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Books

Northern Dancer: a legendary Canadian horse

Posted April 17, 2014 by Bookmarked

A review of ‘Northern Dancer: The Legendary Horse that Inspired a Nation’ by Kevin Chong

The post Northern Dancer: a legendary Canadian horse appeared first on Macleans.ca.

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Books

Maclean’s books: long weekend reading

Posted April 17, 2014 by Bookmarked

This week’s reviews: A look at legendary horse Northern Dancer, the muder of Joseph Smith, and Teju Cole’s debut novel

The post Maclean’s books: long weekend reading appeared first on Macleans.ca.

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Books

Japan and the art of survival

Posted April 17, 2014 by Bookmarked

A review of ‘Bending Adversity’ by David Pilling

The post Japan and the art of survival appeared first on Macleans.ca.

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Books

The murder of Joseph Smith

Posted April 17, 2014 by Bookmarked

How the founding prophet of the Mormons went from charismatic leader to public enemy

The post The murder of Joseph Smith appeared first on Macleans.ca.

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Books

Teju Cole’s tremendous first novel

Posted April 17, 2014 by Bookmarked

A review of ‘Every Day is for the Thief’

The post Teju Cole’s tremendous first novel appeared first on Macleans.ca.

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Books

Living on the coast, waiting for the big one

Posted April 17, 2014 by Bookmarked

A review of “The Next Tsunami: Living on a Restless Coast” by Bonnie Henderson

The post Living on the coast, waiting for the big one appeared first on Macleans.ca.

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Books

Paul Wells wins Dafoe Prize for The Longer I’m Prime Minister

Posted April 16, 2014 by Bookmarked

Maclean’s political editor picks up another award for his acclaimed book on Stephen Harper

The post Paul Wells wins Dafoe Prize for The Longer I’m Prime Minister appeared first on Macleans.ca.

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Books

The F***-It List

Posted April 13, 2014 by Alice

You’ve heard of bucket lists… The F***-It List, by Julie Halpern Feiwel & Friends, ISBN: 978 1 250 02565 4 Alex had a crap summer both grieving her dad’s death and being mad at her bff Becca, but she’s pretty much […]

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Books

Good News! Parts Of The Giver Film Will Be In Black And White After All

Posted April 11, 2014 by Meredith Woerner

Everyone relax: The Giver movie is going to be in black and white after all. Bullet dodged. Read more…

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Books

Sue Townsend …. RIP

Posted April 10, 2014 by MariaS

Kind of a sad day today. **sigh**  
Thank You Sue Townsend for the wonderful Adrian Mole and all the laughs.

From BBC:
….Sue Townsend, author of Adrian Mole books, dies after short illness.  

Novelist Sue Townsend, best known as the aut…

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Books

Longreads Joins the Automattic Family

Posted April 9, 2014 by Anonymous

We’re delighted to announce that Longreads is joining the Automattic family.

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Books

Something to Read: Alone in the Kitchen with an Eggplant

Posted April 8, 2014 by emvandee

I’ll admit that most of the times I end up cooking for just me, I eat weird food. Last time Nick was away, one night for dinner I ate a whole purple cauliflower, roasted with olive oil and garlic, and three eggs, scrambled medium-rare in probably more butter than was necessary with a lot of […]

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Books

Something to Read: How to Cook a Wolf

Posted April 7, 2014 by emvandee

There are times when helpful hints about turning off the gas when not in use are foolish, because the gas has been turned off permanently, or until you can pay the bill. And you don’t care about knowing the trick of keeping bread fresh by putting a cut apple in the box because you don’t […]

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Books

Something to Read: The Williams-Sonoma Cookbook

Posted April 5, 2014 by emvandee

Williams-Sonoma is ridiculous and I love it. Our last apartment was about half a block off Granville Street, and three blocks away from Vancouver’s only Williams-Sonoma. It was a weird place to live, because the rent was very affordable and many of the apartment buildings were very old, but all the stores were for the […]

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Books

Something to Read: The Perfect Scoop

Posted April 5, 2014 by emvandee

Well, I did it. I had my teeth out, and it sucked and apparently I cried. I think I only heard the “sedation” part when I attended my consultation with the surgeon; I did not hear the part about consciousness. ‘It will be like you have had a few too many glasses of wine, Ms. Wight,” they […]

