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Searching For The Perfect Pint In Newcastle

Posted April 16, 2014 by Anonymous

Searching For The Perfect Pint In Newcastle

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Munchies: Guide to Oaxaca – Trailer

Posted April 15, 2014 by Anonymous

Munchies: Guide to Oaxaca – Trailer

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Canada

Fries Supreme

Posted April 14, 2014 by What's Different in Canada

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Somebody at Taco Bell Canada (probably stoned) must have remarked: “Canadians love fries with lots of stuff on top!” That is the only explanation for this only-in-Canada Taco Bell menu item, a bastardization of the least-Mexican Mexican food and an obvious stab at making “poutine,” fake-Mexican style. If you’re wondering when Canada will get the Taco Bell breakfast menu, the CEO has officially declared, “When you take Justin Bieber back.” 

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Wheat Isn’t the Reason Why You Can’t Stop Farting

Posted April 14, 2014 by Anonymous

Wheat Isn’t the Reason Why You Can’t Stop Farting

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I Was High on Amphetamines When I Served the Original Cast of ‘Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory’

Posted April 13, 2014 by Anonymous

I Was High on Amphetamines When I Served the Original Cast of ‘Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory’

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A Universal Guide to Bad Chinese Takeout

Posted April 12, 2014 by Josh Ozersky

A Universal Guide to Bad Chinese Takeout

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5 Tips for Improving Your Childa4s Eating Habits

Posted April 11, 2014 by MMarquit

Here are 5 tips that can help you improve your child’s eating habits:7 Zoom(s)

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Culture

Spice City Toronto: New Restaurant Puts Haitian Classics on the Menu

Posted April 11, 2014 by Sarah Efron / Spice City Toronto

Enjoy some Creole chicken or pick up some rare and tasty djon djon at St. Clair West’s La Créole.

Marinad, bits of fried dough typically sold as a street food in Haiti. Photo by Sarah Efron.

Haitian food is finally getting some love in Toronto. In the fall, Jen Agg from the Black Hoof opened a much-acclaimed Haitian spin-off restaurant, Rhum Corner, with her Haitian hubby Roland Jean. And just a few weeks ago, La Créole, a French Caribbean restaurant, opened up at 810 St. Clair Avenue West, between Oakwood and […]



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12 Easy Easter Cupcakes You Have to Try!

Posted April 11, 2014 by Anonymous

Easter is right around the corner and there is nothing easier that’s more fun than cupcakes for the kiddies (and adults!) for after that delicious Easter dinner! Gather the family or friends and try one of these fun and easy Easter treats! or two!! Easy Easter Cupcakes – Food Family and Travel Carrot Cupcakes – [Read On]

The post 12 Easy Easter Cupcakes You Have to Try! appeared first on Mom vs the Boys.

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Catch up Over Lunch with Wendy’s New Chef Inspired Salads! #NewSaladCollection #Wendys

Posted April 10, 2014 by Elizabeth

My best friend as an adult is definitely my younger sister.  Growing up my mom always told me not to snub her because one day we would be friends. HA!  Yeah right.  Or… so I thought.  Like most siblings we have had our ups and downs but mostly it has been ups.  Since Keira was […]
The post Catch up Over Lunch with Wendy’s New Chef Inspired Salads! #NewSaladCollection #Wendys appeared first on Frugal Mom Eh!.

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REVIEW: Philips AirFryer “Frying” The Better Way

Posted April 10, 2014 by Sonya

Fries are my weakness. Yes. I admit it. If I see poutine on a menu I’ll most likely gravitate (and levitate) to that first. I’m not kidding. But it’s a treat… yeah, yeah. But we don’t eat too much fried […]

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Vegan + Raw Mint Cacao Chip Smoothie

Posted April 9, 2014 by Anonymous

I’m not sure when I began to think I wasn’t enough. Not pretty enough, funny enough, smart enough, talented enough, desirable enough. For me it began in junior high, right around that critical age where self-image is unformed, tender even, and vulnerable to hurtful remarks and comments. ♥ I decided that I wanted to be […]

