#BlogsCanada.ca
"The Pulse of Canada "


 
 

 
Books

6 Overlooked Takeaways From a Reviewer of Controversial Texas Textbooks

Posted December 17, 2014 by Anonymous

In September 2014, I found myself standing before a mostly hostile Texas…

Full Story »

 
Books

Book Giveaway: Live at the Commodore

Posted December 17, 2014 by Rebecca Bollwitt

© 2004-2014 Rebecca Bollwitt – Miss604. If I was Miss Sheilds from the beloved holiday film A Christmas Story I would legitimately give Aaron Chapman’s new book Live at the Commodore an “A Plus-Plus-Plus-Plus…!” It arrived by courier last week and I immediately sat down to read it. I didn’t budge as the sun crossed […]

The post Book Giveaway: Live at the Commodore appeared first on Vancouver Blog Miss604.

Full Story »

 
Books

What I’m Reading: Slogging Through Marriage

Posted December 4, 2014 by Jennifer

Weddings are wonderful; newlywed life is exciting and full of life, but marriage… marriage is hard. Don’t get me wrong. I’m happily married and wouldn’t trade my husband for any other partner, but being married can be work. Figuring out […]

Full Story »

 
Books

Giving Tuesday: ALL Profits from Great Fatsby Pre-Order Go To WBR (And Get Matched)

Posted December 2, 2014 by fatty

It’s December 2nd, often called Giving Tuesday. It’s also the penultimate day of my Great Fatsby pre-order.
So how about this: today, I’m going to donate ALL profits from pre-orders of The Great Fatsby, the Great Fatsby t-shirt, and the Team Fatty jersey to World Bicycle Relief.
But here’s the really crazy part: since the profits will […]

Full Story »

 
Books

Guest Post from Dan Wuori, Who Wrote the Foreword (and Middleword, and Backword) of The Great Fatsby

Posted December 1, 2014 by fatty

A Note from Fatty: Today’s guest post comes from Dan Wuori, the back-page columnist for Velo Magazine. He also agreed to write the Foreword to my (very) soon-to-be-published The Great Fatsby: The Best of FatCyclist.com, Vol. 2. 
Also, he wrote the Middleword, something I don’t think many books have. I was joking when I asked him to write […]

Full Story »

 
Books

20% Off! Black Friday – Wednesday Deal on The Great Fatsby Pre-Order

Posted November 28, 2014 by fatty

We’re down to the last few days of the pre-order of The Best of FatCyclist: Volume 2 – The Great Fatsby. And also—I know this will come as a big shock to a lot of you—beginning with today, everyone is putting everything on sale!
And I didn’t want to feel left out.
So, for the last few days […]

Full Story »

 
Books

How a “green” journalist came to hate radical environmentalists

Posted November 24, 2014 by JR

Elizabeth Nickson explains how she came to write her book “Eco-Fascists: How Radical Conservationists Are Destroying Our Natural Heritage”:It’s an excellent book, by the way.See also, Agenda 21.

Full Story »

 
Books

The Machine Stops

Posted November 23, 2014 by James Bow

Maybe it’s kismet, but as I write The Curator of Forgotten Things, I’ve been encountering more and more references to E.M. Forster’s Edwardian science fiction novella, The Machine Stops. This story, written in 1909 (and in the public domain; the…

Full Story »

 
Books

What To See At INSPIRE! Toronto International Book Fair

Posted November 12, 2014 by Jennifer

Toronto-area book lovers are looking forward to a new and exciting event this weekend. INSPIRE! Toronto International Book Fair is Canada’s book exposition for all things print and digital, launching this weekend, November 13 to 16, 2014. From literature to […]

Full Story »

 
Books

7 Ways To Celebrate Family Literacy Month

Posted November 11, 2014 by Anonymous

Written by Kait Fowlie November is family literacy month! It also happens to be the best time of the year to indulge in some serious reading—the rainy days, cold nights, the lull before the Holidays—November is meant for curling up […]

Full Story »

 
Books

What I’m Reading: Let’s Hear It For the Girls

Posted November 4, 2014 by Jennifer

My nine-year-old daughter is a voracious reader of series. She has plowed through everything from Magic Tree House to Chris Colfer’s Land of Stories trilogy, and she loves finding a series that gets her hooked. Recently she started Rick Riordan’s […]

Full Story »

 
Books

Memoir: Velvet & The Mousehouse Years

Posted October 16, 2014 by Sonya

Velvet Haney went from living a life of poverty in the slums of Toronto in the 1960s to gallivanting around the world as a high fashion model, returning to Toronto 14 years later. And for over 50 years, she has […]

