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Books

Something to Read: Fannie Farmer Cookbook & Baking Book

Posted April 20, 2014 by emvandee

Yesterday we spent the day in Porteau Cove and it was rainy and everyone ended up damp to their skin but it was fun and Toddler had a fabulous day and when we got home I still had to put Easter together so last night, I didn’t end up posting (I did watch a few […]

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Books

Grownup Time: The Gospel Of Loki

Posted April 19, 2014 by Alice

This would be fine for older teens / stronger readers as well, but it’s denser than most teen fiction. It is certainly meaty enough for adults and was great fun. The Gospel of Loki, by Joanne M. Harris Orion Publishing, […]

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Books

Reading ‘Caliban’s War.’

Posted April 19, 2014 by heather

It did snow. Quite a lot. For most of the day. Snow and snow and snow. I tucked myself into Caliban’s War, the sequel to Leviathan Wakes and read the day away. It’s a very different book from the first; if you read them close together, there is a staggering sense of loss that carries […]

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Books

Something to Read: The Billingsgate Market Cookbook

Posted April 19, 2014 by emvandee

I think I’ve said it before, but I have a bit of a soft spot for British food. And not, like, the new kind, that Marco Pierre White-inspired next generation British cuisine, the stuff of Jamie Oliver and Nigella Lawson. I mean, like, BRITISH food. Sausages and potatoes. Stuff where herring features prominently. Dishes composed […]

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Books

Something to Read: American Food Writing

Posted April 18, 2014 by emvandee

A good story is as good or better than a good recipe, but a good story that ends in a recipe is about my favourite thing, because it means you can take the story with you and re-tell it, in a way, every time you make a dish. I like stories. With food in particular, […]

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Books

Something to Read: Foodie Babies Wear Bibs

Posted April 17, 2014 by emvandee

This post is a bit like cheating. I’m telling you about the book so I can share a recipe for muffins, which I feed to my non-foodie baby. I posted a photo of them to Instagram yesterday and someone asked for the recipe, so, since the recipe is for something I feed Toddler, why not […]

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Books

Something to Read: Flavors of Hungary

Posted April 16, 2014 by emvandee

One of the things I love about where I live is my close proximity to a whole bunch of bookstores. There’s a new one opening this week, even, and it’s on my way home from work! The convenience is incredible. One of the bookstores also happens to have a Twitter account and they post when […]

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Books

The origins of the conservative temperament

Posted April 15, 2014 by JR

In an excerpt from his new book, “Enlightment 2.0″, Joseph Heath gives two examples illustrating the “hubris of modern rationalism”, saying:… the conservative temperament was born, as a defence of tradition against the tendency of Enlightenment rati…

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Books

Something to Read: The Sriracha Cookbook

Posted April 13, 2014 by emvandee

We’ve been a sriracha household ever since Nick first tasted sriracha one fateful night at the 24-hour pho place that used to be at Broadway and Cambie. After maple syrup, it may be my favourite condiment; in fact, when we make chicken and waffles, we use them both together. (This pretty accurately describes how we feel.) While […]

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Books

Something to Read: Steingarten Double-Header

Posted April 12, 2014 by emvandee

My plan was to write every single day in April, but yesterday I came up short. It was Birthday Eve, and I just sort of melted into the couch with a bowl of pho and season four of Parks & Rec. It had been a long week; my boss has been away, so I’ve been using […]

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Books

Something to Read: Spoon Fed

Posted April 10, 2014 by emvandee

I’m still in a bit of a mood, as the pain after my wisdom teeth extraction remains ongoing. Tomorrow I have to leave the office for a bit to go back to the surgeon’s office to have him review his work. On my walk home from work today I simply couldn’t stand it any longer and […]

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Books

Something to Read: The New Purity Cook Book

Posted April 10, 2014 by emvandee

The New Purity Cook Book alleges, on its cover, that it is the complete guide to Canadian cooking. I’m not convinced that this is true, though it remains one of my most beloved books, though I only make one or two things from it. My parents had the book when I was growing up – […]

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Books

Do you restrict what your kids can read?

Posted March 23, 2014 by DaniGirl

Had you told me before I had kids that I’d be reading aloud each night to my kids beyond the age of ten, I’d have laughed. I mean, sure, we’re a bookish family, and reading is sacred – but I would not have imagined that they would still not only enjoy but actively request out-loud [...]

Related posts (automatically generated):

  1. Five great books to read aloud to boys
  2. Kids, books and a love reading: Part One of two
  3. Our favourite kid books of 2012
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Books

Weekend reading.

Posted March 16, 2014 by heather

Two books finished this weekend: Moonwalking With Einstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything by Joshua Foer, and Definitely Maybe by Arkady and Boris Strugatsky. The memory book was okay – a bit drawn out, heavy on talking about the history of memory, but a bit light on the techniques of memorization. It read […]

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Books

The weekend reading.

Posted March 10, 2014 by heather

Oof. Time change. The first morning is rough; the bus driver seemed to agree because we hit just about every curb on the way up to work. I’m shortly going to settle into my morning writing, but a blog post seems like the best way to ease into that. A quiet weekend. A good weekend. […]

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Books

What if Ariel Sharon had woken from the coma?