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Donate Your Piss to a Vermont Farmer

Posted April 9, 2014 by Anonymous

Donate Your Piss to a Vermont Farmer

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Easter Made Easy with Our Finest #WalmartEaster

Posted April 8, 2014 by Elizabeth

My family (as in my parents, brother and sister) celebrates Easter and we usually enjoy a big meal together after the Easter Service on Sunday.  We usually enjoy a nice big ham or a leg of lamb with potatoes and vegetables follow up with something sweet.  This year I was challenged to shop at Walmart […]
The post Easter Made Easy with Our Finest #WalmartEaster appeared first on Frugal Mom Eh!.

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Ham and Cheese Potato Casserole

Posted April 7, 2014 by Anonymous

With Easter right around the corner, I thought I would share with you one our favourite ways to use up left over ham! It’s a super cheesy ham and potato bake that is nicely served with a side of veggies and a warm baguette! Ham and Cheese Potato Casserole In a large bowl, combine potatoes, [Read On]

The post Ham and Cheese Potato Casserole appeared first on Mom vs the Boys.

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Homemade Salsa

Posted April 4, 2014 by Jody @ Mommy Moment

New post. Mommy Moment is owned by Jody Arsenault, from Manitoba, Canada.

Salsa is a must-have in our home. I love having homemade salsa on hand because it comes in so handy for many meals and it also makes a healthy snack. Last fall we had a lot of tomatoes given to us, so I made batch after batch of salsa to have us stocked over the […]

The post Homemade Salsa appeared first on Mommy Moment.

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Easter Bunny Cake Surprise

Posted April 2, 2014 by Jody @ Mommy Moment

New post. Mommy Moment is owned by Jody Arsenault, from Manitoba, Canada.

  Easter Bunny Cake Surprise I have many great memories of Easter as a kid. My favorite was when my mom would go hide our Easter chocolates outside. I loved searching behind trees and in the bushes, jumping between puddles trying to be the first one to find their little treasure. I have wanted to have […]

The post Easter Bunny Cake Surprise appeared first on Mommy Moment.

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Pad Tofu Long Song

Posted April 2, 2014 by Anonymous

One of our favorite dishes at The King and I restaurant is their Pad Kai Long Song. Traditionally this dish, also know as Swimming Rama, is made with succulent strips of tender chicken sauteed in a peanut sauce then served on a bed of spinach. It’s got something to do with the savory peanut sauce […]

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Wordless Wednesday ~ When Daddy Makes Dinner

Posted April 1, 2014 by Anonymous

This is what happens when Daddy makes dinner   Yup, for realz! Daddy made snake this weekend!! lol I do all the cooking during the week so when the weekend rolls around, I put Daddy-O in charge of all culinary delights and sometimes, well, sometimes he gets a little crazy!! This is actually a pretty [Read On]

The post Wordless Wednesday ~ When Daddy Makes Dinner appeared first on Mom vs the Boys.

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Zucchini Lasagna

Posted March 28, 2014 by Jody @ Mommy Moment

New post. Mommy Moment is owned by Jody Arsenault, from Manitoba, Canada.

I LOVE PASTA – and although I do eat the occasional rice pasta dish now, our real food way of living has us coming up with new ways to make old favorites. This zucchini lasagna recipe has become a fast favorite in our home. The best part is that it is easy to make – […]

The post Zucchini Lasagna appeared first on Mommy Moment.

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Thinking outside the (blue) box to make money from waste

Posted March 27, 2014 by Erich Jacoby-Hawkins
It gets the idea across powerfully, and it gets you banned from advertising in a local publication!

People realize we can’t just keep on throwing things away; some embrace it as a value, others simply have to deal with diminishing free public garbage removal and diversion programs that are either mandatory, or the only way to avoid high bag-tag or dumping fees.

The blue/grey box programs are pretty well known by now; we understand metal cans are sold for scrap, bottle glass gets crushed and re-used somehow, paper and cardboard get recycled back into new paper.

