?

Posted September 15, 2014 by Laila

Is the China-Canada investment agreement a sell-out for Canada? When an agreement is conducted with so much secrecy and lack of consultation with Canadians that Rick Mercer dedicates an entire rant to the subject, you know something is up. Two … Continue reading

Full Story »


 
0
comments
Canada

Food for thought: Harper, IS and terror in Canada

Posted September 7, 2014 by Boris

Until now, Canada is not a country that has openly committed military forces to conflicts where the adversary uses terror attacks on our soil as a weapon. Yes, there have been the occassional half-arsed terror plots in the past decade or so, but unlike…

Full Story »

 
0
comments
Ethics

Harper’s politics of cynicism….

Posted September 7, 2014 by trashee

… and an empty shelf in the pantry where “ethics” used to be… Wandering around the Interweb, I found this cutting piece that brilliantly sums up the CPC modus operandi as follows: The Harper Government is a public relations oriented government. The machine seems to operate in the following manner; get the youngsters in the […]

Full Story »

 
0
comments
Canada

The Voters?

Posted September 1, 2014 by Boris

Where to begin.

The Globe is reporting Harper is resisting a NATO-wide call to increase defence spending to two per cent of GDP. He says it’s our fault apparently because us voters wouldn’t support such an increase in defence spending. Maybe so, but c…

Full Story »

 
0
comments
General

Harper’s Rangers

Posted August 25, 2014 by Boris

Not sure what this says or its accuracy… Via @DesConrad:

Full Story »

 
0
comments
Canada

La femme du français

Posted July 21, 2014 by Claude Dupras

Elle est née en Haïti. En 1968, sous la dictature de François « papa doc » Duvalier, sa famille fuit son pays pour s’établir à Thetford Mines, la ville de l’amiante québécoise au Canada, où il n’y a aucune famille noire. Elle a onze ans.

