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OpenMedia.ca: Glenn Greenwald to speak in Ottawa at Oct 25 event sponsored by OpenMedia

Posted July 30, 2014 by Anonymous

Glenn Greenwald Speaks 2014, Ottawa

Pulitzer-prize winning journalist Glenn Greenwald is coming to Canada. He will speak about privacy, state surveillance, and its impact on Canadians at an event in downtown Ottawa sponsored by your OpenMedia.ca team.

WHO: Glenn Greenwald, American journalist, lawyer, and author, who is best known for his extensive reporting on the Edward Snowden NSA documents. WHAT: Canada, America – Together into the Storm – A talk by Glenn Greenwald followed by a discussion moderated by journalist Jesse Brown, the host of the popular Canadaland podcast. WHERE: 440 Albert Street, Ottawa, ON, Canada WHEN: Saturday October (Read more…)

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General

Glenn Greenwald to speak in Ottawa at Oct 25 event sponsored by OpenMedia

Posted July 30, 2014 by Anonymous

Glenn Greenwald Speaks 2014, Ottawa

Pulitzer-prize winning journalist Glenn Greenwald is coming to Canada. He will speak about privacy, state surveillance, and its impact on Canadians at an event in downtown Ottawa sponsored by your OpenMedia.ca team…

Full Story »

 
General

Why Has Bell Remained Silent on Its Subscriber Information Disclosure Practices?

Posted July 24, 2014 by Michael Geist

In the aftermath of the Supreme Court of Canada’s Spencer decision, several leading Canadian ISPs have publicly announced that they have changed their practices on the disclosure of subscriber information (including basic subscriber information such as name and address) to law enforcement. For example, Rogers announced that it will now require a warrant or court order prior to disclosing information to law enforcement except in emergency situations. Telus advised that it has adopted a similar practice and TekSavvy indicated that that has long been its approach. SaskTel says that it will release name, address, and phone number.

Unlike its competitors, Bell has remained largely silent in recent weeks. In media reports, the company says little more than that it follows the law.  In fact, the Toronto Star’s Alex Boutilier tweets that the company is now declining to respond to journalist inquiries about the issue. In the past, the company was a clear supporter of disclosing “pre-warrant” information in some circumstances to law enforcement. As detailed in this Canadian Bar Association article:

The post Why Has Bell Remained Silent on Its Subscriber Information Disclosure Practices? appeared first on Michael Geist.

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General

Come Back With a Warrant: How Will the Canadian Government Respond to the Supreme Court’s Reshaping of Privacy Law?

Posted July 21, 2014 by Michael Geist

Canadian Internet and telecom providers have, for many years, disclosed basic subscriber information, including identifiers such as name, address, and IP address, to law enforcement without a warrant. The government has not only supported the practice, but actively encouraged it with legislative proposals designed to grant full civil and criminal immunity for voluntary disclosures of personal information.

Last month, the Supreme Court of Canada struck a blow against warrantless disclosure of subscriber information, ruling that there is a reasonable expectation of privacy in that information and that voluntary disclosures therefore amount to illegal searches.

My weekly technology law column (Toronto Star version, homepage version) notes the decision left little doubt that Internet and telecom providers would need to change their disclosure policies. Last week, Rogers, the country’s largest cable provider, publicly altered its procedures for responding to law enforcement requests by announcing that it will now require a court order or warrant for the disclosure of basic subscriber information to law enforcement in all instances except for life threatening emergencies (warrantless disclosures may still occur where legislation provides the lawful authority to do so). Telus advised that it has adopted a similar approach.

The post Come Back With a Warrant: How Will the Canadian Government Respond to the Supreme Court’s Reshaping of Privacy Law? appeared first on Michael Geist.

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Big Brother

The End of Facebook at Politics, Re-Spun

Posted June 28, 2014 by Stephen Elliott-Buckley

Hello! Welcome to the post-Facebook Politics, Re-Spun website! You will not find a Like/Recommend button at all anymore. Anywhere. We’ve even stripped it from the ShareThis ribbon. We’re so nasty! :) Why? Because Facebook is the devil. And Big Brother. And a menace to social networking. They spent most of the last decade encouraging people […]

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