But other forms of recycling are more complex. How do they work? One thing we discard at an increasing rate, although not quite as much as weekly trash, is e-waste (or e-scrap): all the electrical devices we get rid of as we upgrade, or as they break down. They are toxic in landfill or incineration, but don’t go in the blue box. So what to do with them?

Well, this Saturday morning (March 29) you can bring them to the Earth Hour Super-Drive, hosted by Barrie’s Green Party on behalf of Off the Rack Free Clothing and the Barrie Food Bank. Along with donations of food items or used clothing, bring in your e-scrap and we’ll weigh it and pay you cash! The Super-Drive runs from 10 AM to noon in the parking lot behind 110 Dunlop St. W., off Toronto Street.

What do we do with your e-waste? It goes to Barrie’s own GreenGo Recycling, the first company in Canada to pay the public for e-scrap founded by Recychologist Rudy Westerneng, a specialized broker for members of the public who want to recycle beyond the blue box. GreenGo collects scrap from the public, pays for it, then separates it by category before shipping it to a wide variety of end-of-line processors across North America.

If you’ve ever heard Rudy singing in local radio spots, you’ll know that at “GreenGo Recycling they recycle everything”. Even better, they’ll pay you for most of it. Rates start low for steel, most e-scrap, batteries, and appliances, but metals like zinc, aluminum, stainless steel, brass, and copper command a premium, as do some electronics like PC towers, laptops, and cell phones, because these contain small but significant amounts of precious metals or rare earths.

Another item worth a bit more is low-grade motors, because of their copper content. Think power drills, kitchen blenders, even electric toothbrushes.

Rudy even pays for TVs (flat screen or tube), broken electric toys, lamps, vacuum cleaners, old fax machines or scanners or printers, cables, your mouse & keyboard, whatever had a plug or batteries or a chip or contains metal, even if it’s largely plastic.

Some of these are valuable on the commodity market; others (like old televisions) are reimbursed from the stewardship fee you pay whenever you buy new electronics in Ontario. Think of it like a bottle deposit: pay when you get the new stuff, bring back your old stuff to get it back.

As a participant in Ontario’s Orange Drop program, Rudy will also take your leftover or unused paint, and even has a rack where you can pick some up for free! He also buys unwanted clothing (clean & dry) for ten cents a pound, which either gets shipped to poorer nations for wearing or is ripped down to recover fibre, plastic, and metal.

So whether you come to our Super-Drive this Saturday morning or visit Rudy’s GreenGo operation on John Street, there is no excuse for just throwing things away, or leaving them to gather dust in the basement, attic, garage or shed. Recycle it!

Published as my Root Issues column in the Barrie Examiner as “Get rid of your e-waste this weekend in Barrie, maybe earn some cash
Erich Jacoby-Hawkins is a director of Living Green and the Robert Schalkenbach Foundation
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How I’m Losing Weight This Year: The Egg White Scramble

Posted March 17, 2014 by fatty

A couple years ago, I wrote about how I used egg whites and avocado to lose weight. A couple years later, people still ask me if I continue to be on the avocado and egg white diet. 
The answer is, “Yes…sort of.”
The problem, as you might expect, is that this particular diet works only if you actually [...]

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Quebec’s ice wine industry prepares for battle

Posted January 8, 2014 by Martin Patriquin

National vintner unity is at stake

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What’s hot? Sriracha

Posted January 8, 2014 by Cathy Gulli

Behind the growing demand for fiery food

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Dealer’s Choice: High on Hot Chlorophyll

Posted January 2, 2014 by VICE Staff

Above, fresh wasabi plant, leaves and all.

Welcome back to our column, Dealers Choice, where food expert Ian Purkayastha clues us in on what top chefs across America are serving on freshly ironed white linen tablecloths at upscale restaurants. Food dealer to over 300 restaurants nationwide, including a clientele of chefs like Sean Brock and Jean-Georges Vongerichten, Ian’s smooth talking sales pitch and top shelf product list has everybody hooked on the goods he’s slinging.