Full Story »

 
Books

What I’m Reading: Fall Books

Posted September 30, 2014 by Jennifer

Aaaaahhhh fall! So much to love about the season: boots and tights; apple crisp and pumpkin pie; cooler days and turning leaves. And just as we leave our beach and pool days behind, so too do we turn away from […]

Full Story »

 
Books

Book Review: “Turning Confusion into Clarity”

Posted September 14, 2014 by Tanya McGinnity

Yongey Mingur Rinpoche’s latest book “Turning Confusion into Clarity” did just what the title promised. Well, at least the first two sections…. As a student and practitioner who is getting ready to dip a toe into ngondro practices (steady there, I still have a little ways to go), this book came at the right time […]

The post Book Review: “Turning Confusion into Clarity” appeared first on Full Contact Enlightenment.

Full Story »

 
Books

Currently reading: ‘Turning Confusion into Clarity’ by Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche

Posted September 1, 2014 by Tanya McGinnity

I have been enjoying to no end the latest book from Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche titled “Turning Confusion into Clarity”. It’s one of those ‘Oh look. I highlighted everything’ kind of books. It’s one of those “I know I will be referring to this book often in my life’ kind of books. It’s one of those […]

The post Currently reading: ‘Turning Confusion into Clarity’ by Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche appeared first on Full Contact Enlightenment.

Full Story »

 
Books

Naomi Wakan Poet Laureate

Posted August 20, 2014 by davids

In October 2013 Gabriola Island resident Naomi Wakan was appointed the first poet laureate of the city of Nanaimo, Canada. Her forthcoming book, Naomi in Nanaimo, will collect her Nanaimo poet laureate poems.

Full Story »

 
Books

Regrets, I’ve Had a Few… But Would You Change Anything?

Posted August 1, 2014 by Nikki Stafford
A couple of weeks ago I read two books that had just come out, by authors I’d read before and loved. The first was Seconds by Bryan Lee O’Malley, he of Scott Pilgrim graphic novel series fame. Scott Pilgrim is a six-book series about a guy living in Toronto in his early 20s, battling the ex-boyfriends of the girl he wants to be with. Secondsis a one-off standalone novel about Katie, a girl living in what seems more like Southwestern Ontario (where O’Malley is originally from, and where I now live after moving here from Toronto a couple of years ago), in her 30s, at a certain point in her life where she’s questioning the decisions she’s made to get to this point. As anyone who is 40 or older can tell you, life seems to follow a certain expected trajectory: childhood, then choosing your future as a teenager, when you are insane and hormonal and should NEVER be making life decisions, but there it is. Your 20s are for getting a start in that life and shooting off in the direction you chose as the crazy teenager, your 30s are for moving up in whatever life direction you’ve chosen, and your 40s are to start sitting back and enjoying the ride, because you’ve made it to the top.

In theory.

But see, often (not always, I should add), somewhere in your mid-30s, you realize maybe you’re not quite there. And a quick check into the future tells you you’re not going to get there. You’ve started changing. You’ve met new people, you’ve discovered new things, and suddenly that life trajectory that seemed perfect in your stupid teenage years isn’t so rosy anymore.

I didn’t have a single regret at age 34. At 40, I have several.

And that’s where Katie’s finding herself. She opened a fabulous restaurant with friends called Seconds, and it’s become THE hot spot in town. But she was the chef, not the owner, and over time many of the friends bailed, and the owner became distant, and she’s decided to set out on her own and buy a building downtown, near a bridge, and fix it up so it’ll become her new restaurant, called Katie’s. But the building is more decrepit than she thought it would be. And she can’t seem to stay away from hanging around Seconds. And then there’s that guy she was madly in love with whom she let go a few years ago, who keeps coming to the restaurant and making her regret her choices.

And then one night, an accident happens at the restaurant that she causes.

When she returns to her room, there’s a blonde girl sitting atop her dresser, hunched over like a little pixie, and gives her the opportunity to eat one mushroom, write down the one thing she wants to change on a pad of paper, and in the morning, poof… the accident no longer happened, and things are set aright. You can only do this once, she’s told. But… what if she did it just one more time?

Or, maybe… a few more times?

Seconds is a fabulous book, and I can’t recommend it highly enough. I adored the Scott Pilgrim series, but Secondsis more mature, and the illustrations are gorgeous.