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Books

Something to Read: I Like You (Hospitality Under the Influence)

Posted April 4, 2014 by emvandee

Tomorrow I’m going in to have my wisdom teeth removed. I was supposed to do it ten years ago, when they first poked through my gums, but I didn’t have dental coverage or very good dental coverage – I can’t remember – and also I’m a big fat chicken. So, I let them hang out in there, […]

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Books

Something to Read: Food and Trembling

Posted April 2, 2014 by emvandee

I have so many cookbooks and books on food that my collection has its own shelf. We don’t really have room for it, but I’m quite happy to have a shelf full of books I don’t really have room for and won’t hear complaints about my hoarding, so Nick copes. My dream is that someday […]

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Books

Scholastic Books are the Perfect addition to Easter Baskets

Posted April 2, 2014 by Anonymous

We are a chocolate loving family, from the smallest member to the biggest, it’s a pretty tough call on who is the biggest chocoholic! So during the holidays, and especially Easter there tends to be a fair bit of chocolate eggs and bunnies in the house, but I still make sure that the kids aren’t [Read On]

The post Scholastic Books are the Perfect addition to Easter Baskets appeared first on Mom vs the Boys.

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Books

Something to Read: The Alice B. Toklas Cook Book

Posted April 2, 2014 by emvandee

I can be a bit of a pain to travel with, because I don’t care so much about seeing sights or sites and just want to get to the bookstore. In San Francisco, the first time, City Lights Bookstore was my first and most important To Do, and I went there just about first thing […]

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Books

Do you restrict what your kids can read?

Posted March 23, 2014 by DaniGirl

Had you told me before I had kids that I’d be reading aloud each night to my kids beyond the age of ten, I’d have laughed. I mean, sure, we’re a bookish family, and reading is sacred – but I would not have imagined that they would still not only enjoy but actively request out-loud [...]

Related posts (automatically generated):

  1. Five great books to read aloud to boys
  2. Kids, books and a love reading: Part One of two
  3. Our favourite kid books of 2012
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Books

The end is nigh! Repent!

Posted March 17, 2014 by JR

The National Post’s Ian Hunter gets sucked in by the latest doom-monger:

Elizabeth Kolbert — a staff writer at The New Yorker whose new book ‘The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History’ is likely to be one of the most-talked-about non-fiction books of the year.

A mass extinction that’s already underway and likely to be the most devastating since an asteroid struck the Earth and brought an end to dinosaurs. The difference this time is that we, humanity, are the asteroid….

it is not just climate change: We are cutting down the rain forests, acidifying the oceans, moving species around the world at breakneck speed and pumping out more carbon dioxide than the atmosphere can handle.[Actually, most of that is about climate change.]

it’s difficult to be sanguine in the face of the evidence she presents.

Hunter, a lawyer and journalist, is enthralled by the apocalyptic speculations of another journalist.

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Books

Weekend reading.

Posted March 16, 2014 by heather

Two books finished this weekend: Moonwalking With Einstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything by Joshua Foer, and Definitely Maybe by Arkady and Boris Strugatsky. The memory book was okay – a bit drawn out, heavy on talking about the history of memory, but a bit light on the techniques of memorization. It read […]

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Books

The weekend reading.

Posted March 10, 2014 by heather

Oof. Time change. The first morning is rough; the bus driver seemed to agree because we hit just about every curb on the way up to work. I’m shortly going to settle into my morning writing, but a blog post seems like the best way to ease into that. A quiet weekend. A good weekend. […]

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Books

Reading Andy Weir’s ‘The Martian.’

Posted February 23, 2014 by heather

We had our Dungeons and Dragons night, and quite a lot of it was spent asking ‘am I on fire?’ and ‘am I still on fire?’ It’s an unfortunate thing when you try to put out yourself out and end up setting everybody else on fire as you do. Bad form, that. I didn’t get […]

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Books

What if Ariel Sharon had woken from the coma?