Real wasabi, aka wasabia japonica, is harder to get than high-quality heroin. Almost all worldwide wasabi consumption is a cheap, pre-mixed concoction of green food coloring, horseradish, and Japanese hot mustard. You can buy the fake stuff in a toothpaste tube, rolled up in a wet ball next to some red #40 marinated ginger and imitation crab roll in the 7-Eleven sushi case, or in powder form at mainstream grocery stores. 
 
Authentic wasabi paste, made from freshly grated rhizome—the green stem of the plant—is pretty dope in the realm of modern medicine. It’s served with raw foods like sushi because of its antimicrobial properties. Many doctors believe that it can prevent tooth decay, so stick some in your mouth and think about your dentist. Fresh wasabi stems contain chemical compounds known as isothiocyanates that improve liver function, treat and prevent blood clots, asthma, and even combat cancer. They’re also the culprit behind those fleeting moments of burning sensation in your nasal passage that feel like someone poured a bottle of Drano up there. 
 
Fresh wasabi is difficult to cultivate because of its finicky preference for cool, shady conditions, which is also why it has a shocking price tag of around $150 per pound. It is rarely grown outside of Japan, but in 1993, a small farmer in Vancouver, British Columbia received his first batch of wasabi seeds. Twenty years later, nine farms have blossomed, peppered throughout Canada, Oregon, and Washington State. 
 

Above, a wasabi rhizome up close and personal.

Useless, or Useful Information
Traditionally, wasabia japonica takes 18 to 24 months to grow before it develops into a fully mature rhizome ready for culinary usage. In North America, the modernized farms that grow these green plants use a mixture of hydroponic growing conditions and high-pressured water jet streams to grow rhizomes at a rapid pace between 12 and 15 months. 

Appearance
It’s green. Just look at it. 
 
Taste
Legit wasabi is an entirely different vibe from those pre-mixed green balls of heat whippets that everyone is accustomed to consuming. Freshly grated rhizome is fiery hot with a floral finish that will clear out any sinus infection. 
 
The Scent(s)
It smells spicy and green, like chlorophyll. If you don’t know what chlorophyll smells like, phone a biology teacher or sit inside of a greenhouse and take a big whiff.  
 
What to Do with a Batch of It
Baller chef, Masaharu Morimoto—Japanese kaiseki and sushi whisperer—stores rhizomes in fresh ice water that’s changed on a daily basis. This tactic allows for the wasabi to last for up to three weeks. 
 
When you’re ready to make that magic moment happen, rinse the rhizome under cold running water and scrape off any bumps or rough areas along the sides with a stiff brush. Cut it just below the leaf base and inspect the exposed flesh to make sure that it is uniform green in color. Grate the rhizome with a Microplane or a traditional wasabi grater for a smooth, even paste. It oxidizes quickly, so make it right before serving for the best results. 
 
Getting It
This stuff is harder to source than most of the esoteric food products on the US market, and I’m in the business. While I can’t divulge my sources, I would recommend exploring Japanese grocery stores to see if they are purveying fresh rhizomes. 
 
The Deal Breaker
The next time you find yourself at a Japanese restaurant or sushi spot where they’re not freshly grating the wasabi directly in front of you, I can almost guarantee that you are eating fake green glop straight from the jar. If that happens, stand up, knock your table over, and scream, “imposters” for best results. If you know that it’s fake, I get it. Sometimes, we all just want to eat paste without judgement.
 
More from Dealer’s Choice: 
 
 
 

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Economy

Are you ready for A Day in a Life?

Posted November 14, 2013 by Erich Jacoby-Hawkins

At the Food Not Bombs dinner last night the group’s founder and long-time organizer Keith McHenry spoke of the challenges sharing free food with the hungry. Powerful corporate interests don’t like to be shamed by juxtaposing their wealth with poverty next door; politicians must hide proof of their failed social and economic policies. So the cops are sent in to break it up, arrest volunteers, keep hungry people away from healthy food until it is trampled under-boot.

The pretexts are lack of permits, unhealthy food, creating a disturbance, but the root issue is active denial that poverty is a real and growing problem despite decades of economic “growth”. Well-paid airheads of corporate-owned media opine that the poor aren’t really poor, because many of them own a refrigerator, microwave, TV or cell phone, miracle devices even a king could not obtain 150 years ago! Yet an old appliance won’t keep you fed or pay the rent, cover its own electric bill, treat a chronic illness.