The other book I picked up was Landline by Rainbow Rowell. I first discovered Rowell’s writing last year when I read Fangirl, and thought it was an excellent examination of fandom and the way fans feel around non-fans, people who think we spend too much time on the internet or blogging, and the argument about fan fic vs. original fiction. Rowell, who is one of the best fan fic writers on the interwebs, was clearly writing from experience, and I instantly felt a connection to her main character. And then I picked up Eleanor & Park, which is one of the most extraordinary YA novels I’ve ever read. Yes, I did my due diligence as a YA reader and also read The Fault in Our Stars right after, and yet E&P resonated with me so much more. It was beautiful, and real, and set around the very time I was experiencing my own first love, and we connected the same way Eleanor and Park do: through Smiths records.

Landline is the story of a woman who writes for television, and who gets her big break for the pilot she’s been shopping around with her colleague for years. The catch: she has to write the first four episodes before Christmas, which is 10 days away, and therefore she can’t go away to Omaha to see her husband’s family for Christmas. Her husband, tired of her putting work before family again, picks up the girls and takes them anyway, leaving her behind, and he refuses to answer his cellphone for days. Alone, confused, upset, regretful, and not sure what to do, she goes to her parents’ house, the same one she grew up in, and one night pulls out the old yellow rotary phone to call her husband. And… he picks up. But his father picks up first. The father who died a couple of years ago.

When she realizes this rotary phone is somehow a conduit into the past, she’s suddenly faced with a possibility: can she have discussions in the present that will affect her decisions in the past? Could she say or do something right now that will alter what happened before, and change the trajectory of her life?

I loved the book, and thought Rowell hit the emotions right on the head on every page. And I was equally surprised that the theme was so close to O’Malley’s book. Here I was picking up books from two authors I really enjoy reading, and both of them are tackling the same issue: getting to a certain point in our lives and questioning everything that came before. And, through magic realism, allowing their characters to explore the possibility of changing those decisions to see what might happen to them.

Like every reader will no doubt do, I closed both of these books wondering what I would change. I’m someone who tends to think things through five steps ahead of the present one (which is why I don’t take many risks, probably), and so every time I thought of something I might like to change, I traced the consequences of that action, and there was always a price to pay.

I wish I’d kept up this blog more, instead of letting people leave in a mass exodus because I was so exhausted when Lost ended that I just couldn’t keep up the pace after the final book came out. But if I’d kept focused on the blog, I wouldn’t have time to do the freelance work I do now, or read as many books, or spend time with my kids. I still write on here occasionally, and get a total of four comments (one of which is inevitably pointing out something big I missed in my rushed review), and that’s my new normal.

There’s the book writing opportunity I was offered four years ago that I turned down because I’d just finished the final Finding Lost book, and it turned out to be a much bigger opportunity than I would have guessed, which has devastated me. After years of working as a professional writer, this would have been the big time. And I blew it. But again, I would have spent the last four years travelling and being away from my family, and with so much upheaval here, I probably couldn’t have done that. I can deal with a missed opportunity, as hard as it’s been, but I couldn’t possibly deal with anything shaking up the strong family I have. Perhaps another opportunity will come, one that will allow me to stay put and still write. 

So much has happened to me in the past four years — both very good and very bad — and when it’s all weighed, I’m a very happy person. I’m the first to say motherhood is the best thing that’s ever happened to me, but I also see so many people around me without kids who are achieving great things because they don’t have to worry about anyone else (and my husband has definitely had an upward trajectory while I’ve kept the home fires burning), and I gave up my job and city to move to a smaller town so I could spend more time with my kids. I love them with all my heart, and think they’ll always be more important than any blog or book or job will ever be.

Sure, I still have that Marlon Brando moment like everyone else does at some point in their lives. I could have been somebody.

And then I became a mom. And suddenly I was no longer a somebody, and realized I never really would be. But, I’d be the most important somebody to two people. At least, for the next few years I will be. And I realize there are people out there at the top of their game, beloved and/or famous and/or extremely successful, and they have a dresser full of regrets, too. Just like in that BtVS episode “Earshot,” everyone has their own problems and regrets, and no one’s is more important than another’s. 

But if I had a yellow rotary phone, or a pixie sitting atop a dresser with a magic mushroom… who knows what I would wish to change in my past? Would I ever take that risk? Do I really want to, or, when all is said and done, is this the happiest and best outcome there could possibly be?

Would you do it? 

Full Story »

 
Books

My Name Is Nikki Stafford . . . And I Am an Addict

Posted July 9, 2014 by Nikki Stafford

My friends have always ribbed me as the girl with no vices.

