BlogsCanada.ca
"The Pulse of Canada "

 
Please Give Stumble a Thumbs Up!
 

 
General

The Expansion of Warrantless Disclosure Under S-4: Government’s Response Fails to Reassure

Posted April 13, 2014 by Michael Geist

My post and column
on the expansion of warrantless disclosure under Bill S-4, the
misleadingly named Digital Privacy Act, has attracted some attention and
a response from Industry Canada.  The department told iPolitics:

“Companies who share …

Full Story »

 
General

Why the Digital Privacy Act Undermines Our Privacy: Bill S-4 Risks Widespread Warrantless Disclosure

Posted April 9, 2014 by Michael Geist

Earlier this week, the government introduced the Digital Privacy Act (Bill S-4),
the latest attempt to update Canada’s private sector privacy law. The
bill is the third try at privacy reform stemming from the 2006 PIPEDA
review, with the prior two b…

Full Story »

 
General

U.S. Calls Out Canadian Data Protection as a Trade Barrier

Posted April 1, 2014 by Michael Geist

The U.S. Trade Representative issued its annual Foreign Trade Barrier Report
on Monday. In addition to identifying the geographical indications
provisions in the Canada – EU Trade Agreement, telecom foreign ownership
rules, and Canadian content regulations as barriers, the USTR discussed
regulations on cross-border data flows. I wrote about the issue recently, noting that the Canadian government restricted access to its single email initiative to Canadian-based hosting.

The USTR picks up on the same issue in its report:

The strong growth of cross-border data flows resulting from
widespread adoption of broadband-based services in Canada and the United
States has refocused attention on the restrictive effects of privacy
rules in two Canadian provinces, British Columbia, and Nova Scotia.
These provinces mandate that personal information in the custody of a
public body must be stored and accessed only in Canada unless one of a
few limited exceptions applies. These laws prevent public bodies such as
primary and secondary schools, universities, hospitals,
government-owned utilities, and public agencies from using U.S. services
when personal information could be accessed from or stored in the
United States.

 
The Canadian federal government is consolidating information
technology services across 63 email systems under a single platform. The
request for proposals for this project includes a national security
exemption which prohibits the contracted company from allowing data to
go outside of Canada. This policy precludes some new technologies such
as “cloud” computing providers from participating in the procurement
process. The public sector represents approximately one-third of the
Canadian economy, and is a major consumer of U.S. services. In today’s
information-based economy, particularly where a broad range of services
are moving to “cloud” based delivery where U.S. firms are market
leaders; this law hinders U.S. exports of a wide array of products and
services.

This issue bears watching given the growing momentum for localized data
hosting conflicting with provisions in the Trans Pacific Partnership
that would seek to restrict such provisions.

Full Story »

 
General

How Telcos and ISPs Hand Over Subscriber Data Thousands of Times Each Year Without a Warrant

Posted April 1, 2014 by Michael Geist

The lawful access fight of 2012, which featured then-Public Safety
Minister Vic Toews infamously claiming that the public could side with
the government or with child pornographers, largely boiled down to
public discomfort with warrantless access to…

Full Story »

 
General

Privacy czar scolds federal employees over lost hard drive

Posted March 25, 2014 by The Canadian Press

Data on 583,000 Canada Student Loans Program borrowers went missing

The post Privacy czar scolds federal employees over lost hard drive appeared first on Macleans.ca.

Full Story »

 
General

Obama backs limits on NSA phone collections from Americans and changes to overseas spying

Posted January 17, 2014 by The Associated Press

WASHINGTON – Seeking to calm a furor over U.S. surveillance, President Barack Obama on…

Full Story »



The Latest