Posted January 20, 2014 by Bookmarked

A review of ‘Arik: The Life of Ariel Sharon’

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Books

A Serial Killer in Nazi Berlin

Posted January 20, 2014 by Bookmarked

By Scott Andrew Selby

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Books

‘Artis Henderson’s memoir will be on my list of best of 2014′

Posted January 20, 2014 by Bookmarked

A review of “Un-remarried Widow: A Memoir’

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Books

‘A Moz pit of misery’

Posted January 20, 2014 by Bookmarked

A review Morrissey’s unorthodox autobiography

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Books

‘Not all fairy tales are happy’

Posted January 20, 2014 by Bookmarked

A review of “The Fairy Tale” by Jonas T. Bengtsson

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Books

The best reads of 2014

Posted January 3, 2014 by Brian Bethune

Miriam Toews, weird science, a bird’s-eye view of the Great War and, of course, Rob Ford.

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Books

‘Mindfulness Starts Here’ – The final review

Posted December 23, 2013 by Tanya McGinnity

So here we are. The end of my full-on, eight week experiment in working with the practices within ‘Mindfulness Starts Here: An Eight Week Guide to Skillful Living’ by doctors Lynette Monteiro & Frank Musten, founders of the Ottawa Mindfulness Clinic . Now a quick bit of housekeeping. I’m in the camp of those who […]

The post ‘Mindfulness Starts Here’ – The final review appeared first on Full Contact Enlightenment.

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Books

An 8 Week Long Book Review : Week 8 – Mindfulness Starts Here

Posted December 15, 2013 by Tanya McGinnity

Well I’m into week eight of ‘Mindfulness Starts Here – An Eight-Week Guide to Skillful Living’ by Lynette Monteiro, PhD & Frank Musten, PhD  (cue ‘Eye of the Tiger’ as I mindfully spit out some well packed chaw out of my mouth). This final chapter titled ‘Preparing for the Next Chapter’ scared me into thinking […]

The post An 8 Week Long Book Review : Week 8 – Mindfulness Starts Here appeared first on Full Contact Enlightenment.

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Agriculture

James McCrorie Obituary

Posted November 22, 2013 by Next Year Country

McCRORIE, James

What though on hamely fare we dine,
Wear hoddin grey, an’ a that;
Gie fools their silks, and knaves their wine;
A Man’s a Man for a’ that:
For a’ that, and a’ that,
Their tinsel show, an’ a’ that;
The honest man, tho’ e’er sae poor,
Is king o’ men for a’ that.

- Robbie Burns

It is with great sadness that we announce the death of James Napier McCrorie on November 17, 2013. Jim (though always James to his mother) was born in Montreal Quebec in 1936 to Thomas and Margaret McCrorie, immigrants from Scotland. Jim is survived by his beloved wife and best friend Elaine (nee Cameron), and his children and their spouses whom he loved: Ian, Ann (Alistair Mackenzie), and Aaron (Carmen Abela). Jim was the very proud and loving grandfather of Nicole, Liam, Jenna, Kennedy. Reuben and Keira. An only child, he gained a clan-ful of siblings through the Camerons of Moore Park Manitoba – Don and Joyce Cameron, Niel and Marianne Cameron, Jean and Leo Kristjanson, Hector and Leonora Cameron. He is fondly remembered by all his nieces, nephews, dear friends and comrades of all ages and those who have described him as a second father. 

Growing up in Montreal, Jim learned to speak joual and remained proud throughout his life of his ability to speak the working man’s French. He became a life long fan of the Habs and taught us all that Maurice “the Rocket” Richard was the greatest hockey player ever. Montreal remained dear to his heart throughout his life. Growing up he also learned to play the piano, and while he regretted that lessons and practice kept him from mischief with his pals, we all appreciated the magic his playing brought to many occasions.

All who knew Jim, will remember his love of the sea and trains. He came by it honestly – sailing across the Atlantic to visit his “ain falk” in Ayrshire at 16, working in the dining cars for CP Rail after high school and proudly serving in the Royal Canadian Navy. Throughout his life Jim would take the train while others would fly or drive and he had just booked his next big trip, Ottawa to Melville, when he passed away. 

Jim studied sociology at McGill University and got his doctorate from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The opportunity to work with the Saskatchewan Farmers Union brought this city boy to the prairies which he came to love and provided the subject of his doctoral thesis – “In Union is Strength”. It was while working in Saskatoon that Jim’s friend and colleague Leo Kristjanson introduced him to Elaine Cameron. She eventually forgave Leo and married Jim in 1964 with a memorable reception at the Wright farm south of Saskatoon. Thanks to their love for each other (and Elaine’s patience) they enjoyed almost 50 years of happy marriage. 

The chance to help build a new and teaching-centric program brought Jim to the newly established University of Regina in 1965. It was in Regina that Jim and Elaine raised their family – with two memorable yearlong sojourns in Scotland. As a father Jim instilled an appreciation of honest hard work, love of life and family and a social conscience in his children. And while life was busy he always found time to watch the kids play hockey, volleyball or football. The outcome did not matter, it was the effort that mattered. And as a grandfather Jim continued to teach these lessons and adored spending time with all of his grandchildren.