I don’t drink. I don’t drink coffee. I’ve never even taken a puff from a cigarette. I’ve never done recreational drugs of any kind. (Seriously, I’m that boring kid at parties.) I don’t particularly like ice cream or desserts. I love chocolate, but rarely crave it. I’ve never bought expensive shoes, and typically find one pair — whether it’s a pair of Docs or Clark’s — and wear them until the soles are worn off. I don’t buy expensive clothes, and prefer jeans and t-shirts. I don’t buy expensive handbags: I own a single Coach purse that I bought on sale, and have had it for four years and will no doubt wear it for another 10. Until I got that, I’d used the same $10 Old Navy purse for over a decade. I don’t wear jewelry, though occasionally I’ll find something really unique and I’ll buy it, but it’s never more than $50. And we’re talking one of those a year. Maybe. I’m constantly joking with my husband that he doesn’t know how good he’s got it: those credit card bills of ours contain zero extravagances for me.

Well, except for one itty bitty thing…

Back in December, I announced here that I would stop buying books for one year. I acknowledged I had a problem, and I was going to stop buying them by the dozen (no really, I buy armloads at a time) and actually read the hundreds — hundreds — of unread books that surround me on my dozen bookshelves. My house is a library, where there isn’t a single room without a book in it. My kitchen is full of cookbooks (which I actually read like novels), as is the pantry in my dining room. My side table beside the bed has so many stacks of books on it that, as I joked to a friend last week, I knock a book off every morning when I try to hit the alarm’s Snooze button — because of spending five years taking English lit at university, I got so used to reading several books at once that I still do it. My kids have several bookshelves in each of their rooms. The bathrooms are filled with magazines. The family room and living room have shelves of books. Even the guest bedroom, music room, exercise room and storage spaces have books shoved into every free space. And my office has so many books that every shelf is filled, more books are shoved into the free space on top of the books, the tops of the shelves have books, they’re stacked on the floors, and that one shelf where I have put all my Buffy figures? I now eye it daily and think, “OK, Spike, you’ve fallen off that stand so many times that I should just sweep all of you guys into a bag and use this shelf for BOOKS.” But I haven’t gotten there yet.

I’ve read a ton of them. Every shelf probably has 10-15 books on it that I’ve actually read. But that leaves another 10-15 that I haven’t. And that is A LOT.

And so, I decided I wouldn’t buy books this year. Nor would I take any out of the library. I was going to make a concerted effort to read what was on my shelves, and see if I could match the 55 books I managed to read last year.

Then I started making exceptions, and that’s where addictions always fall apart. I belong to two book clubs (sometimes three), and I said whatever books they chose, I’d buy/get from the library so I could keep up. But that’s 24 books right there. Already I’d put a major dent in my Year of Reading From My Own Shelves.

Then, on December 31, I placed an order for 10 books, books that I’d wanted for some time, but now that I’d put a one-year moratorium on my book-buying, I needed them NOW. So after deciding I needed to read some of the hundreds of books on my shelf, I was already up to 10 new ones, and 24 other ones that I’d have to buy/borrow. That left only about 20 that I could read from my own collection. Not even one shelf’s worth.

And then, in February, my children’s school had a book sale to raise money for their library. The kids begged me to take them there after school, and they looked over the books and I told them they could take what they wanted (I’ve never put a limit on books). $1 for a paperback, $2 for a hardcover. And that’s when I saw JK Rowling’s Cuckoo’s Calling on a table in mint condition. Wait, $2 for a brand new book? That’s amazing! Without even thinking, I put it into the stack of books the kids had chosen and went up to pay for them. It’s only as I handed over my money my heart suddenly jolted and I realized, Wait… I can’t buy any books!! Oh no… oh no… So I decided I will give this one to my husband. Yes, that’s the ticket! I can still give books as gifts, yes? And if it just happens to still be on my shelf next year, why then yes, I can read it. Whew. Crisis averted.

Then my birthday happened. And someone gave me an Indigo bookstore gift card. They were barely out the door before I raced to my computer, heart pounding with excitement, and began filling up my cart. Ooh… I went over the amount. Ah well, it’s my birthday, right? I felt my heart beat faster, and my stomach was doing flip-flops of excitement. Two days later the books arrived and I grabbed them excitedly from the mailbox, ripped open the box and smelled them. They smelled WONDERFUL. (This is why I’ve yet to switch to a Kobo…)

Two weeks later two of the books that I’d worked on as an editor arrived in the mail: Wanna Cook, the Breaking Bad companion guide by Dale Guffey and Ensley Guffey, and Elephant in the Sky by Heather Clark (both astoundingly good books, by the way!) Just seeing a book-shaped package gave me shivers of excitement, and I could barely contain myself as I ripped the package open and handled them for the first time. Shortly after, one of my book clubs had their monthly meeting in a bookstore. I saw books that I wanted so desperately — OMG, so-and-so has a new book?! — but knew I couldn’t have them.