Too often the denial machine is successful, hiding how tough things really are for many in our own communities. Canada is lucky to not have as many examples of a violent government response to poverty, but I still encounter denial of the problems. Some assert that people are homeless by choice, or that most on welfare just don’t want to earn a living.

If you nod your head at either of those ideas, you owe it to yourself to come down to Barrie’s City Hall Rotunda on Monday, November 18th for a reality check. From 11 AM to 6 PM, the Barrie Chapter of the Alliance to End Homelessness is hosting “A Day in a Life” to open your eyes, and heart. Interactive displays will be anchored by a full-scale mock-up of a ten-by-ten “furnished” room from a shelter or rooming house. Learn about links between poverty and poor health, struggles to afford a healthy diet, challenges of finding and maintaining decent housing.

Obstacles are many. Physical or mental health problems or addictions can be a huge burden turning everyday situations into trials. Unexpected events or “detours” can shake someone from a comfortable life into a downward spiral. A simple lack of income is stress enough to trigger a raft of difficult choices, few if any of them leading to a decent and secure lifestyle.

This struggle exists right here in Barrie. If you think the solution is just to pull yourself up and make the best of it, then come to the display and show us how! At the income booth you’ll be issued the money someone on disability, welfare, or minimum wage receives, then make your way around the other stations to obtain food, transportation, clothing, health, and other basic needs and try to still have enough at the end to rent the 10×10 room.

Job statistics in Barrie show improvement, but many are still a long way from economic security. There’s plenty of temporary work, but we don’t have temporary rents or temporary mortgages. Minimum wage doesn’t cover even a minimum healthy life; even less so on part-time hours, or if trying to support a family.

Together we can build solutions, but first we must acknowledge and understand the problems. Are you brave enough to spend “A Day in a Life”?

Published as my Root Issues column in the Barrie Examiner as “Job stats in Barrie look good, but we’re a long way from economic security” or “Temporary work not enough”
Erich Jacoby-Hawkins is a director of Living Green and the Robert Schalkenbach Foundation.
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Cooking with Keith and Food Not Bombs: a route to community or jail?

Posted November 7, 2013 by Erich Jacoby-Hawkins


In August I announced the resumption of Barrie’s monthly Food Not Bombs dinners, featuring community-prepared vegan meals offered free to all. My activities since then have kept me connected to local food security: helping at Rosie’s Thanksgiving dinner and providing the Barrie Food Bank over a ton of fresh fruit in FruitShare Barrie’s pilot season. Like all successful projects, these involve the efforts and donations of many community members, and luckily, these efforts seem to have the support of everyone who hears of them, or at least, nobody seems to speak against them.

But I was surprised to learn, while researching Food Not Bombs, that this is not always the case elsewhere, that the simple act of feeding hungry people can lead to controversy, rejection, even arrest.

A recent story caught my eye: an atheist club wanting to help the poor offered to volunteer at a church-run soup kitchen in South Carolina. They were rudely rejected, told they were in league with the devil! Luckily the group, Upstate Atheists, remains undaunted and has cooperated with other community groups, including religious ones, delivering help to those in need. It disgusts me that any faith organization would rather divide community than bring caring people together.

But at least that was just a war of words. More concerning is people arrested and jailed for feeding the hungry on public property. That often happens to Keith McHenry, founder and organizer with Food Not Bombs for over 30 years. This author and artist has been arrested, jailed, beaten and tortured for his work promoting peace over militarism while addressing poverty, with Food Not Bombs targetted by authorities as a suspected terrorist group!

In San Francisco, the charge was “making a political statement”by providing free food near the Golden Gate Bridge, something it’s hard to believe can be a crime in the “Land of the Free”. McHenry was also arrested in Orlando, Florida for similar activity. In that city, a group must have a permit to distribute food at a park, and can only do it twice per year, before moving to another park. Food Not Bombs counters that people need to eat every day, not just twice a year, and that some locations (including the picnic area they use at Lake Eola Park downtown) are a better fit for that community activity.