Ses études la mènent à l’université de Montréal où elle obtient un baccalauréat langues et littérature espagnoles et italiennes. Durant et après ses études, elle démontre une sensibilité particulière pour les femmes victimes de violence conjugale. Puis, les dirigeants du réseau français de Radio-Canada la remarque dans un documentaire de l’Office National du Film canadien et lui offre un emploi. Elle n’a que vingt ans. Elle devient reporter et animatrice et sept ans plus tard lectrice de l’émission de nouvelles « Le Téléjournal ». Elle est de plus, interviewer de personnalités canadiennes et d’autres pays.
Son nom est Michaëlle Jean et les Canadiens n’ont pas fini d’en entendre parler.
Elle épouse un français, cinéaste et philosophe, Jean Daniel Lafond. Ils adoptent une jeune fille haïtienne.
Bilingue parfaite, la chaine anglophone de Radio-Canada, quatre ans plus tard, l’invite à se joindre aussi à elle. Puis, elle devient animatrice du Téléjournal, et en 2004 anime sa propre émission « Michaëlle » diffusée en français.
En 2005, une surprise attend tous les Canadiens. Le 4 août, le premier ministre Paul Martin annonce que Michaëlle Jean devient Gouverneur Général du Canada, le 27ième. Les canadiens-haïtiens sont fous de joie, les autres étonnés. Elle est la première personne noire à remplir ce poste. Elle a 37 ans. Mais comme elle est aussi de nationalité française, acquise lors de son mariage, elle doit renoncer à celle-ci étant donné qu’elle sera la commandante-en-chef des Forces Armées Canadiennes. Ainsi est faite la constitution.  Elle rencontre, avec sa famille, la reine Élizabeth à sa maison d’été de Balmoral pour respecter la tradition et devient la vice-royale canadienne.
Son discours inaugural met l’accent sur ce qu’elle identifie comme les « deux solitudes » canadiennes. Elle veut instaurer un pacte de solidarité entre les peuples fondateurs du pays. Mais son discours va plus loin, et touche les relations entre les différentes communautés ethniques, linguistiques, culturelles et de genre.
La nouvelle Gouverneur générale est très active et représente la Canada partout : JO d’hiver en Italie, festival d’Iqaluit au Nunavut, en Algérie, au Mali, au Ghana, en Afrique du sud, au Maroc, en Argentine, en Haïti. Partout elle encourage les droits des femmes, particulièrement dans les pays musulmans. En Afghanistan, elle prend position pour la mission de paix affirmant que « le Canada est fier de faire partie des 37 pays qui ont entrepris de restaurer la stabilité et la reconstruction du pays ». Elle est à Vimy pour la commémoration du 90ième anniversaire de la bataille. Et encore… 
Elle rencontre les chefs d’état de multiples pays, dont la présidente du Chili, l’héritier et nouveau roi d’Espagne, le président hongrois et des dizaines d’autres.
En 2008, elle doit gérer une crise politique inédite au Canada. Le gouvernement minoritaire Harper est en difficulté après que l’opposition ait rejeté son énoncé économique. Les partis d’opposition lui proposent de se substituer au gouvernement en créant un gouvernement de coalition. Une première en politique canadienne. Elle refuse et décide de proroger la session parlementaire de deux mois jusqu’au dépôt du budget. Harper est sauvé.
À la fin du mandat de Michaëlle Jean, Harper crée une surprise en ne le renouvelant pas. Elle le voulait, il ne l’a pas voulu. Pourtant ses  prédécesseurs l’avaient fait pour les gouverneurs généraux du passé. Et cela, malgré que 57% des Canadiens approuvent son travail et considèrent qu’elle les a toujours représentés dignement et avec compétence. Harper est du genre conservateur-républicain-américain et veut avoir le contrôle total sur les affaires de l’état et comme elle montrait un peu d’indépendance…
L’ONU qui a remarqué les talents de Michaëlle Jean, la nomme « envoyée spéciale pour l’éducation, la science et la culture en Haïti » dans le but d’obtenir des fonds pour la reconstruction et l’éducation dans ce pays. Puis, le sénégalais Abdou Diouf, secrétaire général de la Francophonie, la nomme comme « grand témoin » pour les JO d’été de Londres afin de promouvoir la langue française. Entre temps, elle préside le conseil d’administration de l’Institut québécois des hautes études internationales à l’université de Laval et devient la chancelière de l’Université d’Ottawa.
Abdou Diouf démissionne de son poste en 2014 et Michaëlle Jean exprime son intention de le remplacer. C’est un poste très important. Mais elle n’est pas seule à viser cette nomination. Il y a aussi Pierre Buyoya, l’ancien président du Burundi, et le socialiste Bertrand Delanoë, l’ex-maire de Paris. Buyoya mise sur les suffrages de l’Afrique Centrale ce qui lui donne des créances démocratiques, tandis que Delanoë compte sur le fait qu’il est socialiste et qu’il a appuyé le président socialiste François Hollande lors des primaires de son parti pour le choix du candidat.
Michaëlle Jean ne désespère pas car elle a beaucoup d’atouts. N’est–elle pas un symbole de la francophonie plurielle ? N’a-t-elle pas l’esprit de résistance de son peuple comme elle l’a si bien démontré au Canada ? Ne s’est-elle pas investie dans le combat social canadien en travaillant auprès de femmes en difficultés ?  Malgré son travail intellectuel, n’a-t-elle pas toujours montré son sens pratique pour aider les femmes violentées ? Lors du terrible tremblement de terre  en Haïti, n’a-t-elle pas transformé son bureau en centrale téléphonique pour les initiatives de secours sur la base des informations reçues ?
Comme les Haïtiens dont la vie est difficile et qui souffrent, elle a démontré qu’elle sait composer avec le chaos et qu’elle a une capacité de résistance et d’organisation dans toutes situations. Tous les liens qu’elle a tissés avec les pays africains, dans sa carrière de journaliste et de chef d’État, ont créé une sympathie envers elle et naturellement Haïti, où étaient « menés des millions d’Africains lors de la traite négrière ». Elle propose aujourd’hui, une « francophonie de la diversité culturelle et du pluralisme », dont elle est l’exemple, « assise sur la francophonie politique, les valeurs démocratiques et l’état de droit » réalisés par les présidents passés de l’organisme.
Elle met surtout l’accent sur le développement économique qui est, pour elle, le vrai espoir des jeunes. « A quoi sert de produire des milliers de diplômés si c’est pour en faire des chômeurs ou des demandeurs d’asile ? », demande-elle ?
Elle réclame aussi le respect des droits de l’Homme qui pour elle « préservent les valeurs du peuple et son rayonnement plus grand que ses ressources », citant le Sénégal comme exemple.
Malgré que le Canada appuie sa candidature, c’est aussi un aspect négatif pour elle à cause du comportement offensif de sociétés minières canadiennes en Afrique. « J’entends mettre l’accent sur la responsabilité sociale des entreprises… », assure-t-elle pour obvier à ces craintes.
Michaëlle Jean a toutes les qualités pour bien remplir l’importante tâche de secrétaire générale de l’Organisation internationale de la Francophonie. Elle incarne la francophonie du futur, celle du bon sens économique. Elle est la candidate idéale pour être dans le monde, la femme du français.
Mais à ce jour, la France la boude. Elle se montre sceptique aux propositions de Michaëlle Jean, pour une francophonie plurielle et diverse qui s’ouvre sur le monde. Le malheur pour la candidate canadienne est que la France assure plus de 70% du budget de l’organisation, ce qui fait que sa voix est prépondérante. Je ne serais pas surpris que le gouvernement français opte pour un ses siens qui se cherche un emploi, le socialiste Bertrand Delanoë, ex-maire de Paris. Ce n’est pas le meilleur candidat, mais il est “du bon bord”. 
Claude Dupras

Full Story »



The Latest