Jim combined a love of teaching and academia with the passion and conviction to change the world. For Jim, social activism and teaching were inseparable efforts to make the world a better, more socially and economically just place. There were victories and defeats, but the progressive struggle continued – in the classroom, through distance education and on the NDP convention floor. And where Jim wasn’t active, those he taught and mentored were. 

As an academic, Jim took a particular interest in the social effects of North Sea oil development, the life and career of Scotland’s Roderick MacFarquar (“The Highland Cause“) and the experience of Canada’s Spanish Civil War vets. Jim was among those who played a leading role in establishing the Spanish Civil War memorial in Ottawa. 

In the 1980′s, Jim took a break from teaching and became Director of the Canadian Plains Research Center. The job combined his deep love of the prairies with the opportunity to continue learning and teaching by reaching out to similar social and ecological regions as far flung as Nebraska and Kazakhstan. Jim finally retired in 1996, but remained active intellectually (“The Man in the Green Truck“), politically and socially. 

Jim loved to talk with, not to, everyone. No matter where you came from, what you did, or how old you were he wanted to hear your story and learn from you. And while he was passionate in his convictions, he was respectful of those who viewed the world differently. Red-Clyde Marxists, Spanish Civil War vets, musicians, wary teenagers and former Progressive Conservative cabinet ministers were all welcome at the McCrorie dinner table. 

Jim loved to tell stories, sometimes more than once. And he had a great sense of mischief and fun. Supper time, hogmanay, the Brigadier’s lunch, family reunions, visits and all those other occasions that Jim loved so much will sadly be a touch more sedate without his stories, gentle jokes and infectious laugh. 

We loved Jim and he will be missed. In lieu of flowers the family asks that donations be made to the Dr. Paul Schwann Centre’s Cardiac Rehabilitation and Chronic Disease Prevention, Management and Risk Reduction Program at the University of Regina (3737 Wascana Parkway, Regina, SK S4S 0A2) or the Canadian Center for Policy Alternatives (500-251 Bank Street, Ottawa, ON K2P 1X3).

Family and friends are invited to sign the online obituary and tributes page at www.regina-memorial.ca. Arrangements entrusted to – See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/montrealgazette/obituary.aspx?n=james-mccrorie&pid=168122304#sthash.YvwW1aLR.dpuf

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Agriculture

James N. McCrorie: 1936 – 2013

Posted November 20, 2013 by Next Year Country

Remembering Jim McCrorie

It was a very sad moment to hear of Jim’s passing.

Jim was truly a mentor to all of us who had the privilege of being his friend through his life.


As young students he taught us what radical sociology and critical thinking were all about. Jim reflected the struggles of people from the crofters of Scotland, to the farmers of Canada as social movements for us to learn from, and to appreciate as people’s histories.


With a wry Jim McCrorie smile and humour, he would tell us what really happened in the governance of the land from Tommy Douglas to today.


He was unremitting in his socialism – but with a Scottish pragmatism – looking at outcome as well as theory.


Jim was an inside out person. He lived what he believed – never forgetting his class background – recognizing the education of many to understand the economic and social forces that shape us… as the road to a better world.


Thanks Jim for what you gave us. And as you said and wrote ..In Union Is Strength. Viva Jim!

In Solidarity

Don Kossick in Mozambique, November 18th, 2013


A Celebration of James Napier McCrorie


Céilidh

A traditional Gaelic social gathering, which involves, music, dancing and story telling.

In honour of James N. McCrorie


Saturday, November 30th 2013

6:30-11:30

Edna May Forbes Lecture Theatre
2900 Wascana Drive
Regina, Saskatchewan

Map HERE.


Buy Jim’s memoir “No Expectations” HERE.


“I was born on a Tuesday, at 07:40 hrs.on April 21, 1936 at the Royal Victoria Hospital in Montreal. The hospital had been founded in the late 19th century by two business adventurers (i.e. rogues) from near Craigellachie, Banffshire, Scotland. The building had been built on the northern slope of Mount Royal, just above the James McGill estate – now a university. It resembled, in style, the Edinburgh Royal Infirmary. It was therefore a fitting venue for the son of Scottish immigrants to enter the world and although I was present at the event, I have no recollection of it.” – From the Introduction.


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Books

Perserverance Wins Out

Posted July 14, 2013 by Marguerite

Some people might say I’m stubborn as a mule.  I might even agree to that.  But there’s something to be said for refusing to take no for an answer.Five years ago we were living in Gibsons, British Columbia.  Renting someone else’s home a…

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Books

In praise of audio books

Posted June 18, 2013 by Darren

Podcasts were my gateway drug into audio books. Some time around 2007, I started listening to more books than I read. Some of my first audio…

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Books

Triumphs and Tragedies

Posted June 8, 2013 by Marguerite

It’s been too long since I’ve posted and there’s so much to cover!  Things both good and bad so…. triumphs and tragedies seems like the right kind of post.There’s been a lot of stress lately.  I came down with a miserable cold right before …

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