Posted January 20, 2014 by Bookmarked

A review of ‘Arik: The Life of Ariel Sharon’

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Books

A Serial Killer in Nazi Berlin

Posted January 20, 2014 by Bookmarked

By Scott Andrew Selby

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Books

‘Artis Henderson’s memoir will be on my list of best of 2014′

Posted January 20, 2014 by Bookmarked

A review of “Un-remarried Widow: A Memoir’

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Books

‘A Moz pit of misery’

Posted January 20, 2014 by Bookmarked

A review Morrissey’s unorthodox autobiography

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Books

‘Not all fairy tales are happy’

Posted January 20, 2014 by Bookmarked

A review of “The Fairy Tale” by Jonas T. Bengtsson

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Books

The best reads of 2014

Posted January 3, 2014 by Brian Bethune

Miriam Toews, weird science, a bird’s-eye view of the Great War and, of course, Rob Ford.

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Agriculture

James McCrorie Obituary

Posted November 22, 2013 by Next Year Country

McCRORIE, James

What though on hamely fare we dine,
Wear hoddin grey, an’ a that;
Gie fools their silks, and knaves their wine;
A Man’s a Man for a’ that:
For a’ that, and a’ that,
Their tinsel show, an’ a’ that;
The honest man, tho’ e’er sae poor,
Is king o’ men for a’ that.

- Robbie Burns

It is with great sadness that we announce the death of James Napier McCrorie on November 17, 2013. Jim (though always James to his mother) was born in Montreal Quebec in 1936 to Thomas and Margaret McCrorie, immigrants from Scotland. Jim is survived by his beloved wife and best friend Elaine (nee Cameron), and his children and their spouses whom he loved: Ian, Ann (Alistair Mackenzie), and Aaron (Carmen Abela). Jim was the very proud and loving grandfather of Nicole, Liam, Jenna, Kennedy. Reuben and Keira. An only child, he gained a clan-ful of siblings through the Camerons of Moore Park Manitoba – Don and Joyce Cameron, Niel and Marianne Cameron, Jean and Leo Kristjanson, Hector and Leonora Cameron. He is fondly remembered by all his nieces, nephews, dear friends and comrades of all ages and those who have described him as a second father. 

Growing up in Montreal, Jim learned to speak joual and remained proud throughout his life of his ability to speak the working man’s French. He became a life long fan of the Habs and taught us all that Maurice “the Rocket” Richard was the greatest hockey player ever. Montreal remained dear to his heart throughout his life. Growing up he also learned to play the piano, and while he regretted that lessons and practice kept him from mischief with his pals, we all appreciated the magic his playing brought to many occasions.

All who knew Jim, will remember his love of the sea and trains. He came by it honestly – sailing across the Atlantic to visit his “ain falk” in Ayrshire at 16, working in the dining cars for CP Rail after high school and proudly serving in the Royal Canadian Navy. Throughout his life Jim would take the train while others would fly or drive and he had just booked his next big trip, Ottawa to Melville, when he passed away. 

Jim studied sociology at McGill University and got his doctorate from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The opportunity to work with the Saskatchewan Farmers Union brought this city boy to the prairies which he came to love and provided the subject of his doctoral thesis – “In Union is Strength”. It was while working in Saskatoon that Jim’s friend and colleague Leo Kristjanson introduced him to Elaine Cameron. She eventually forgave Leo and married Jim in 1964 with a memorable reception at the Wright farm south of Saskatoon. Thanks to their love for each other (and Elaine’s patience) they enjoyed almost 50 years of happy marriage. 

The chance to help build a new and teaching-centric program brought Jim to the newly established University of Regina in 1965. It was in Regina that Jim and Elaine raised their family – with two memorable yearlong sojourns in Scotland. As a father Jim instilled an appreciation of honest hard work, love of life and family and a social conscience in his children. And while life was busy he always found time to watch the kids play hockey, volleyball or football. The outcome did not matter, it was the effort that mattered. And as a grandfather Jim continued to teach these lessons and adored spending time with all of his grandchildren.

Jim combined a love of teaching and academia with the passion and conviction to change the world. For Jim, social activism and teaching were inseparable efforts to make the world a better, more socially and economically just place. There were victories and defeats, but the progressive struggle continued – in the classroom, through distance education and on the NDP convention floor. And where Jim wasn’t active, those he taught and mentored were. 

As an academic, Jim took a particular interest in the social effects of North Sea oil development, the life and career of Scotland’s Roderick MacFarquar (“The Highland Cause“) and the experience of Canada’s Spanish Civil War vets. Jim was among those who played a leading role in establishing the Spanish Civil War memorial in Ottawa. 