If you find this opposition as shocking as I do, come to the next Food Not Bombs dinner at 6 PM this Tuesday, November 12 at the D.I.Y. Arts Collective at 67 Toronto Street and meet McHenry himself, as he will be the keynote speaker of “Cooking with Keith”. As always, literature about various political and community causes will be present, but unlike some programs, you don’t have to take part in the service before you eat! Dinner comes first, followed by what promises to be a very interesting presentation and discussion.

One of the principles of Food Not Bombs is to rescue discarded food that would otherwise be wasted, and redirect it to the hungry. An interesting documentary about food waste called “Dive!” will be featured at an upcoming Green Screen event hosted by Living Green. If you are interested in seeing this, sign up for newsletters at www.LivingGreen.info or www.TransitionBarrie.org and you’ll get an alert when the screening is scheduled.

Published as my Root Issues column in the Barrie Examiner as “Food Not Bombs finding its way to Barrie
Erich Jacoby-Hawkins is a director of Living Green and the Robert Schalkenbach Foundation
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Giving is the best way to celebrate Thanksgiving

Posted October 10, 2013 by Erich Jacoby-Hawkins
The time is upon us to give thanks for what we have received over the past year, whether it be food or fortune or just family and friendship. Yet this is also a time we can engage in actual giving, sharing some of that food or fortune with others. Giving to those in need has become a holiday tradition for my family, as important to us as coming together to celebrate.
Read on to find out why this woman wants to HUG you!
A couple of weeks ago I wrote of the false choice between helping the truly desperate in foreign lands, and helping those being left behind in Canada, in our own communities. And rather than buy the argument that we can’t help others until we help ourselves, I pointed out that the people who really want to help, will find ways to do one or the other or both rather than make excuses to do neither.
Well, if your preference is helping here at home, then an ideal opportunity is coming for you this Thanksgiving. Once again, Rose Romitawill be putting on her community feast, out of the goodness of her heart, her own wallet, and the generous donations of friends.

Can you be a friend in need? Every year Rosie needs help paying for the food, plus this year there is a facility rental fee to cover, so if you can offer a few dollars (or a big cheque!) it will really make a difference. Donations of other supplies are also welcome: plates, cutlery, pop or juice and desserts are specific needs.

This year’s dinner is at The West Event Centre located at Victoria Village, 146 Toronto St. If you’re finances are tight but you want to pitch in, you can also volunteer during the event, which runs on Thanksgiving Monday from noon – 6 PM, or if that day can’t work for you, you can help with the prep on Sunday from noon – 4. Call Rosie at 705-722-7763 to let her know about donations or ask about volunteering.

This year’s dinner will feature a new twist: a Free Hugs team lead by Jean Leggett, certified Laughter Yoga coach. Jean’s special mission is to inspire joy every day, to spread love and happiness ‘round the world via comedy, fun, and hugs. Although the dinner traditionally features the joy (or pain) of open-mike karaoke, the addition of free hugs will surely raise everyone’s spirits.

While holidays like Thanksgiving can bring out the need in the community and inspire us to help, it truly is a year-round need, and sometimes a longer commitment is more fulfilling, especially if your own family situation means you can’t be there with Rosie on holidays. So there are still programs like Barrie’s Out of the Cold, where you can help one shift per month over the winter to prevent the homeless from freezing outside. Shifts are of different types (serving a meal, keeping people company, or watching overnight) and times, and can be swapped to accommodate your schedule. To find out how to volunteer, please visit BarrieOutOfTheCold.org.

Published as my Root Issues column in the Barrie Examiner as “Many opportunities to help out in Barrie” or “Volunteering good for the soul”

Erich Jacoby-Hawkins is a director of Living Green and the Robert Schalkenbach Foundation.
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Four Healthy Living Tips

Posted April 8, 2013 by davids

Making healthy food choices, being physically active, and taking the right prescriptions regularly can go a long way in maintaining good health.

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