And on the way home, I realized no, I can’t do this. In fact, I’d more than proven already that I hadn’t done this at all. I’d failed miserably. My moratorium on books had lasted all of six weeks before I’d fallen off the wagon, and then when someone gave me a gift I was like an addict.

And that was when I realized something even bigger: I’d always joked that I was addicted to buying books, but I really was. The way alcohol or caffeine or drugs give people a high that they can’t get from anything else, that’s how I feel when I buy books. There’s so much possibility between those covers, so many worlds and new people to meet and adventures to be had. If I choose my books wisely, I’ll be introduced to new ways of thinking and new ideas that I’ll be mulling over for weeks, months, even years.

So I gave up. I decided no, I’m not wasting a year of my life not doing one of the things I love most. I have friends who are in serious credit card debts over shoe purchases or expensive clothes-buying binges, and that’s not me. Books are relatively cheap, and they are WONDERFUL.

I love reading books. But I discovered that I might enjoy discovering and buying them even more. I literally have physical changes when I’m in the midst of purchasing a book: my heart really does race, my stomach gets fluttery. I have a buzz and feel overwhelmed with joy. The smell and look of a bookstore makes me so happy. A couple of weeks ago I was in an independent bookstore in San Francisco with my best friend Sue (who also tried the year-long moratorium and failed equally spectacularly) and it made me realize how much I love and long for independent bookstores. I’ll go to a Chapters/Indigo long before I’ll buy something on Amazon, but the fluorescent lights and overwhelming smell of Starbucks and warehouse-like look of the place is no match for the soft lighting, smell of old paper, occasional creaky floors, and hand-selling that happens at an independent. The one I found in SF was called Booksmith’s, in the heart of the Haight-Ashbury district, and I spent SO much time in there reading the dozens and dozens of cards they’d carefully placed under all their favourite books (not just New Releases but everywhere throughout the store) and was madly writing down titles of books that intrigued me, knowing I couldn’t carry every single one of them back to the hotel. I went up to the owner of the store and told him how much I adored his place, and he seemed genuinely thrilled to hear it. I chose a single book by Maud Casey as my prize (based on the card that recommended it), and felt that rise in pulse as I handed over my money for it. After I got home I looked up the store online and discovered there was a whole wealth of bookstores in SF, and maybe I need to make a trip there where I do nothing but shop in bookstores the entire time. Hm… I might actually go into cardiac arrest if I did that…

Many addictions are bad. Whether it’s hard drugs or alcohol that have destroyed lives and families, or shopping sprees or gambling addictions that have crippled people financially, or eating disorders that threaten the lives of their victims, we tend to look at the nature of addiction as something uncontrollable and evil, filled with hurt and pain. I’ve had many friends fight addictions for years, and while not all of them were able to overcome their demons, I’m happy to say many of them have recovered and are leading extraordinary lives now.

I saw my book-buying addiction (and the physical changes, sense of compulsion, and overwhelming high that accompanies it would suggest it is, in fact, an addiction) as something that I needed to curb, that I needed to stop so I could focus on the glorious worlds that currently exist on my bookshelves. But I’ve come to terms with the fact that I’ll never live long enough to read many of the books I currently own, and that I can’t stop buying new ones. I can let go, though — when we moved the last time, I probably got rid of 100 books (which I offered up to friends first) — so it’s not like a person would come to my house and be tripping over books wherever they go. There is an order to my chaos.

But I love bringing new books home. I love discovering the worlds that exist within them, even if I never actually get to live in those worlds. And when I’m in the midst of a good book — like the one I’m reading right now, actually — it’s hard to concentrate on doing much else because all I want to do is read that book. I’ve always been that person watching prison dramas and thinking, “You know, if I was put into solitary confinement for a year, imagine all the reading I could get done!!!

So I don’t need to curb my addiction. I don’t need to curb that thrill of buying new books. I don’t need to stop discovering new books. I’ve never gotten a credit card bill with a book-buying charge on it that was so high my husband’s eyes bugged out of his head. He spent more money fixing and rewiring his guitars last month than I’ve spent all year on books. In fact, the one good thing that came out of the moratorium was that I gained a whole new appreciation for how much I love buying and reading books. I always said I loved it, but now I truly know that it’s an essential part of who I am.

In fact, for the first time, yesterday I popped into Chapters online and ordered Rainbow Rowell’s new book on the day of its release. (And then had that very 21st-century impatient feeling of, “Geez, I wish they could ship it to arrive RIGHT NOW” about two minutes later…)

And it was so damned exciting.

Full Story »



The Latest