In the 1980′s, Jim took a break from teaching and became Director of the Canadian Plains Research Center. The job combined his deep love of the prairies with the opportunity to continue learning and teaching by reaching out to similar social and ecological regions as far flung as Nebraska and Kazakhstan. Jim finally retired in 1996, but remained active intellectually (“The Man in the Green Truck“), politically and socially. 

Jim loved to talk with, not to, everyone. No matter where you came from, what you did, or how old you were he wanted to hear your story and learn from you. And while he was passionate in his convictions, he was respectful of those who viewed the world differently. Red-Clyde Marxists, Spanish Civil War vets, musicians, wary teenagers and former Progressive Conservative cabinet ministers were all welcome at the McCrorie dinner table. 

Jim loved to tell stories, sometimes more than once. And he had a great sense of mischief and fun. Supper time, hogmanay, the Brigadier’s lunch, family reunions, visits and all those other occasions that Jim loved so much will sadly be a touch more sedate without his stories, gentle jokes and infectious laugh. 

We loved Jim and he will be missed. In lieu of flowers the family asks that donations be made to the Dr. Paul Schwann Centre’s Cardiac Rehabilitation and Chronic Disease Prevention, Management and Risk Reduction Program at the University of Regina (3737 Wascana Parkway, Regina, SK S4S 0A2) or the Canadian Center for Policy Alternatives (500-251 Bank Street, Ottawa, ON K2P 1X3).

Family and friends are invited to sign the online obituary and tributes page at www.regina-memorial.ca. Arrangements entrusted to – See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/montrealgazette/obituary.aspx?n=james-mccrorie&pid=168122304#sthash.YvwW1aLR.dpuf

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Agriculture

James N. McCrorie: 1936 – 2013

Posted November 20, 2013 by Next Year Country

Remembering Jim McCrorie

It was a very sad moment to hear of Jim’s passing.

Jim was truly a mentor to all of us who had the privilege of being his friend through his life.


As young students he taught us what radical sociology and critical thinking were all about. Jim reflected the struggles of people from the crofters of Scotland, to the farmers of Canada as social movements for us to learn from, and to appreciate as people’s histories.


With a wry Jim McCrorie smile and humour, he would tell us what really happened in the governance of the land from Tommy Douglas to today.


He was unremitting in his socialism – but with a Scottish pragmatism – looking at outcome as well as theory.


Jim was an inside out person. He lived what he believed – never forgetting his class background – recognizing the education of many to understand the economic and social forces that shape us… as the road to a better world.


Thanks Jim for what you gave us. And as you said and wrote ..In Union Is Strength. Viva Jim!

In Solidarity

Don Kossick in Mozambique, November 18th, 2013


A Celebration of James Napier McCrorie


Céilidh

A traditional Gaelic social gathering, which involves, music, dancing and story telling.

In honour of James N. McCrorie


Saturday, November 30th 2013

6:30-11:30

Edna May Forbes Lecture Theatre
2900 Wascana Drive
Regina, Saskatchewan

Map HERE.


Buy Jim’s memoir “No Expectations” HERE.


“I was born on a Tuesday, at 07:40 hrs.on April 21, 1936 at the Royal Victoria Hospital in Montreal. The hospital had been founded in the late 19th century by two business adventurers (i.e. rogues) from near Craigellachie, Banffshire, Scotland. The building had been built on the northern slope of Mount Royal, just above the James McGill estate – now a university. It resembled, in style, the Edinburgh Royal Infirmary. It was therefore a fitting venue for the son of Scottish immigrants to enter the world and although I was present at the event, I have no recollection of it.” – From the Introduction.


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Books

Perserverance Wins Out

Posted July 14, 2013 by Marguerite

Some people might say I’m stubborn as a mule.  I might even agree to that.  But there’s something to be said for refusing to take no for an answer.Five years ago we were living in Gibsons, British Columbia.  Renting someone else’s home a…

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Books

In praise of audio books

Posted June 18, 2013 by Darren

Podcasts were my gateway drug into audio books. Some time around 2007, I started listening to more books than I read. Some of my first audio…

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Books

Triumphs and Tragedies

Posted June 8, 2013 by Marguerite

It’s been too long since I’ve posted and there’s so much to cover!  Things both good and bad so…. triumphs and tragedies seems like the right kind of post.There’s been a lot of stress lately.  I came down with a miserable cold right before …

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